Author Topic: “New” dry lager yeast from Morebeer  (Read 1781 times)

Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Re: “New” dry lager yeast from Morebeer
« Reply #15 on: May 12, 2022, 12:30:34 pm »
That was me that postulated it might be Diamond repackaged. I don’t know anything. I believe Cellar Science repackages all their yeasts and noticed there was a question/answer on the Baja product web page about Diamond pitch rates. Why discuss Diamond pitch rates on the Baja page?
Your points are valid.  There is some confusion.  I'll post the reply I get from MoreBeer (if I get one...) here so we're all on the same page.  I hope the guys at Cellar Science aren't rebranding some other strain as "Mexican" thinking that homebrewers will snatch it up because it's the first and only dry Mexican lager yeast available.  I will be quite disappointed and discouraged if that's what they're doing here.

What is it that makes a Mexican lager yeast different than say a German one?

Or different from a Bavarian one? An American one?

That is the million dollar question.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2022, 12:32:16 pm by Bel Air Brewing »
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Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: “New” dry lager yeast from Morebeer
« Reply #16 on: May 12, 2022, 12:34:36 pm »
What is it that makes a Mexican lager yeast different than say a German one?
I can't say for sure but do you brew with different lager yeasts and notice a difference in their character?  There is something about 940 that is very distinct to my tastebuds.  I can say the same about 2124.  I can't put my finger on it but I know it's there.  Also, 2308/838 has a very distinct character that I can pick out in a commercial beer.  I can't describe it with words.  Also, I'll go back to what I said:  AFAIK there is no dry yeast out there marketed as a Mexican lager yeast but this one is marketed that way.  So if you're suggesting that this could be a German yeast then why not say so?  Because they want to get people interested in the first and only dry Mexican yeast on the market?  That would be underhanded, IMO.  Your question could be stated as what makes a Czech lager yeast different from an American strain or any other combination.  We brew with what is appropriate for the style (at least I typically do) so words matter.  Sure I have made a helles with 940 and it came out great but I knew there were probably more suitable yeast strains out there for a helles including Bayern, 2124, 2308 and a number of others. 
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Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Re: “New” dry lager yeast from Morebeer
« Reply #17 on: May 12, 2022, 01:31:22 pm »
When it gets right down to it, how much real, that is, able-to-taste-the-difference, exists between lager yeasts?

Not talking about dry vs wet, but dry vs dry, and wet vs wet.

I am willing to bet there is little difference that the average beer drinker can reliably detect.
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Offline denny

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Re: “New” dry lager yeast from Morebeer
« Reply #18 on: May 12, 2022, 01:37:42 pm »
What is it that makes a Mexican lager yeast different than say a German one?
I can't say for sure but do you brew with different lager yeasts and notice a difference in their character?  There is something about 940 that is very distinct to my tastebuds.  I can say the same about 2124.  I can't put my finger on it but I know it's there.  Also, 2308/838 has a very distinct character that I can pick out in a commercial beer.  I can't describe it with words.  Also, I'll go back to what I said:  AFAIK there is no dry yeast out there marketed as a Mexican lager yeast but this one is marketed that way.  So if you're suggesting that this could be a German yeast then why not say so?  Because they want to get people interested in the first and only dry Mexican yeast on the market?  That would be underhanded, IMO.  Your question could be stated as what makes a Czech lager yeast different from an American strain or any other combination.  We brew with what is appropriate for the style (at least I typically do) so words matter.  Sure I have made a helles with 940 and it came out great but I knew there were probably more suitable yeast strains out there for a helles including Bayern, 2124, 2308 and a number of others.

Yes, I notice differences, but a lot less than in ale yeast.  Very minor differences.  But why is "Mexican lager yeast" a big deal?  We habv no idea of this is 940 originally, and even if it was, if it produces beer anything like 940 does.  I worry less about the name and more about the beer it produces.  And yeah, what makes a Czech lager yeast different than an American one?  Shouldn't they be chosen based on results, not name?
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Offline denny

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Re: “New” dry lager yeast from Morebeer
« Reply #19 on: May 12, 2022, 01:38:16 pm »
When it gets right down to it, how much real, that is, able-to-taste-the-difference, exists between lager yeasts?

Not talking about dry vs wet, but dry vs dry, and wet vs wet.

I am willing to bet there is little difference that the average beer drinker can reliably detect.

I agree
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Offline narvin

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Re: “New” dry lager yeast from Morebeer
« Reply #20 on: May 12, 2022, 01:59:32 pm »
What is it that makes a Mexican lager yeast different than say a German one?
I can't say for sure but do you brew with different lager yeasts and notice a difference in their character?  There is something about 940 that is very distinct to my tastebuds.  I can say the same about 2124.  I can't put my finger on it but I know it's there.  Also, 2308/838 has a very distinct character that I can pick out in a commercial beer.  I can't describe it with words.  Also, I'll go back to what I said:  AFAIK there is no dry yeast out there marketed as a Mexican lager yeast but this one is marketed that way.  So if you're suggesting that this could be a German yeast then why not say so?  Because they want to get people interested in the first and only dry Mexican yeast on the market?  That would be underhanded, IMO.  Your question could be stated as what makes a Czech lager yeast different from an American strain or any other combination.  We brew with what is appropriate for the style (at least I typically do) so words matter.  Sure I have made a helles with 940 and it came out great but I knew there were probably more suitable yeast strains out there for a helles including Bayern, 2124, 2308 and a number of others.

