Author Topic: wlp099 taste for a normal gravity beer  (Read 343 times)

Offline fredthecat

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wlp099 taste for a normal gravity beer
« on: April 21, 2022, 07:39:08 pm »
i noticed ron pattinson recommended WLP099 for a historical stout recipe with a 1.063 OG.

people get so caught up with its label "High Gravity Yeast", and forget it can just be used on any beer.

Anyone have any thoughts on its taste? Whitelabs says it "emphasizes malt at lower gravities"

would be nice to have another british yeast for me to consider

Online erockrph

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Re: wlp099 taste for a normal gravity beer
« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2022, 09:08:52 am »
I honestly haven't tried it myself, but the reason Ron recommends a particular yeast is generally because it supposedly comes from the brewery he's writing the recipe for. The recipe in question is probably from Eldridge Pope, was brewed by them, or was from a nearby brewery that is now defunct with no commercial yeast available.

I've wondered the same thing with WLP099 as far as its flavor goes. It's only called High Gravity because it is supposedly the yeast used in Thomas Hardy (or was at one time). It was likely used for beers across a whole spectrum of gravities at some point. If you try it in something like a mild or bitter, please report back with your impressions.
Eric B.

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Offline fredthecat

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Re: wlp099 taste for a normal gravity beer
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2022, 03:06:25 pm »
I honestly haven't tried it myself, but the reason Ron recommends a particular yeast is generally because it supposedly comes from the brewery he's writing the recipe for. The recipe in question is probably from Eldridge Pope, was brewed by them, or was from a nearby brewery that is now defunct with no commercial yeast available.

I've wondered the same thing with WLP099 as far as its flavor goes. It's only called High Gravity because it is supposedly the yeast used in Thomas Hardy (or was at one time). It was likely used for beers across a whole spectrum of gravities at some point. If you try it in something like a mild or bitter, please report back with your impressions.

i 100% have WLP540 (this is your fault :) ) as one of the two next beer yeasts i intend to brew with. unfortunately i just prepped all my spring/early summer beers and i dont know if ill be brewing non-kveik or wine yeasts until fall. there is a chance and i'll post any results here. if somehow i allow for the 2 WLP540s before it gets too hot to brew i'll try a WLP099 one as well.

Offline fredthecat

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Re: wlp099 taste for a normal gravity beer
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2022, 04:48:50 pm »
read these two articles by suregork (not actually sure of his credentials?? but ?? data points)

https://beer.suregork.com/?p=3907

https://beer.suregork.com/?p=3850

wlp099 is like (maybe?) t-58 in that it supposedly it originates from a wine yeast. he also says he believes wlp099 may be/is two strains together. in any case it seems to be unable to assimilate maltotriose. i am on the fence about trying it, since i really like to cut down my brews to ones that most likely to succeed ie. as few experimentation points and as little exp. scale as possible since i don't brew that many per year and hate dumping a bad beer.


not ruling it out, but yeah, my biggest fear is that it doesn't immediately digest maltotriose, but suregork suggests MAYBE one of the strains degrades longchain sugars slowly over time, which is why some people report incredibly low FGs, while others report absurdly high ones with WLP099. it would create an ultimate bottle bomb scenario.