Author Topic: Let's Discuss Dry Yeast  (Read 8359 times)

Offline ttash

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Re: Let's Discuss Dry Yeast
« Reply #30 on: November 01, 2021, 10:22:13 pm »
I get the same tartness others have mentioned using W34/70, it's subtle, but definitely there, so now I use Diamond. I'm amazed at how good it is.
For clean ales BRY-97 does the trick every time.
I still haven't found a dry English strain that I  really like, nothing that gives me the character I get from WY1968, but I'll keep looking.
For phenolic strains like Belgian or Hefeweizen it's liquid yeasts only because in my experience dry cultures don't even come close.
Right now I'm using dry yeast 90% of the time.

Offline MDL

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Re: Let's Discuss Dry Yeast
« Reply #31 on: November 02, 2021, 01:55:45 am »
Bry97 and Diamond lager for most of my beers now. Tried Munich classic but prefer 3068 for Hefeweizen. The Munich classic was too phenolic and too flocculant.

Offline denny

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Re: Let's Discuss Dry Yeast
« Reply #32 on: November 02, 2021, 08:31:44 am »
Dave, S189 is the Hurliman yeast, so I wouldn't expect it to be a liit like Diamond.
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Offline tommymorris

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Re: Let's Discuss Dry Yeast
« Reply #33 on: November 02, 2021, 08:57:56 am »
I get the same tartness others have mentioned using W34/70, it's subtle, but definitely there, so now I use Diamond. I'm amazed at how good it is.
For clean ales BRY-97 does the trick every time.
I still haven't found a dry English strain that I  really like, nothing that gives me the character I get from WY1968, but I'll keep looking.
For phenolic strains like Belgian or Hefeweizen it's liquid yeasts only because in my experience dry cultures don't even come close.
Right now I'm using dry yeast 90% of the time.
I’ve been trying dry English yeast options. But, I think I eventually will just go to buying a pack of 1968 each winter and keeping the slurry alive through the summer.

Online Iliff Ave

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Re: Let's Discuss Dry Yeast
« Reply #34 on: November 02, 2021, 09:17:31 am »
I wish rite brew would carry diamond because their prices are more in line with what I want. I still use 34/70 and 189 because of this...
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Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: Let's Discuss Dry Yeast
« Reply #35 on: November 02, 2021, 09:20:17 am »

 i agree with the types repeated by many, but would add k-97.

i fermented it cool and it was a very clean yeast that had an incredibly persistent haze and made the hops pop pretty well. people label it as "german ale/kolsch/alt" whatever, but i see it as a NEIPA potential yeast or IPA. i'd love to hear recent and more feedback from people who used it.
[/quote]
I recently used it in an American wheat beer where it got up to 74f with no ill effects.
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Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: Let's Discuss Dry Yeast
« Reply #36 on: November 02, 2021, 09:23:19 am »
I wish rite brew would carry diamond because their prices are more in line with what I want. I still use 34/70 and 189 because of this...
Keep an eye on Label Peelers for sales. Their price on dry yeast includes free shipping via the post office.
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Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Re: Let's Discuss Dry Yeast
« Reply #37 on: November 02, 2021, 05:02:53 pm »
I wish rite brew would carry diamond because their prices are more in line with what I want. I still use 34/70 and 189 because of this...
Keep an eye on Label Peelers for sales. Their price on dry yeast includes free shipping via the post office.

The only issue with Label Peelers is their stock tends to be old. But some here say age is no issue...and that's what I tell my wife.
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Let's Discuss Dry Yeast
« Reply #38 on: November 02, 2021, 07:07:19 pm »
I just had an amazing revelation....... I just finished off a pint of my Diamond dunkel, and while it was very good, it had a lingering tartness which I think is my own fault, the mash pH turned out way too low but I just let it ride that way through the whole brewing and fermentation...... but then near the end of drinking this pint, I wondered, what happens if I dip my finger into some baking soda and mix that in.  WOW, what a difference that made!!!  Turned a good beer into a great one!!!  I'm amazed at what that did.  I ran a few numbers, and it seems... I should be able to duplicate this again by adding about 1/64 tsp baking soda in each pint.  I'll experiment with this to see how well it works.  And next time... well jeez... anytime I plan to use any dry yeast, I shall do what I know is right and mash at about 5.6 to 5.7 instead of letting it ride at 5.3, which is just too low (flamers be damned).

