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Author Topic: Grain for a classic German Pils?  (Read 8807 times)

Offline MDL

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Re: Grain for a classic German Pils?
« Reply #15 on: October 07, 2021, 04:33:34 am »
Been liking a 50/50 blend of Best Heidelberg and Best Pilsner malt lately.

That and Hop Heaven Mittelfruh. I can’t believe the difference in hop freshness with their hops. Even the noble hops are resin bombs compared to other hop sources.

Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Re: Grain for a classic German Pils?
« Reply #16 on: October 07, 2021, 05:17:05 am »
Been liking a 50/50 blend of Best Heidelberg and Best Pilsner malt lately.

That and Hop Heaven Mittelfruh. I can’t believe the difference in hop freshness with their hops. Even the noble hops are resin bombs compared to other hop sources.

Good to know, ordered 2 pounds of Hallertau whole leaf.

Offline majorvices

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Re: Grain for a classic German Pils?
« Reply #17 on: October 07, 2021, 02:35:29 pm »
German brewers will buy locally.  I looked at Avangard, they have a malting in Koblenz, not too far from Bitburg.

I had major problems with Avengard. I bought it in super sacks at Yellowhammer and maybe it was just bad luck but it was full of chaff and I didn't;t feel like the beer turned out very good. I switched back to Best as soon as I was through it and was very thankful that period was over. I literally had to go through an entire tracker trailer load of Avengard super sacks (2000 lbs each).

I like Wyermann too. The floor malted Wyermann is good but you definitely need to boil for 90 minutes because I got a lot of DMS from that malt.
I had a crap bag of Best Pils. It happens.

I guess, yeah, if it was a sack I'd be forgiving. This was a tractor trailer full of 2000 lb super sacks. The samples I got were great, that's why I switched.

I also thought our lagers took a flavor hit in the wrong direction.I was very, very glad when we got through those sacks. Went right back to Best.

Offline dbeechum

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Re: Grain for a classic German Pils?
« Reply #18 on: October 07, 2021, 03:07:37 pm »
I feel like half of the German style pils I've had here in LA are made with Weyermann Bohemian and the other half made with Weyermann Barke
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Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Re: Grain for a classic German Pils?
« Reply #19 on: October 08, 2021, 05:26:51 am »
I feel like half of the German style pils I've had here in LA are made with Weyermann Bohemian and the other half made with Weyermann Barke

Used the Bohemian Pils malt numerous times, but not the Barke. Can you give some insight on this particular malt?

Offline tommymorris

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Re: Grain for a classic German Pils?
« Reply #20 on: October 08, 2021, 06:47:06 am »
I feel like half of the German style pils I've had here in LA are made with Weyermann Bohemian and the other half made with Weyermann Barke
Hmmm, those two malts are quite a bit more expensive than Best, Avangard, Viking, and the American malts that they could use- at least at the homebrew level. I guess they think the difference in the beer is worth the extra expense.

Nothing against Weyermann. I like them, but I only brew 3 gallons at a time so the extra cost feels negligible to me.

Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Re: Grain for a classic German Pils?
« Reply #21 on: October 08, 2021, 08:05:13 am »
I feel like half of the German style pils I've had here in LA are made with Weyermann Bohemian and the other half made with Weyermann Barke
Hmmm, those two malts are quite a bit more expensive than Best, Avangard, Viking, and the American malts that they could use- at least at the homebrew level. I guess they think the difference in the beer is worth the extra expense.

Nothing against Weyermann. I like them, but I only brew 3 gallons at a time so the extra cost feels negligible to me.

Yes, Weyermann must be considered a "premium" malt as they command premium prices.
On another forum, there was a post stating the brewer could not tell any difference in the same beer brewed with malts from different companies.

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Grain for a classic German Pils?
« Reply #22 on: October 08, 2021, 08:15:17 am »
I feel like half of the German style pils I've had here in LA are made with Weyermann Bohemian and the other half made with Weyermann Barke

Used the Bohemian Pils malt numerous times, but not the Barke. Can you give some insight on this particular malt?

