Author Topic: The Great Resignation  (Read 1371 times)

Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: The Great Resignation
« Reply #30 on: October 18, 2021, 03:49:31 pm »
Huh??? I thought the way to strike it rich and pad your retirement was to invest in a brewery???
Only when you're bought out by Inbev.
I love to go swimmin'
with hairy old women

Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: The Great Resignation
« Reply #31 on: October 24, 2021, 11:40:12 am »
Well, I announced my retirement date this week.  It is still a few months away, but I feels weird to know that I will not have to drag myself into the office anymore.

Offline denny

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Re: The Great Resignation
« Reply #32 on: October 24, 2021, 12:42:47 pm »
Well, I announced my retirement date this week.  It is still a few months away, but I feels weird to know that I will not have to drag myself into the office anymore.

Congratulations, buddy!
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline majorvices

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Re: The Great Resignation
« Reply #33 on: October 25, 2021, 02:08:58 am »
Well, I announced my retirement date this week.  It is still a few months away, but I feels weird to know that I will not have to drag myself into the office anymore.

Congratulations! I have a pension coming up in 10-12 years. But I honestly love my work and doubt I'll ever be fully retired.It would be nice to be partially retired and still be paid, however. ;)

Offline erockrph

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Re: The Great Resignation
« Reply #34 on: October 25, 2021, 07:46:43 am »
Well, I announced my retirement date this week.  It is still a few months away, but I feels weird to know that I will not have to drag myself into the office anymore.
Nice! Now you can spend all your time running a yeast bank  ;D
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: The Great Resignation
« Reply #35 on: October 25, 2021, 03:08:27 pm »
Nice! Now you can spend all your time running a yeast bank  ;D

While I am not writing it off, I do not see another yeast bank in my future.   I am going to spend the first few months finding a new normal.

Offline jeffy

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Re: The Great Resignation
« Reply #36 on: October 25, 2021, 03:13:51 pm »
I'm trying to extricate myself from the business I started in 1984.  It's tricky.
I hope to find a "new normal" as well.
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
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Offline denny

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Re: The Great Resignation
« Reply #37 on: October 25, 2021, 03:46:33 pm »
I'm trying to extricate myself from the business I started in 1984.  It's tricky.
I hope to find a "new normal" as well.

Good luck!  Hope you find a way to make it work.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline tommymorris

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Re: The Great Resignation
« Reply #38 on: October 25, 2021, 07:01:40 pm »
Good luck, guys.

I think we are all witnessing history. Covid-19 led to the great resignation and who knows what else. Crazy times.  But, hopefully a lot of good will come.

Offline MNWayne

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Re: The Great Resignation
« Reply #39 on: October 28, 2021, 09:47:30 am »
I retired about 6 months ago and am busier than ever.  I don't know how I got things done before retirement with work always getting in the way.  If you can, retire, if you can't, save hard for it.
Far better to dare mighty things....

Offline nateo

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Re: The Great Resignation
« Reply #40 on: November 10, 2021, 01:04:38 pm »
I've quit two jobs so far during covid. I'm making 50% more money and get 100% more PTO than I did two years ago. This is the best time to quit a job in decades. People complain about "job hoppers" but those numbers speak for themselves. A lot of employers have relied on inertia to keep people around when they pay below-market wages and it's finally catching up with them.
In der Kürze liegt die Würze.

Offline fredthecat

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Re: The Great Resignation
« Reply #41 on: November 10, 2021, 01:15:12 pm »
I've quit two jobs so far during covid. I'm making 50% more money and get 100% more PTO than I did two years ago. This is the best time to quit a job in decades. People complain about "job hoppers" but those numbers speak for themselves. A lot of employers have relied on inertia to keep people around when they pay below-market wages and it's finally catching up with them.

i was a long term, serial job hopper for better salary/hours/etc, longest i worked at a place was about 2 years. however it is awful on a resume for a lot of fields. ymmv

Offline Visor

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Re: The Great Resignation
« Reply #42 on: November 11, 2021, 02:03:41 pm »
Huh??? I thought the way to strike it rich and pad your retirement was to invest in a brewery???

