Author Topic: Liquid yeast vs dry yeast  (Read 1249 times)

Offline redrocker652002

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Liquid yeast vs dry yeast
« on: January 19, 2022, 09:32:43 pm »
Hey all,

My next brew is going to be a Blind Pig IPA clone.  I have only used dry yeast so far, but am thinking of diving into the liquid yeast arena.  Do I simply make sure the package is at room temp, slap it to break it open and pour in?  I know I am probably making this seem way to simple, but I just want to make sure.  If this is something that might be over my head, I will go with dry again.  I used US-05 the last time and want to try something different to see what it might bring to the party, so to speak.  Any input would be welcomed.  Thank you

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Liquid yeast vs dry yeast
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2022, 04:50:30 am »
If you are using Wyeast, you should smack the pack a day or two prior to brew day, to give the yeast time to wake up.  The package should swell from CO2 production, indicating that it is alive and ready to go.

With Wyeast packs like that, if they swell up within 24 hours, I usually don't make a starter.  But if it seems sluggish, or if using White Labs yeast, then I would usually be an advocate to making a yeast starter...

There are instructions in books and online for how to make a yeast starter.  It is really just a small batch of wort that, once again, you make a day or two in advance, to give the yeast a chance to wake up and begin to multiply.

Personally I am a small batch brewer of 2 gallons or less.  In this case, I don't need to make a starter, but it's still never a bad idea.  If brewing 5 gallons, I would make a starter as detailed above.

If you need any advice on which strains are favorites based on the style of beer that you are trying to brew, let us know -- homebrewers have lots of opinions on that topic!

Cheers!
Dave

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Offline pete b

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Re: Liquid yeast vs dry yeast
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2022, 07:25:33 am »
I never smacked a pack two days ahead (except in cases when I have a really old one and I am seeing if it's viable so I can make a starter the night before), in fact I usually do it the night before and get swelling overnight. I'm not saying it's wrong but it seems unnecessary in most cases and I would think the yeast would be more active after 12-18 hours than 48 hours.
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Offline Megary

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Re: Liquid yeast vs dry yeast
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2022, 07:27:58 am »
If you are using Wyeast, you should smack the pack a day or two prior to brew day, to give the yeast time to wake up.  The package should swell from CO2 production, indicating that it is alive and ready to go.

With Wyeast packs like that, if they swell up within 24 hours, I usually don't make a starter.  But if it seems sluggish, or if using White Labs yeast, then I would usually be an advocate to making a yeast starter...

There are instructions in books and online for how to make a yeast starter.  It is really just a small batch of wort that, once again, you make a day or two in advance, to give the yeast a chance to wake up and begin to multiply.

Personally I am a small batch brewer of 2 gallons or less.  In this case, I don't need to make a starter, but it's still never a bad idea.  If brewing 5 gallons, I would make a starter as detailed above.

If you need any advice on which strains are favorites based on the style of beer that you are trying to brew, let us know -- homebrewers have lots of opinions on that topic!

Cheers!
I also brew small batches (2.5gal) and I would agree with all of this except that if using Wyeast and their Smack Packs, I usually take them out of the fridge and smack them right when I start heating my water for brew day.  I'll leave them at room temperature and 4 to 4-1/2 hours later I pitch them, assuming I see some swelling from the pack.  For the record, I have only had one pack not swell after this amount of time and I pitched it anyway.  That turned out to be a mistake as it never took off even after 54 hours.

For 5 gallon batches, maybe a longer activation time would be better??  I really don't know.

From Wyeast:
INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PROPER USE OF ACTIVATOR™ PACKAGES:
Remove Activator from refrigeration (34-40 °F, 1-4 °C) and allow to come to room temperature just prior to use.
To activate, locate and move the inner pouch to a corner. Place this area in palm of one hand and firmly smack the package with the other hand to break the inner nutrient pouch. Confirm the inner pouch is broken. If you do not require proof of activity, proceed to the 5th step and Direct Pitch. Contents of inner pouch do not need to be transferred to your wort when not Activated.
Shake the package well to release the nutrients.
Allow the package to swell for 3-5 hours or more (it is not necessary for this package to fully swell before use) at ambient temperature (approx. 70 °F, 21 °C).
Use sanitizing solution to sanitize the package before opening.
Shake well, open and pour the Activator™ into 5 gallons (19 L) of well-aerated or oxygenated wort up to 1.060 OG at 65-72 °F (18-22 °C). Maintain temperature until fermentation is evident by CO₂ bubble formation, bubbling airlock, or foaming on top of wort. For high gravity or low temperature fermentations, additional yeast may be required.
Adjust to desired fermentation temperature. For more information on temperature selection, visit our YEAST STRAINS section and select the strain being used.

Offline Iliff Ave

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Re: Liquid yeast vs dry yeast
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2022, 07:38:11 am »
Stick with dry yeast  ;D
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Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: Liquid yeast vs dry yeast
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2022, 08:04:35 am »
Stick with dry yeast  ;D
👆👆👆
The only liquid yeast I've used in many years was Wyeast 1450 for a batch of Denny's wry ipa.
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Offline fredthecat

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Re: Liquid yeast vs dry yeast
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2022, 08:46:57 am »
Hey all,

My next brew is going to be a Blind Pig IPA clone.  I have only used dry yeast so far, but am thinking of diving into the liquid yeast arena.  Do I simply make sure the package is at room temp, slap it to break it open and pour in?  I know I am probably making this seem way to simple, but I just want to make sure.  If this is something that might be over my head, I will go with dry again.  I used US-05 the last time and want to try something different to see what it might bring to the party, so to speak.  Any input would be welcomed.  Thank you

i think the main draw for people who have only used dry yeast (i only had access to dry for a long, long time) is the many different types of liquid yeast. however, after now having tried probably about 10 different liquid yeasts in addition to the dry i've always used i've found a lot of them are really not something i would want as my everyday drink.

for sure try them imho, it's not that difficult (and if youre 3.5 gallons or under you can likely do a direct pitch / omega and i think imperial state they have enough cells [some people focus on "viability"] for 5 gallons), but i guess my one advice is that say yeasts like WLP510 or WLP005 may seem exciting but are not commonly used for a reason, and ones like WLP001 are
used by everyone - making them seem pedestrian - but they are used by everyone for good reasons.

go with the flow and you likely won't be disappointed when choosing yeast.

Offline redrocker652002

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Re: Liquid yeast vs dry yeast
« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2022, 09:01:27 am »
If you are using Wyeast, you should smack the pack a day or two prior to brew day, to give the yeast time to wake up.  The package should swell from CO2 production, indicating that it is alive and ready to go.

With Wyeast packs like that, if they swell up within 24 hours, I usually don't make a starter.  But if it seems sluggish, or if using White Labs yeast, then I would usually be an advocate to making a yeast starter...

There are instructions in books and online for how to make a yeast starter.  It is really just a small batch of wort that, once again, you make a day or two in advance, to give the yeast a chance to wake up and begin to multiply.

Personally I am a small batch brewer of 2 gallons or less.  In this case, I don't need to make a starter, but it's still never a bad idea.  If brewing 5 gallons, I would make a starter as detailed above.

If you need any advice on which strains are favorites based on the style of beer that you are trying to brew, let us know -- homebrewers have lots of opinions on that topic!

Cheers!

I was going to ask about different styles and options for the IPA type of beer.  Like I said, I am torn between buying the individual ingredients and trying my hand at that, or buying a kit from Austin Home Brew and having everything, including the yeast options already picked out.  So, I guess I am going to ask, which yeast (dry or Liquid) would you all use for an IPA in the family of Blind Pig? 

I typically have been making 5 gallon batches, so I will look into the starter and what I need to do there.  I went to Youtube and checked it out a little, but did not dive in as far as I probably should have. 