Just to throw more fuel on the fire, the liquid yeast companies may not even be entirely correct with their labelling.  838 is thought to be an ale yeast after gene sequencing, and not the same as 2308. Other lager yeasts may have strayed as they passed through various breweries, but White Labs and Wyeast likely sampled them at different points, possibly after being stored by intermediaries.

Here's what Suregork says about 940:





Online jeffy

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Re: “New” dry lager yeast from Morebeer
« Reply #21 on: May 12, 2022, 02:05:41 pm »
I think it's all about trends.  A year ago, you'd be hard pressed to find the defining characteristics of a Mexican Lager.
Next you'll probably see Italian Pilsner yeast.
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Offline BrewBama

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“New” dry lager yeast from Morebeer
« Reply #22 on: May 12, 2022, 02:16:37 pm »

What is it that makes a Mexican lager yeast different than say a German one?
The language the label is written in and the Atlantic Ocean.

Seriously. Mex Lager yeast and German Lager were the same. When Germans immigrated to Mexico they brought their yeast and brewing know how with them. After a cpl hundred years they drifted into distinct strains. Taste contribution, fermenting characteristics, and ‘Ooomph’ can be detected by some. *

820 is pretty close to the original ‘Mother’ strain.



* pur speculation on my part
« Last Edit: May 12, 2022, 07:32:56 pm by BrewBama »

Offline denny

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Re: “New” dry lager yeast from Morebeer
« Reply #23 on: May 12, 2022, 02:21:31 pm »
I think it's all about trends.  A year ago, you'd be hard pressed to find the defining characteristics of a Mexican Lager.
Next you'll probably see Italian Pilsner yeast.

THIS!
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Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: “New” dry lager yeast from Morebeer
« Reply #24 on: May 12, 2022, 02:50:21 pm »
Here is their response:

Quote
Thank you for your inquiry. This yeast strain is also known as Fermolager Crisp. Cellar Science is a brand of repackaged dried yeast and the strains are typically sourced from European labs and companies. We are currently working on bringing on this strain in the smaller size. We do not have an ETA right now, but hope it will be available soon in the 12g size.

Has anyone heard of Fermolager Crisp?

It's produced by something called AEB Group and here is their description:

Quote
Dry active bottom fermenting yeast strain carefully selected for fermentation of lagers with distinctive crisp finish.

Versatile bottom fermenting yeast for production of crisp lagers with remarkable clean character. Originally from Mexico City, this excellent strain allows a harmonious expression of malt & hops notes, while confering a well-balanced palate with drinkability & dry finish. It efficiently attenuate at low end of lager temperature range. An excellent yeast strain for fermentation of supreme lagers.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2022, 02:53:02 pm by Village Taphouse »
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Offline BrewBama

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“New” dry lager yeast from Morebeer
« Reply #25 on: May 12, 2022, 02:55:37 pm »
They’re the same Italian group that produces Antioxin SBT ‘trifecta’ (kmeta + AA + gallo tannin) used by Low O2 brewers.

Sounds like a great yeast. They say it’s Mexican. Cold ferment: 50-57°F.



« Last Edit: May 12, 2022, 03:27:19 pm by BrewBama »

Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: “New” dry lager yeast from Morebeer
« Reply #26 on: May 12, 2022, 03:26:55 pm »
They’re the same Italian group that produces Antioxin SBT ‘trifecta’ (kmeta, AA, gallo tannin) used by Low O2 brewers.

Sounds like a great yeast. They say it’s Mexican. 50-57°F.




Yeah, I would be happy to try it but I have never bought a $100 brick of dry yeast before so that part is unusual.  Maybe this AEB Group sells it in smaller packages. 
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Offline BrewBama

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Re: “New” dry lager yeast from Morebeer
« Reply #27 on: May 12, 2022, 04:38:27 pm »
Unfortunately, it says 500g packs. I imagine MoreBeer will have them repackage it into 11-12g packs or repackage it themselves.

Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: “New” dry lager yeast from Morebeer
« Reply #28 on: May 12, 2022, 04:51:11 pm »
Unfortunately, it says 500g packs. I imagine MoreBeer will have them repackage it into 11-12g packs or repackage it themselves.
I could see this:  Buy the pack.  I know I have never used the yeast before but let's roll the dice.  Measure out 11-12g and use it.  The roll up the original packaging and place it INSIDE of a vac-seal bag and seal it.  With that much yeast you could use fresh dry yeast every batch although I don't know that I would.  I like the sound of it overall and glad that they gave us the origin of it.  Seems like it would make a nice lager. 
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Online tommymorris

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“New” dry lager yeast from Morebeer
« Reply #29 on: May 12, 2022, 05:28:30 pm »
Can’t wait to try it.

Edit: I will wait for 12g packs.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2022, 05:48:41 pm by tommymorris »