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Author Topic: coldest reliably fermenting ale yeasts?  (Read 1860 times)

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: coldest reliably fermenting ale yeasts?
« Reply #15 on: December 29, 2021, 04:32:49 pm »
As a stupid experiment I've gotten 1056, 001, US-05 into the upper 30's F and they still fermented fine.

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Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: coldest reliably fermenting ale yeasts?
« Reply #16 on: December 30, 2021, 08:48:45 am »
As a stupid experiment I've gotten 1056, 001, US-05 into the upper 30's F and they still fermented fine.
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Offline brewthru

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Re: coldest reliably fermenting ale yeasts?
« Reply #17 on: December 31, 2021, 03:13:09 pm »
I had same results with US-05. Mid 30's/lower 40's.

Haven't experimented with WLP001.

Realize I mistyped in my original post in that I included WLP001.

Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Re: coldest reliably fermenting ale yeasts?
« Reply #18 on: January 03, 2022, 05:40:30 am »
As a stupid experiment I've gotten 1056, 001, US-05 into the upper 30's F and they still fermented fine.

I love this.

A Siebel Institute graduate and the former head brewer at the Hofbrau, in Addison Texas, always used Wyeast 1056 for their house lagers. Not sure the ferment temp, but it was cold, probably around 50 F.
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Offline fredthecat

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Re: coldest reliably fermenting ale yeasts?
« Reply #19 on: January 06, 2022, 12:20:48 pm »
1.
I'm looking more strongly at WLP800/838, wlp028 or nottingham. (all cerevisiae, not lagers)

I'm one of those nottingham haters from an awful experience, but that was very early on in my brewing and more than a decade ago. It's also cheap and easy(dry yeast), so might give it a go.

2.
at those who were suggesting S-05/WLP001 etc, so how did it attenuate at those sub 50 temps? Did you do a d-rest or bring the temp up later?

3.
after reading a fair bit about these and other yeasts, i think a key thing missing in my initial query is the pitch rate. reading about people using these yeasts and others, if its the "right" yeast for a cold temp and its an insufficient pitch there will be problems. i would bet that many yeasts with a higher pitch rate (the lager "double" starter size or 2packs of dry) would do sufficiently well at cold temps.


4. now considering the pitch rate increase concept, maybe i'll try the windsor/nottingham combination and see how that goes.

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Re: coldest reliably fermenting ale yeasts?
« Reply #20 on: January 06, 2022, 12:35:27 pm »
As a stupid experiment I've gotten 1056, 001, US-05 into the upper 30's F and they still fermented fine.

I love this.

A Siebel Institute graduate and the former head brewer at the Hofbrau, in Addison Texas, always used Wyeast 1056 for their house lagers. Not sure the ferment temp, but it was cold, probably around 50 F.

I find that hard to believe considering they claim to brew it according to the German purity law and call them lagers.  They either import their beers or brew them with German recipes.

Offline fredthecat

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Re: coldest reliably fermenting ale yeasts?
« Reply #21 on: January 06, 2022, 12:42:28 pm »
As a stupid experiment I've gotten 1056, 001, US-05 into the upper 30's F and they still fermented fine.

I love this.

A Siebel Institute graduate and the former head brewer at the Hofbrau, in Addison Texas, always used Wyeast 1056 for their house lagers. Not sure the ferment temp, but it was cold, probably around 50 F.

I find that hard to believe considering they claim to brew it according to the German purity law and call them lagers.  They either import their beers or brew them with German recipes.

look, they may not make perfect examples of classic german pilsner, but i heard from someone that they are the best german pilsners outside of germany. i wonder if they use water treatment?