Thanks to all who replied and offered info.  I really appreciate it. 

Offline fredthecat

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Re: Liquid yeast vs dry yeast
« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2022, 09:05:47 am »
If you are using Wyeast, you should smack the pack a day or two prior to brew day, to give the yeast time to wake up.  The package should swell from CO2 production, indicating that it is alive and ready to go.

With Wyeast packs like that, if they swell up within 24 hours, I usually don't make a starter.  But if it seems sluggish, or if using White Labs yeast, then I would usually be an advocate to making a yeast starter...

There are instructions in books and online for how to make a yeast starter.  It is really just a small batch of wort that, once again, you make a day or two in advance, to give the yeast a chance to wake up and begin to multiply.

Personally I am a small batch brewer of 2 gallons or less.  In this case, I don't need to make a starter, but it's still never a bad idea.  If brewing 5 gallons, I would make a starter as detailed above.

If you need any advice on which strains are favorites based on the style of beer that you are trying to brew, let us know -- homebrewers have lots of opinions on that topic!

Cheers!

I was going to ask about different styles and options for the IPA type of beer.  Like I said, I am torn between buying the individual ingredients and trying my hand at that, or buying a kit from Austin Home Brew and having everything, including the yeast options already picked out.  So, I guess I am going to ask, which yeast (dry or Liquid) would you all use for an IPA in the family of Blind Pig? 

I typically have been making 5 gallon batches, so I will look into the starter and what I need to do there.  I went to Youtube and checked it out a little, but did not dive in as far as I probably should have. 

Thanks to all who replied and offered info.  I really appreciate it.

i would go with the kit, ive never had blind pig, but the recommended yeast is WLP001, which is what many, many west coast IPAs use. so if dry US-05 or BRY97 or WLP001/wyeast equivalent.

my 3rd batch was a kit IPA which was extract and steeping grains and i remember really enjoying it

Offline narvin

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Re: Liquid yeast vs dry yeast
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2022, 10:06:01 am »
Stick with dry yeast  ;D

Especially if you like peaches!   ;D

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Liquid yeast vs dry yeast
« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2022, 10:46:07 am »
Stick with dry yeast  ;D

Especially if you like peaches!   ;D

I went away from US-05 years ago due to this noticeable peaches perception, but now that I can ferment under pressure, I might have to give it another try to see if the peaches are avoided under pressure fermentation.
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Offline Megary

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Re: Liquid yeast vs dry yeast
« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2022, 10:54:20 am »
Are you all telling me that if the OP used US-05, an incredibly reliable yeast for fermentation, that he would be able to pick out "peach" through the hops?  I'm quite certain I wouldn't be able to.
Caveats: I have never had Blind Pig and have only rarely used US-05.

Offline denny

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Re: Liquid yeast vs dry yeast
« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2022, 11:34:51 am »
Are you all telling me that if the OP used US-05, an incredibly reliable yeast for fermentation, that he would be able to pick out "peach" through the hops?  I'm quite certain I wouldn't be able to.
Caveats: I have never had Blind Pig and have only rarely used US-05.

I don't know if he would, but I can.
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Offline BrewBama

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Re: Liquid yeast vs dry yeast
« Reply #13 on: January 20, 2022, 11:44:39 am »
There are other dry yeast strains that don’t have a peach taste. Dry ≠ US05

Offline Megary

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Re: Liquid yeast vs dry yeast
« Reply #14 on: January 20, 2022, 11:53:45 am »
Are you all telling me that if the OP used US-05, an incredibly reliable yeast for fermentation, that he would be able to pick out "peach" through the hops?  I'm quite certain I wouldn't be able to.
Caveats: I have never had Blind Pig and have only rarely used US-05.

I don't know if he would, but I can.
To pick out "peach" and pinpoint it to the yeast in a beer that according to Russian River should be "Full-bodied, very hoppy, with citrus, pine, fruity notes, and a nice dry, bitter finish" is a skill indeed.  I tip my hat to you sir!