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Author Topic: First try at Liquid Yeast  (Read 2311 times)

Offline RC

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Re: First try at Liquid Yeast
« Reply #15 on: February 11, 2022, 09:30:42 am »
Maybe I can try this in a pinch if they have it.

https://www.morebeer.com/products/omega-yeast-propper-starter-condensed-wort-placeholder.html

I use Propper all the time. So much easier than DME. I wouldn't use honey or similar sugar source for a starter. Other than sugar, it has no nutrients.

You have plenty of time if you get the starter going now, but if I may, perhaps consider using dry yeast, or multiple liquid pouches, rather than worrying about a starter. Try the starter thing with a future batch, so that you can have fun and enjoy brewing tomorrow without extra worry.

Don't need a stir plate. Look up SNS starter. Timeline is no different with canned starter vs. DME.

Offline EnkAMania

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Re: First try at Liquid Yeast
« Reply #16 on: February 11, 2022, 09:36:30 am »
Before I go to bed, I do the SNS method above.  Shake the heck out of my jar and the next day pitch it.
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Offline denny

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Re: First try at Liquid Yeast
« Reply #17 on: February 11, 2022, 09:45:48 am »
I h ave a water bottle that I have been using for measuring.  That could work.  If I use the canned starter, how long do I have to have it prepared before I put it in the wort?  We are brewing tomorrow, so am I going to be pushed for time?  Also, I don't have the stir plate thingie, can I just shake or stir the jug every so often?  This is all new to me, and we are supposed to brew tomorrow.  LOL.

Please read the link I posted or search here for Shaken Not Stirred starter.  You pitch it 24 hours after you make it.  No stir plate is needed nor recommended. You dont need to shake the jug other than right before you pitch the yeast.
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Offline redrocker652002

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Re: First try at Liquid Yeast
« Reply #18 on: February 11, 2022, 10:12:31 am »
I h ave a water bottle that I have been using for measuring.  That could work.  If I use the canned starter, how long do I have to have it prepared before I put it in the wort?  We are brewing tomorrow, so am I going to be pushed for time?  Also, I don't have the stir plate thingie, can I just shake or stir the jug every so often?  This is all new to me, and we are supposed to brew tomorrow.  LOL.

Please read the link I posted or search here for Shaken Not Stirred starter.  You pitch it 24 hours after you make it.  No stir plate is needed nor recommended. You dont need to shake the jug other than right before you pitch the yeast.

Will do, thanks for the info.

Offline redrocker652002

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Re: First try at Liquid Yeast
« Reply #19 on: February 11, 2022, 10:23:18 am »
Maybe I can try this in a pinch if they have it.

https://www.morebeer.com/products/omega-yeast-propper-starter-condensed-wort-placeholder.html

I use Propper all the time. So much easier than DME. I wouldn't use honey or similar sugar source for a starter. Other than sugar, it has no nutrients.

You have plenty of time if you get the starter going now, but if I may, perhaps consider using dry yeast, or multiple liquid pouches, rather than worrying about a starter. Try the starter thing with a future batch, so that you can have fun and enjoy brewing tomorrow without extra worry.

Don't need a stir plate. Look up SNS starter. Timeline is no different with canned starter vs. DME.

I think you might be right about the dry yeast thing.  But the SNS sounds pretty cool. 

Offline redrocker652002

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Re: First try at Liquid Yeast
« Reply #20 on: February 11, 2022, 10:27:05 am »
I h ave a water bottle that I have been using for measuring.  That could work.  If I use the canned starter, how long do I have to have it prepared before I put it in the wort?  We are brewing tomorrow, so am I going to be pushed for time?  Also, I don't have the stir plate thingie, can I just shake or stir the jug every so often?  This is all new to me, and we are supposed to brew tomorrow.  LOL.

Please read the link I posted or search here for Shaken Not Stirred starter.  You pitch it 24 hours after you make it.  No stir plate is needed nor recommended. You dont need to shake the jug other than right before you pitch the yeast.

Please excuse my ignorance or stupidity, but I want to make sure I understand.  Your article was an incredible read, but also a little over my feeble grey matter.  So I am going to simplify if you would allow me. 

So, I go get a can of wort starter, put it in a plastic container and add the liquid yeast.  Make sure there is an airlock or some way that the gas will escape and leave it on the counter overnight.  When I am ready tomorrow to pitch it, give the container a good shake and pour it into the wort.  Give the wort a bit of a stir as well to distribute the yeast and that is it? 

