Author Topic: The biggest technological advance in brewing in the last 75 years is...  (Read 1145 times)

Offline HighVoltageMan!

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I am NOT putting this information here to stir any pot but to ensure this information is available to all homebrewers.

Can I please ask a favor of all?

If low oxygen is not your thing, let it be.

Thanks in advance!

Sent from my SM-G981U1 using Tapatalk

BTW, thanks for posting the article. It may not be for everyone, but it's interesting none the less.

Offline jeffy

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I am NOT putting this information here to stir any pot but to ensure this information is available to all homebrewers.

Can I please ask a favor of all?

If low oxygen is not your thing, let it be.

Thanks in advance!

Sent from my SM-G981U1 using Tapatalk

BTW, thanks for posting the article. It may not be for everyone, but it's interesting none the less.
Yes, thanks for posting this.
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
Homebrewing since 1990
AHA member since 1991, now a lifetime member
BJCP judge since 1995

Offline Village Taphouse

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I feel like most of us are on the same page.  I looked into reducing O2 during the process and I still do many of those things.  I do believe my beer improved because of it.  But I am really freaking tired of this topic and the friction that it causes on the various boards.  I usually state it this way:  I love drinking my beer.  Many times I would prefer to drink my own beer over many commercially-available beers.  When someone is at my place and taps themselves a beer they seem to be generally impressed and drink the beer(s) with enthusiasm and mention a number of times how good the beer is.  No, they're not BJCP judges.  They're beer drinkers.  That's what matters to me.  When I encounter a problem with all of that, I'll lift the hood and address it.  By now I feel like most veteran homebrewers have heard about LO brewing and they have had the chance to check it out or not check it out.  The concept that it has to be brought back up over and over again is exasperating.  If you like it, good.  If you see someone who is not following it, just move on. 
Ken from Chicago. 
A day without beer is like... just kidding, I have no idea.

Offline fredthecat

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Truly, I just don't understand the point you are trying to make, and maybe you could explain it further. So commercial beer's greatest advancement was removing O2 on the hot side. Is this practice industry-wide now? Do most or all craft breweries do this?

I think big name bavarian beers (presumably most likely to have had direct or indirect involvement from narziss) can range from meh to great (but rarely mind-blowing). So what commercial examples would you recommend to really showcase this hot-side low O2 feature?










Offline Village Taphouse

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It was mentioned a number of times too that homebrewers are not necessarily looking for "long shelf life".  Yes we want our beer to be delicious and fresh-tasting when we tap a glass of it.  My beer is kept cold, carbed and kegged in an on-deck fridge and then it comes to the taps.  It has not gone through any travel, it has not been mishandled, gone from warm to cold, back to warm again, etc.  It used to be very rare that I would taste anything even remotely close to oxidation in my beers and that was if I tapped beer into a growler or bottles and then let it sit for a long period... and I pretty much never do that.  I have a lager on tap right now that was brewed in the fall of 2021 (long story) and it's delicious and not oxidized as far as I can tell.
Ken from Chicago. 
A day without beer is like... just kidding, I have no idea.

Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Before this goes further south, I told you so.

That is exactly what my wife always tells me.....
Winning Gold Medals isn't everything, but it sure is fun!

Offline HighVoltageMan!

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Truly, I just don't understand the point you are trying to make, and maybe you could explain it further. So commercial beer's greatest advancement was removing O2 on the hot side. Is this practice industry-wide now? Do most or all craft breweries do this?

I think big name bavarian beers (presumably most likely to have had direct or indirect involvement from narziss) can range from meh to great (but rarely mind-blowing). So what commercial examples would you recommend to really showcase this hot-side low O2 feature?

I believe this was a question posed to Dr. Ludwig Narziss and that was his answer. From his perspective, it could very well be true. Pretty simple.

Offline hmbrw4life

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A cpl thoughts:

Banning:  Lupulus and Bilsch, two of the authors of the original doc that introduced the techniques, haven’t been banned.


Unless Lupulus goes by another pseudonym, he was not part of the original group. This is correct, right Lupulus?



Therefore, it must be something other than the information that causes banning.

Its not the strawmans listed above either. So I guess we also ponder the same thing.


This group is an interesting study from the outside in.
Science functions when theory correctly predicts the results of experiments.
Six Sigma in a former life. Retired in the current life.

Offline denny

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OK, that's enough of this crap.  Sorry.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell