Author Topic: LalBrew Farmhouse  (Read 2654 times)

Offline coolman26

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Re: LalBrew Farmhouse
« Reply #15 on: January 27, 2022, 02:48:57 pm »
I consistently use yeast that are diastaticus +.  I’ve never had any issues with bottle bombs or problems with other ferments. I brewed with these yeasts long before I knew what diastaticus was. I’ve always used plastic fermenters. Once l learned. about it, I do use marked fermenters for these beers.
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Offline narvin

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Re: LalBrew Farmhouse
« Reply #16 on: January 27, 2022, 03:12:28 pm »
I don't want to say that the issue of cross contamination at the homebrew scale is overblown, but as long as you clean well, it's not a big deal.  I've never had a problem even with Brett.


Offline erockrph

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Re: LalBrew Farmhouse
« Reply #17 on: January 27, 2022, 03:17:20 pm »
the only reason to use this yeast is if you're worried about diastatic cross contamination-a legitimate worry on the commercial side, but Im not sure how concerned us homerewers need to be
I feel that those who bottle condition should be concerned about diastaticus - possible bottle bombs.

When I bottle Belgian beers, I use Belgian bottles because I aim for high carbonation, but I've never seen any surprising over-carbonation with the Dupont yeast specifically.  Not all diasaticus strains are equal, and there are other genes that regulate the STA1 behavior.
Right, if you're at FG before bottling then you have nothing to worry about. Yeast can only create as much carbonation as the fermentable extract will allow. You just need to make sure that fermentation is finished before bottling.
I can't say from experience because I avoid diastaticus strains, but I've read about it. Apparently, cross contamination of a non-diastaticus yeast with just a little diastaticus yeast left from a previous batch can cause a problem. Continued enzyme action and fermentation can be very slow and not be noticed when taking gravity samples three days apart. I read everything I can find about it - maybe it will turn out to be a myth?
Every yeast strain has its own nuances, but once you learn them you shouldn't have any big surprises when it comes to performance. I use 3711/Belle Saison quite a lot, and I brew several batches with 3864 every time it gets released. Both are diastaticus strains, and I've never had any bottle bombs or overcarbonated beers from dozens of batches using these two. I know that 3711 takes an extra 5 days or so to eat the last few points of gravity, so I just plan for an extra week in primary. 3864 ferments like any other Belgian strain in my experience, and even though it is a diastaticus strain it hits 80-85% attenuation reliably depending on how much sugar I use. When it's done it's done.

Also, my usual cleaning regimen of PBW and Star San has been sufficient for diastaticus strains. I've had no issues with cross contamination going from Belle followed by a lager in the same fermenter.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline ingy

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Re: LalBrew Farmhouse
« Reply #18 on: January 27, 2022, 06:20:28 pm »
I just kegged a table saison brewed with this yeast. OG was 1.036, FG was 1.004 for 88.6% attenuation. I haven't tasted it yet carbonated, so just giving out some real world numbers. I like that it didn't get super low FG in a low gravity beer.
Jim in Mpls

Offline Megary

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Re: LalBrew Farmhouse
« Reply #19 on: January 28, 2022, 12:24:30 pm »
I just kegged a table saison brewed with this yeast. OG was 1.036, FG was 1.004 for 88.6% attenuation. I haven't tasted it yet carbonated, so just giving out some real world numbers. I like that it didn't get super low FG in a low gravity beer.
Jim in Mpls

Thanks for that.  Please keep us posted.

I finally ordered a pack, so I'll get to see for myself (in a few months)!

Offline kramerog

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Re: LalBrew Farmhouse
« Reply #20 on: January 29, 2022, 08:24:45 am »
I just kegged a table saison brewed with this yeast. OG was 1.036, FG was 1.004 for 88.6% attenuation. I haven't tasted it yet carbonated, so just giving out some real world numbers. I like that it didn't get super low FG in a low gravity beer.
Jim in Mpls
Jim, what temp did you ferment at?

Offline ingy

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Re: LalBrew Farmhouse
« Reply #21 on: February 22, 2022, 09:13:07 pm »
I just kegged a table saison brewed with this yeast. OG was 1.036, FG was 1.004 for 88.6% attenuation. I haven't tasted it yet carbonated, so just giving out some real world numbers. I like that it didn't get super low FG in a low gravity beer.
Jim in Mpls
Jim, what temp did you ferment at?

I fermented on the low end-I pitched at 65, let it free ride up to about 68, then bumped it up to 72 to finish.
I would definately ferment it warmer next time.
Lallemand says "In most cases, lower
fermentation temperatures (close to 20°C) will primarily give notes of
banana and clove, something that is much closer to Belgian blonde and
Belgian wit style ales. When fermented closer to 30°C, we observe that
traditional Saison characteristics are much more predominant. Brewers
reported their beers as having more peppery notes, fruitiness, red apple,
and bubblegum."
Other members of my club brewed with this yeast and the warmer fermented beers were more bubblegummy and saisony. My beer turned out nice after some conditioning. I need to tweak the recipe some for more body.

Offline Robert

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Re: LalBrew Farmhouse
« Reply #22 on: April 14, 2022, 11:38:33 am »
Here is another data point. Just got finished a 7%  saison with this strain. I made a 1500ML starter 24hrs ahead of time with one pack of yeast.  Pitched yeast at 73F with 1.5tsp of fermaid K. Then set temp to 74F @ 24 HR, 75F @ 48HRs, 76F @ 72HRs and held until Final gravity @ 96Hrs.