Again, please excuse my ignorance and stupidity, but this is all very new to me.  RR

Offline fredthecat

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Re: First try at Liquid Yeast
« Reply #21 on: February 11, 2022, 10:38:41 am »
I h ave a water bottle that I have been using for measuring.  That could work.  If I use the canned starter, how long do I have to have it prepared before I put it in the wort?  We are brewing tomorrow, so am I going to be pushed for time?  Also, I don't have the stir plate thingie, can I just shake or stir the jug every so often?  This is all new to me, and we are supposed to brew tomorrow.  LOL.

Please read the link I posted or search here for Shaken Not Stirred starter.  You pitch it 24 hours after you make it.  No stir plate is needed nor recommended. You dont need to shake the jug other than right before you pitch the yeast.

Please excuse my ignorance or stupidity, but I want to make sure I understand.  Your article was an incredible read, but also a little over my feeble grey matter.  So I am going to simplify if you would allow me. 

So, I go get a can of wort starter, put it in a plastic container and add the liquid yeast.  Make sure there is an airlock or some way that the gas will escape and leave it on the counter overnight.  When I am ready tomorrow to pitch it, give the container a good shake and pour it into the wort.  Give the wort a bit of a stir as well to distribute the yeast and that is it? 

Again, please excuse my ignorance and stupidity, but this is all very new to me.  RR


nope, so really quickly to explain the SNS afaik it:

(backstory) homebrewers were using this stir-plate technology to continually mix a starter made up of 1 to 2 litres of water that had an amount of malt extract added to it to provide food for the yeast. the liquid yeast vial/pack is added to this mix and the stir-plate keeps stirring it for a day or few days until its ready.

(SNS method) user saccharomyces here has a strong background in yeast and yeast cultivation and etc. he proposed a system of taking the same sterile wort (i do 1.25 litres water with 100g DME and a pellet or two of hops - 10 min boil makes it about a litre of wort), putting it in a ~ 4 litre jug or carboy (when it's cooled to pitching temp) with a stopper on it and shaking that wort very hard for a minute or so. the additional headspace(emptyspace) in the 4 litre jar allows for a lot of extreme frothiness of the wort.
-then add the liquid yeast to this frothy shaken wort and just leave it for a period of time until you add it to the real, large wort you intend to inoculate.

Offline redrocker652002

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Re: First try at Liquid Yeast
« Reply #22 on: February 11, 2022, 10:48:35 am »
I h ave a water bottle that I have been using for measuring.  That could work.  If I use the canned starter, how long do I have to have it prepared before I put it in the wort?  We are brewing tomorrow, so am I going to be pushed for time?  Also, I don't have the stir plate thingie, can I just shake or stir the jug every so often?  This is all new to me, and we are supposed to brew tomorrow.  LOL.

Please read the link I posted or search here for Shaken Not Stirred starter.  You pitch it 24 hours after you make it.  No stir plate is needed nor recommended. You dont need to shake the jug other than right before you pitch the yeast.

Please excuse my ignorance or stupidity, but I want to make sure I understand.  Your article was an incredible read, but also a little over my feeble grey matter.  So I am going to simplify if you would allow me. 

So, I go get a can of wort starter, put it in a plastic container and add the liquid yeast.  Make sure there is an airlock or some way that the gas will escape and leave it on the counter overnight.  When I am ready tomorrow to pitch it, give the container a good shake and pour it into the wort.  Give the wort a bit of a stir as well to distribute the yeast and that is it? 

Again, please excuse my ignorance and stupidity, but this is all very new to me.  RR


nope, so really quickly to explain the SNS afaik it:

(backstory) homebrewers were using this stir-plate technology to continually mix a starter made up of 1 to 2 litres of water that had an amount of malt extract added to it to provide food for the yeast. the liquid yeast vial/pack is added to this mix and the stir-plate keeps stirring it for a day or few days until its ready.

(SNS method) user saccharomyces here has a strong background in yeast and yeast cultivation and etc. he proposed a system of taking the same sterile wort (i do 1.25 litres water with 100g DME and a pellet or two of hops - 10 min boil makes it about a litre of wort), putting it in a ~ 4 litre jug or carboy (when it's cooled to pitching temp) with a stopper on it and shaking that wort very hard for a minute or so. the additional headspace(emptyspace) in the 4 litre jar allows for a lot of extreme frothiness of the wort.
-then add the liquid yeast to this frothy shaken wort and just leave it for a period of time until you add it to the real, large wort you intend to inoculate.

OK.  I think I have it.  I am going to take a ride to the Morebeer and see what they have.  If nothing else, I need to get dry yeast for this brew and maybe pick up some DME to have on hand to give this a try.  I was thinking of making another batch to bottle anyway, so this might be worth a try.  Thanks all.