Barke is an older German Barley variety. It does have a rich flavor. Some say it is what most of the breweries around Munich use, don't  know if that ix true. Weyermann  makes Barke Pils, Vienna, and Munich malts.
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Offline denny

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Re: Grain for a classic German Pils?
« Reply #23 on: October 08, 2021, 08:18:33 am »
I feel like half of the German style pils I've had here in LA are made with Weyermann Bohemian and the other half made with Weyermann Barke
Hmmm, those two malts are quite a bit more expensive than Best, Avangard, Viking, and the American malts that they could use- at least at the homebrew level. I guess they think the difference in the beer is worth the extra expense.

Nothing against Weyermann. I like them, but I only brew 3 gallons at a time so the extra cost feels negligible to me.

Or maybe they're going by reputation and haven't tried the others.
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Offline denny

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Re: Grain for a classic German Pils?
« Reply #24 on: October 08, 2021, 08:19:05 am »
I feel like half of the German style pils I've had here in LA are made with Weyermann Bohemian and the other half made with Weyermann Barke
Hmmm, those two malts are quite a bit more expensive than Best, Avangard, Viking, and the American malts that they could use- at least at the homebrew level. I guess they think the difference in the beer is worth the extra expense.

Nothing against Weyermann. I like them, but I only brew 3 gallons at a time so the extra cost feels negligible to me.

Yes, Weyermann must be considered a "premium" malt as they command premium prices.
On another forum, there was a post stating the brewer could not tell any difference in the same beer brewed with malts from different companies.

Price does not determine quality
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Grain for a classic German Pils?
« Reply #25 on: October 08, 2021, 09:07:01 am »
Most don't  know that tgere is a second large-ish malster in Bamberg, named Bamberger Malz. Mahrs uses Bamberger Malz.

Coming from Frankfurt on the train you see Wyerman by the tracks. Coming from Munich you  see Bamberger.
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Offline Cliffs

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Re: Grain for a classic German Pils?
« Reply #26 on: October 08, 2021, 09:40:30 am »
I feel like half of the German style pils I've had here in LA are made with Weyermann Bohemian and the other half made with Weyermann Barke

Used the Bohemian Pils malt numerous times, but not the Barke. Can you give some insight on this particular malt?

Barke Pils is my go to pils malt for everything from pils, lager, saison, blonde. compared to weyermann bopils it has more of a sweet white bread flavor and less straw, saltine cracker, hay flavor. It has great brewery performance, clears well, runs off clear and quickly, converts rapidly. To my palate and for my b rewday, Barke Pils is superior to any other pils malt I've ever tried.

Offline Cliffs

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Re: Grain for a classic German Pils?
« Reply #27 on: October 08, 2021, 09:42:06 am »
I feel like half of the German style pils I've had here in LA are made with Weyermann Bohemian and the other half made with Weyermann Barke
Hmmm, those two malts are quite a bit more expensive than Best, Avangard, Viking, and the American malts that they could use- at least at the homebrew level. I guess they think the difference in the beer is worth the extra expense.

Nothing against Weyermann. I like them, but I only brew 3 gallons at a time so the extra cost feels negligible to me.
just my experience, but I HATED viking pils. Took forever to convert, and had a one dimensional straw flavor and took a long time to clear. I will be trying the Rahr North Star pils soon, in hopes of finding a domestic replacement for Barke Pils, I'll keep you posted

Offline Cliffs

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Re: Grain for a classic German Pils?
« Reply #28 on: October 08, 2021, 09:46:26 am »
My advice for a great german pils- sulfate to around 100-150ppm, and use the best quality noble type hops you can find, dont get hung up on varietal; Liberty,  or Mt Hood hops that are in great condition make a MUCH better beer than HMF thats in poor condition (and in my experience, homebrewers get shafted on the quality of alot of imported euro hops). and for the love of all that is holy DONT dry hop.

Offline BrewBama

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Grain for a classic German Pils?
« Reply #29 on: October 08, 2021, 10:02:52 am »
My advice for a great german pils- sulfate to around 100-150ppm, and use the best quality noble type hops you can find, dont get hung up on varietal; Liberty,  or Mt Hood hops that are in great condition make a MUCH better beer than HMF thats in poor condition (and in my experience, homebrewers get shafted on the quality of alot of imported euro hops). and for the love of all that is holy DONT dry hop.
I have read not to use sulfates with Noble hops. (Never tried it myself) Interesting you found the opposite works. Cheers! 



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