1Hr mash at 148F

8 LBS Pilsner
1 LB Vienna
8 OZ flaked wheat
8 OZ corn sugar (Boil only)
2 OZ caramunich

OG 1.061
FG 1.008
Attenuation 86%

Offline fredthecat

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Re: LalBrew Farmhouse
« Reply #23 on: April 14, 2022, 02:31:52 pm »
bookmarked for later checking. im hoping its confirmed non-diastaticus

Offline Megary

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Re: LalBrew Farmhouse
« Reply #24 on: June 20, 2022, 07:51:23 am »
I finally got a chance to use Farmhouse yesterday, and I'll update as I go.

90-minute Mash at 152°
One 11g packet into 3 gallons of 1.052 wort.

67% Pilsner
22% Spelt
11% Munich

I decided against any sugar because 1) that's my typical Saison grain bill and 2) I'd like to see what kind of attenuation I get from Farmhouse without inflating the number by adding sugar.

Pitched at 66°, fermentation showed some life in about 4-5 hours, chugging along with conviction at 12hrs.  The fermentation has bumped the temp up to about 68° right now, and I think I'll just let it go until fermentation settles down.  Maybe then I will move the fermenter into a mid-70's area.  Not sure though.  I may just let it finish at ambient cellar temp of 67°.  If my intention is to play around with this yeast, I'll need to set some baseline.

Offline fredthecat

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Re: LalBrew Farmhouse
« Reply #25 on: June 20, 2022, 09:06:37 am »
I finally got a chance to use Farmhouse yesterday, and I'll update as I go.

90-minute Mash at 152°
One 11g packet into 3 gallons of 1.052 wort.

67% Pilsner
22% Spelt
11% Munich

I decided against any sugar because 1) that's my typical Saison grain bill and 2) I'd like to see what kind of attenuation I get from Farmhouse without inflating the number by adding sugar.

Pitched at 66°, fermentation showed some life in about 4-5 hours, chugging along with conviction at 12hrs.  The fermentation has bumped the temp up to about 68° right now, and I think I'll just let it go until fermentation settles down.  Maybe then I will move the fermenter into a mid-70's area.  Not sure though.  I may just let it finish at ambient cellar temp of 67°.  If my intention is to play around with this yeast, I'll need to set some baseline.

spelt flakes, not malt right? i have access to spelt flakes and have been waiting for some reason to use them someday

Offline Megary

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Re: LalBrew Farmhouse
« Reply #26 on: June 20, 2022, 09:44:28 am »
Actually, Spelt Malt, from a craft maltster in PA.

Offline fredthecat

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Re: LalBrew Farmhouse
« Reply #27 on: June 20, 2022, 11:42:12 am »
Actually, Spelt Malt, from a craft maltster in PA.

nice, please let me know how the flavour is when its done

Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: LalBrew Farmhouse
« Reply #28 on: June 21, 2022, 08:24:46 am »
the only reason to use this yeast is if you're worried about diastatic cross contamination-a legitimate worry on the commercial side, but Im not sure how concerned us homerewers need to be
I feel that those who bottle condition should be concerned about diastaticus - possible bottle bombs.

I have saisons brewed with 3711, which is diastaticus, from years ago and never had any bottles blow up. I have beers bottled after plenty of 3711 beers and similarly never had problems. As long as cleaning/sanitation is good then the probability of problems is exceedingly low. Even if you end up with some rogue diastaticus in your beer picked up in your equipment it is still not a substantial risk. The cell count would be so low that it would take a long time for the diastaticus cells to ferment enough to create that much pressure to blow bottles. Some of my bottles are closing in on a decade old and not explosive despite warm storage.

Remember the concern over diastaticus yeast didn't come from rogue saison yeast in a brewery; it was contaminated pitches coming from the yeast lab to the brewery. The diastaticus mixed in the pitch had the opportunity in that situation to grow up from the onset and become a problem. Unless you think you have contaminated starters the probability of an issue is not something IMO we should be overly concerned with.
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Offline Megary

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Re: LalBrew Farmhouse
« Reply #29 on: July 02, 2022, 10:52:05 am »
I finally got a chance to use Farmhouse yesterday, and I'll update as I go.

90-minute Mash at 152°
One 11g packet into 3 gallons of 1.052 wort.

67% Pilsner
22% Spelt
11% Munich

I decided against any sugar because 1) that's my typical Saison grain bill and 2) I'd like to see what kind of attenuation I get from Farmhouse without inflating the number by adding sugar.

Pitched at 66°, fermentation showed some life in about 4-5 hours, chugging along with conviction at 12hrs.  The fermentation has bumped the temp up to about 68° right now, and I think I'll just let it go until fermentation settles down.  Maybe then I will move the fermenter into a mid-70's area.  Not sure though.  I may just let it finish at ambient cellar temp of 67°.  If my intention is to play around with this yeast, I'll need to set some baseline.

Kegged this morning.

So I just let the yeast run it’s course without futzing with temperature changes.  The yeast took the temperature up to 74 at peak activity and then it gradually fell back to about 68, where I let it be.  I use a small Speidel without a lot of head space so I set up a blowoff tube as is normally needed for any Saison I brew.  But this was unwarranted as the activity never got that crazy, fermenting out like a typical beer.  2 weeks in the fermenter.

Went from 1.052 —-> 1.008, almost 85%.

Sample taste was really nice. Definite Saison character, clove/pepper, a bit of lemon (hopped with Nelson Sauvin, so there’s that), spicy bite, no banana, no tropical fruit, dry-ish but not overly so, nothing funny or “off”.

Looking forward to this.