Cheers all.
Dave

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Offline BrewBama

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Let's Discuss Dry Yeast
« Reply #39 on: November 02, 2021, 07:11:17 pm »
I just had an amazing revelation....... I just finished off a pint of my Diamond dunkel, and while it was very good, it had a lingering tartness which I think is my own fault, the mash pH turned out way too low but I just let it ride that way through the whole brewing and fermentation...... but then near the end of drinking this pint, I wondered, what happens if I dip my finger into some baking soda and mix that in.  WOW, what a difference that made!!!  Turned a good beer into a great one!!!  I'm amazed at what that did.  I ran a few numbers, and it seems... I should be able to duplicate this again by adding about 1/64 tsp baking soda in each pint.  I'll experiment with this to see how well it works.  And next time... well jeez... anytime I plan to use any dry yeast, I shall do what I know is right and mash at about 5.6 to 5.7 instead of letting it ride at 5.3, which is just too low (flamers be damned).

Cheers all.
I’m a 5.5 man myself (..or at least that’s my target)



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Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Re: Let's Discuss Dry Yeast
« Reply #40 on: November 02, 2021, 08:39:03 pm »
Count me as the "odd man out". Never took a pH reading. In decades of brewing.
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Offline ScallyWag

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Re: Let's Discuss Dry Yeast
« Reply #41 on: November 02, 2021, 09:13:18 pm »
I'm a newbie and still rather inexperienced about beer styles in general (much less how to make them) so I have thus far stuck to dry yeasts only.  I'm experimenting mostly with malts, to learn those better, and a few basic dry yeasts, and once I feel like I have a better handle on who does what to my beer, maybe I'll expand into liquid yeasts. 

As it is, nearly every batch I do is a split-batch, with 2 or 3 small FVs, trying out the same grain bill with different yeasts. 

So far, I've tried US-05, Nottingham, Windsor, Verdant, Belle Saison, B-134, Kveik Voss, and various blends thereof.  Comparing them pairwise against each other, seeing which works best for me in what grain-bill.  So I am generally getting at least 3 different beers out of each mash. 

In queue but not yet tried, I have Diamond Lager, S-189 [waiting for winter temperatures], Munich Classic, and Danstar Abbaye.

Not really a fan of Nottingham; US-05 is sort of my basic blank canvas control condition, and my favorite so far is probably Windsor, but I'm thinking Verdant could soon be my new favorite. 

I don't have the discerning palate of most of you folks, but I am rather pleased (and frankly, surprised) at how much I like the beers I've made (except for one).  I'll bet I'd be perfectly happy with using just 3 or 4 different dry yeasts for the rest of my life (#BeerSlut) but it is fun to experiment, so I may eventually get around to trying liquid yeasts.  Not in a hurry though. 

That said, I do love reading the reviews and advice from all of you who are more experienced/discerning than I am.  It informs my choices and guides my experimentation. 

Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Re: Let's Discuss Dry Yeast
« Reply #42 on: November 03, 2021, 04:44:52 am »
To echo the above, we are at a point where 1 or perhaps 2 yeast types are all we use. Brewing nearly all lagers, the widely popular Diamond Lager yeast is our go-to brand. Everything from Vienna Lager to Bitter German Pils to Festbiers.
It has performed very well in a recent Schwartzbier.

The ale yeast used most recently is Fermentis S-04. English Ale. It did spectacular in two English Barleywines and an English Imperial Stout. These came in at over 10% ABV.

That's about it. Two yeasts are all we need. And these are dry yeasts. But as stated, we harvest the yeast multiple times. Each generation seems to perform better than the previous generation, especially after the initial pitch, that is, starting with the 2nd generation.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2021, 06:39:08 am by TXFlyGuy »
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Online fredthecat

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Re: Let's Discuss Dry Yeast
« Reply #43 on: November 03, 2021, 06:51:14 am »
To echo the above, we are at a point where 1 or perhaps 2 yeast types are all we use.

Why limit yourself(ves)?

Offline BrewBama

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Let's Discuss Dry Yeast
« Reply #44 on: November 03, 2021, 07:24:22 am »
To echo the above, we are at a point where 1 or perhaps 2 yeast types are all we use.

Why limit yourself(ves)?
The Paradox of Choice: Instead of increasing our freedom to have what we want, the paradox of choice suggests that having too many choices actually limits our freedom. Learning to choose is hard. Learning to choose well is harder. And learning to choose well in a world of unlimited possibilities is harder still, perhaps too hard.

In my case, I’d rather have extensive experience with a handful of strains that I am comfortable with and can count on consistent results than have to guess at predicted outcomes of too many options.

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« Last Edit: November 03, 2021, 07:27:12 am by BrewBama »