Author Topic: Viability of Yeast  (Read 1405 times)

Online BrewBama

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Re: Viability of Yeast
« Reply #15 on: February 22, 2022, 06:20:24 pm »
Dry yeast and yeast from a starter are in different metabolic states. Dry yeast has been processed in such a way that it has all the reserves it needs to grow and reproduce for several generations so you don't need to provide any oxygen when you pitch it. Once you make a starter you have taken it into the growth phase and used up most or all of those reserves so you will need to oxygenate or aerate your wort, just as for liquid yeast. You have wiped out one of the advantages of dry yeast, which is probably why it is not recommended. If you need to test the yeast, though, go ahead and do it.

You are correct.


… which is why the below propagation tech sheet instructs the brewer to oxygenate.


https://www.lallemandbrewing.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/LAL-bestpractices-Propagation-digital.pdf

Essentially how to make a yeast starter for dry yeast from Lallemand.

Offline MDL

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Re: Viability of Yeast
« Reply #16 on: February 24, 2022, 04:38:04 am »
I reached out to Lallemand about the propagation protocol for Diamond lager yeast. Specifically asking about step three where it says to oxygenate at 1-1.2 Lpm for 24 hours. They confirmed to provide oxygenation/aeration continuously for that 24 hour period.

narvin

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Re: Viability of Yeast
« Reply #17 on: February 24, 2022, 05:23:49 am »
I reached out to Lallemand about the propagation protocol for Diamond lager yeast. Specifically asking about step three where it says to oxygenate at 1-1.2 Lpm for 24 hours. They confirmed to provide oxygenation/aeration continuously for that 24 hour period.

That's like a whole 5lb tank of oxygen.  While that may be appropriate for a 100HL batch, it seems like overkill at home. Try SNS or, if you still believe in it, your trusty old stir plate.

Offline erockrph

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Re: Viability of Yeast
« Reply #18 on: February 24, 2022, 11:36:54 am »
I reached out to Lallemand about the propagation protocol for Diamond lager yeast. Specifically asking about step three where it says to oxygenate at 1-1.2 Lpm for 24 hours. They confirmed to provide oxygenation/aeration continuously for that 24 hour period.

That's like a whole 5lb tank of oxygen.  While that may be appropriate for a 100HL batch, it seems like overkill at home. Try SNS or, if you still believe in it, your trusty old stir plate.
Or pitch another pack or two of dry yeast and skip the whole propagation process...
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Re: Viability of Yeast
« Reply #19 on: February 24, 2022, 11:44:18 am »
I reached out to Lallemand about the propagation protocol for Diamond lager yeast. Specifically asking about step three where it says to oxygenate at 1-1.2 Lpm for 24 hours. They confirmed to provide oxygenation/aeration continuously for that 24 hour period.

That's like a whole 5lb tank of oxygen.  While that may be appropriate for a 100HL batch, it seems like overkill at home. Try SNS or, if you still believe in it, your trusty old stir plate.
Or pitch another pack or two of dry yeast and skip the whole propagation process...

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Online BrewBama

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Re: Viability of Yeast
« Reply #20 on: February 24, 2022, 01:49:34 pm »
I reached out to Lallemand about the propagation protocol for Diamond lager yeast. Specifically asking about step three where it says to oxygenate at 1-1.2 Lpm for 24 hours. They confirmed to provide oxygenation/aeration continuously for that 24 hour period.

That's like a whole 5lb tank of oxygen.  While that may be appropriate for a 100HL batch, it seems like overkill at home. Try SNS or, if you still believe in it, your trusty old stir plate.
Or pitch another pack or two of dry yeast and skip the whole propagation process...
I agree. They have an app for that. With OG, temp, and volume taken into consideration, many times it’s not even a whole extra pack and others it’s more than two.  https://www.lallemandbrewing.com/en/united-states/brewers-corner/brewing-tools/pitching-rate-calculator/

narvin

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Re: Viability of Yeast
« Reply #21 on: February 24, 2022, 03:18:03 pm »
Agreed, I've never made a starter with dry yeast, but if I did I wouldn't waste my oxygen tank on it!

Offline MDL

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Re: Viability of Yeast
« Reply #22 on: February 24, 2022, 08:39:23 pm »
I imagined the protocol using sterile filtered air for this step and not pure O2?