Author Topic: Terms in Brewing  (Read 900 times)

Offline majorvices

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Re: Terms in Brewing
« Reply #15 on: December 10, 2021, 05:26:39 pm »
We have a chain liquor store that sells single bottles and cans, which seems like a good way to explore styles by tasting a variety of commercial examples. However, the beer is not properly refrigerated during shipping and sits on open shelves at room temperature in the store. That means you might get a very stale sample that doesn't properly reflect the style.

Actually as I understand, hops make a pretty good preservative.  So, I would agree that age may play a roll in the longevity of freshness, so too would the IBU characteristic of the beer.  An IPA, for example, would have a longer shelf life than a porter.  But unless that beer on the shelf is many years old, it should still be a good representative of the style — IMHO.

As mentioned, IPAs have some of the shortest shelf life due to the volatility of hop aroma ad it's susceptibility to oxygen deterioration. Porters actually have a fairly long shelf life. Dark malts have been known to show anti-oxidation properties.

Offline fredthecat

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Re: Terms in Brewing
« Reply #16 on: December 10, 2021, 07:37:17 pm »
We have a chain liquor store that sells single bottles and cans, which seems like a good way to explore styles by tasting a variety of commercial examples. However, the beer is not properly refrigerated during shipping and sits on open shelves at room temperature in the store. That means you might get a very stale sample that doesn't properly reflect the style.

Actually as I understand, hops make a pretty good preservative.  So, I would agree that age may play a roll in the longevity of freshness, so too would the IBU characteristic of the beer.  An IPA, for example, would have a longer shelf life than a porter.  But unless that beer on the shelf is many years old, it should still be a good representative of the style — IMHO.

As mentioned, IPAs have some of the shortest shelf life due to the volatility of hop aroma ad it's susceptibility to oxygen deterioration. Porters actually have a fairly long shelf life. Dark malts have been known to show anti-oxidation properties.

i guess one benefit of the ontario beer monopoly is that the beer is almost always stored pretty well. the beer store (only sells beer and cider) keeps the entire store chilled to something like 60F, so you always feel a chill when you walk in, and so everything on the shelf is chilled enough to drink immediately. the newer/better LCBO stores have a section of the store with an automatic door that is entirely chilled like this for beer, white wine cider etc.

so the euro beers i get to taste, as ive said many times are the only thing worth buying. i know ive been spoilt by a wide variety of german lagers/pilsners always in good shape for an okay price.

Offline KellerBrauer

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Re: Terms in Brewing
« Reply #17 on: December 11, 2021, 12:29:56 pm »
We have a chain liquor store that sells single bottles and cans, which seems like a good way to explore styles by tasting a variety of commercial examples. However, the beer is not properly refrigerated during shipping and sits on open shelves at room temperature in the store. That means you might get a very stale sample that doesn't properly reflect the style.

Actually as I understand, hops make a pretty good preservative.  So, I would agree that age may play a roll in the longevity of freshness, so too would the IBU characteristic of the beer.  An IPA, for example, would have a longer shelf life than a porter.  But unless that beer on the shelf is many years old, it should still be a good representative of the style — IMHO.

As mentioned, IPAs have some of the shortest shelf life due to the volatility of hop aroma ad it's susceptibility to oxygen deterioration. Porters actually have a fairly long shelf life. Dark malts have been known to show anti-oxidation properties.

We have a chain liquor store that sells single bottles and cans, which seems like a good way to explore styles by tasting a variety of commercial examples. However, the beer is not properly refrigerated during shipping and sits on open shelves at room temperature in the store. That means you might get a very stale sample that doesn't properly reflect the style.

Actually as I understand, hops make a pretty good preservative.  So, I would agree that age may play a roll in the longevity of freshness, so too would the IBU characteristic of the beer.  An IPA, for example, would have a longer shelf life than a porter.  But unless that beer on the shelf is many years old, it should still be a good representative of the style — IMHO.
I think you have it backwards. Hops act as an antibacterial preservative, but hop aroma and flavor are known to degrade quickly. IPAs should be consumed fresh, within a month of packaging or 2-3 months at the longest. Porters and stouts are more tolerant of the flavors from oxidation, and the sherry-like notes can actually work in them. Some of these can be good for years. I have tried European beers from this chain and they were almost all heavily oxidized and yucky. It only takes a few days of overheating to ruin a beer.

Well there you go!  At age 64 and brewing for nearly 10 years, I learned something new!!

Thanks Brewers!!
Joliet, IL

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