   You have it bassckwards, you strike it rich so you can open a brewery.
   I've always tried to avoid putting all my eggs in one basket, you never know how life will play out for you. After paying off my house in '89 I made sure I maxed out my Roth and HSA every year, later when I went to work for an outfit that offered a 401K I maxed out the employer contribution every year. After exiting my business 6 1/2 years ago, with no W-2 wages I could only contribute to the HSA. By that time the ACA had driven my health insurance premiums up by over 300% so I said the hell with it and took the subsidy. To qualify though you must show a minimum income, which I didn't have. The 401K then proved invaluable as I could roll just enough of it over to a Roth every year to qualify. In 5 years with my previous employer I contributed just < $10,000 into the account, at it's peak a year ago it was worth >$105,000. The crazy thing is that I was the only employee participating in the 401K, all the other guys had myriad excuses/reasons for not taking part, most said they couldn't afford to. Funny thing is those same guys could afford to spent $5 or $10 for lunch every day while I was eating my cold sammich, kind of the ant and the grasshopper thing I guess. For that much $ in savings though I can stick with cold sammys.
   As for not being able to touch 401K money for 5 years after rolling them over, that's not entirely true, I just sold some yesterday that had been in the Roth for less than 5 years in order to pay off my building. I will have to pay some tax on the value increase since rolling, but at this point my tax bill is so negligible I won't worry about it. As with all things IRS, there is no one single answer to a general question.
I spent most of my money on beer, tools and guns, the rest I foolishly squandered on stupid stuff!

Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: The Great Resignation
« Reply #43 on: November 24, 2021, 04:02:00 pm »
What is amazing is that after 42 years of software and hardware engineering, I will be free to engage in the passions of my life.  I enlisted in the U.S. Navy straight out of high school in 1979.  I attended basic training in Great Lakes, Illinois followed by Naval computer school in California.  I was originally trained as a technician, but I went on to earning bachelor of science and master of science degrees in computer science and engineering.  I do not regret the path I took because it prepared me with bench skills that few engineers who go to directly to college after high school possess after they graduate from college.  College was more about filling in the "why" holes that my "how to" technician training provided.  I personally believe that is why the American educational system is failing so many students.  Kids, especially male kids, need to learn by doing.  In doing, they will form quite a list of "why" lists.  Formal education is about "why."  Practical experience is about "how."  Engineering as a discipline is about theory + practice.  Brewing is about theory + practice.  A lot of new brewers try to equate brewing with cooking, but it is closer to baking.  Baking involves considerably more science than cooking. Brewers who lack fundamentals are limited brewers.

Offline fredthecat

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Re: The Great Resignation
« Reply #44 on: November 24, 2021, 08:44:50 pm »
What is amazing is that after 42 years of software and hardware engineering, I will be free to engage in the passions of my life.  I enlisted in the U.S. Navy straight out of high school in 1979.  I attended basic training in Great Lakes, Illinois followed by Naval computer school in California.  I was originally trained as a technician, but I went on to earning bachelor of science and master of science degrees in computer science and engineering.  I do not regret the path I took because it prepared me with bench skills that few engineers who go to directly to college after high school possess after they graduate from college.  College was more about filling in the "why" holes that my "how to" technician training provided.  I personally believe that is why the American educational system is failing so many students.  Kids, especially male kids, need to learn by doing.  In doing, they will form quite a list of "why" lists.  Formal education is about "why."  Practical experience is about "how."  Engineering as a discipline is about theory + practice.  Brewing is about theory + practice.  A lot of new brewers try to equate brewing with cooking, but it is closer to baking.  Baking involves considerably more science than cooking. Brewers who lack fundamentals are limited brewers.

I do not have personal experience with the European systems, but in particular in Germany, students are pretty forcefully streamed at a young age into what levels of education are appropriate for them. This may not be true, but its what I believe I have heard. Essentially by age 15 it is very clear if you are going to be working in a hands-on/trade job or if you will be matriculating into a gymnasium and continued higher education. In Canada at least when I was in school there was zero attempt to really fit kids into practical paths for their life.

Not every kid should attend university or even college. That's why we were and still somewhat are severely lacking good blue collar jobs and skilled tradespeople. Considering the extention of human lifespan in the west, especially ability to work into late 60s and 70s easily, we should really re-evaluate the entire birth-school-highschool-college-"job" life path that is set out. A good one could be essentially birth-school-2 years of highschool-mandatory government service for a year or two (police/govt worker/military) - "tier 1 job" that is fairly physical, taking advantage of their youth. after 5 or 10 years of this type of work they may consider if they want to learn more, continue their education or not. if so they will study the equivalent of REAL, critical and challenging college (not 18-24 year old daycare with participation medals), and move further into understanding the world and how things work.

just some thoughts.