Author Topic: all grain  (Read 437 times)

Offline Ed Meyer

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all grain
« on: February 07, 2022, 02:50:11 pm »
what is highly modified base malt

Online Richard

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Re: all grain
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2022, 03:04:31 pm »
From: https://www.beer-brewing.com/beer_brewing/beer_brewing_barley_malts/malt_modification.htm
In general, modification refers to the extent to which the endosperm breaks down. During the malting process, enzymes break down the cell structure of the endosperm, releasing nutrients necessary for yeast growth and making the starch available for enzyme degradation during mashing. Modification of the endosperm correlates with growth of the acrospire. As the acrospire grows, chemical changes are triggered that result in the production of numerous enzymes, which are organic catalysts. Their function is to break down the complex starches and proteins of the grain.

The modification starts at one end of the kernel and works its way to the other. It can be stopped at any point by the maltster. One indicator is the Kohlbach Index of soluble to total protein ratio. A highly modified malt will have a KI of 45 or higher.

An under-modified malt has long molecules that can only be broken down by doing a complex step mash with several low-temperature rests. A highly-modified malt can be used with a single temperature infusion mash. A small amount of under modified malt can provide proteins to increase foam and head retention to beers that need it.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2022, 03:18:52 pm by Richard »
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Offline lupulus

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Re: all grain
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2022, 04:29:15 pm »
Small correction:
The KI is variety-dependent.
A well-modified malt can have a KI of 38 whereas another variety may need a KI of 50.

Comment:
The most commonly used parameter to measure modification for large malsters is beta glucans.

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Offline lupulus

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Re: all grain
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2022, 09:58:23 am »
Not correct.
Both undermodified and well modified base malts have all needed enzymes provided a correct kilning process.

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Offline narvin

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Re: all grain
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2022, 10:24:50 am »
Quote from: lupulus

Comment:
The most commonly used parameter to measure modification for large malsters is beta glucans.


Does this show up on the malt analysis sheet?

Online Richard

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Re: all grain
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2022, 10:35:54 am »
Modification and diastatic power are not the same. In fact, many under-modified malts are very high in DP. Here is an example data sheet from Mecca Grade under-modified wind malt: https://www.udrop.com/625L/MGEM_Gateway.pdf?download_token=db373952e6c14beb3b9a923d05d9c4e3b73b3197a0a1e4054e0a133585630e4f

S/T = 34-35%
Beta Glucan = 660 mg/l
DP=180-200
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Offline kramerog

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Re: all grain
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2022, 11:07:36 am »
Undermodified malts have not had their proteins sufficiently broken down for getting clear beer with good mouthfeel and head with a single infusion mash. You generally need to do a protein rest and the usual saccharification rest when using undermodified malts.

Offline lupulus

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Re: all grain
« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2022, 11:23:51 am »
Quote from: lupulus

Comment:
The most commonly used parameter to measure modification for large malsters is beta glucans.


Does this show up on the malt analysis sheet?
No.
It has some variability, so they prefer to report friability or viscosity.

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