Offline denny

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Re: First try at Liquid Yeast
« Reply #23 on: February 11, 2022, 11:02:52 am »
Rather than an airlock, I just put a piece of foil loosely over the opening of the jug
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline redrocker652002

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Re: First try at Liquid Yeast
« Reply #24 on: February 11, 2022, 11:08:55 am »
Rather than an airlock, I just put a piece of foil loosely over the opening of the jug

perfect.   thanks.  off i go.  lol. 

Offline Richard

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Re: First try at Liquid Yeast
« Reply #25 on: February 11, 2022, 03:10:31 pm »
One of the key points is to use a jug that has 4-5 times the volume of you starter so you can get a lot of foam when you shake it. I use one of these because they are lightweight, shatterproof, have a built-in handle and can take temperatures up to boiling: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005P0NPKM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I can shake it like crazy without any chance of dropping it, and no worries even if I do drop it.
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Offline Iliff Ave

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Re: First try at Liquid Yeast
« Reply #26 on: February 11, 2022, 04:02:57 pm »
What's the predicted OG of the beer?
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Offline RC

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Re: First try at Liquid Yeast
« Reply #27 on: February 11, 2022, 07:15:48 pm »
One of the key points is to use a jug that has 4-5 times the volume of you starter so you can get a lot of foam when you shake it. I use one of these because they are lightweight, shatterproof, have a built-in handle and can take temperatures up to boiling: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005P0NPKM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I can shake it like crazy without any chance of dropping it, and no worries even if I do drop it.

I have read over and over that the container has to be at least four times the volume of the starter liquid. "You must have a 1-gallon container in order to make a 1-liter SNS starter!" Not so. IMO, the volume of the container isn't that important.

The important thing is creating froth/foam, for sure. This creates the surface area for oxygen contact/absorption. But too much importance is placed on the container's volume. I do SNS starters without any shaking whatsoever (I have very bad joints). I pasteurize my oxygen wand, stick it in my 2-liter flask containing 1 liter of starter wort and yeast, and gently swirl the flask for 15-30 seconds. Massive froth. SNS achieved.

Offline Richard

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Re: First try at Liquid Yeast
« Reply #28 on: February 11, 2022, 07:40:37 pm »
One of the key points is to use a jug that has 4-5 times the volume of you starter so you can get a lot of foam when you shake it. I use one of these because they are lightweight, shatterproof, have a built-in handle and can take temperatures up to boiling: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005P0NPKM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I can shake it like crazy without any chance of dropping it, and no worries even if I do drop it.

I have read over and over that the container has to be at least four times the volume of the starter liquid. "You must have a 1-gallon container in order to make a 1-liter SNS starter!" Not so. IMO, the volume of the container isn't that important.

The important thing is creating froth/foam, for sure. This creates the surface area for oxygen contact/absorption. But too much importance is placed on the container's volume. I do SNS starters without any shaking whatsoever (I have very bad joints). I pasteurize my oxygen wand, stick it in my 2-liter flask containing 1 liter of starter wort and yeast, and gently swirl the flask for 15-30 seconds. Massive froth. SNS achieved.

Agreed, but then it is more ONS (oxygenated not stirred) than SNS. One thing I like about the SNS method is that I don't need to use my oxygen tank and wand.
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Offline RC

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Re: First try at Liquid Yeast
« Reply #29 on: February 11, 2022, 08:39:41 pm »
One of the key points is to use a jug that has 4-5 times the volume of you starter so you can get a lot of foam when you shake it. I use one of these because they are lightweight, shatterproof, have a built-in handle and can take temperatures up to boiling: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005P0NPKM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I can shake it like crazy without any chance of dropping it, and no worries even if I do drop it.

I have read over and over that the container has to be at least four times the volume of the starter liquid. "You must have a 1-gallon container in order to make a 1-liter SNS starter!" Not so. IMO, the volume of the container isn't that important.

The important thing is creating froth/foam, for sure. This creates the surface area for oxygen contact/absorption. But too much importance is placed on the container's volume. I do SNS starters without any shaking whatsoever (I have very bad joints). I pasteurize my oxygen wand, stick it in my 2-liter flask containing 1 liter of starter wort and yeast, and gently swirl the flask for 15-30 seconds. Massive froth. SNS achieved.

Agreed, but then it is more ONS (oxygenated not stirred) than SNS. One thing I like about the SNS method is that I don't need to use my oxygen tank and wand.

ONS = SNS. The point of the shaking is to infuse oxygen into the wort and create bubbles/foam, i.e. surface area. More than one way to achieve this, is all I’m saying.