Author Topic: The biggest technological advance in brewing in the last 75 years is...  (Read 1030 times)

Offline lupulus

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Look at the article...

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Offline Megary

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As it applies to homebrewing, the answer is the internet.  Without it, about 5 people would know about keeping air out or the other thousand important things there is to know about making a decent beer.  Just my opinion. 

Offline denny

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I don't think there's any debate about that. It's simply a question of how far a homebrewing hobbyist wants to go to deal with it.
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Offline fredthecat

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As it applies to homebrewing, the answer is the internet.  Without it, about 5 people would know about keeping air out or the other thousand important things there is to know about making a decent beer.  Just my opinion.

1000% this. even more than just the internet is the way the internet has become ubiquitous and super accessible for non-tech savvy people. its about crowdsharing/sourcing info, and with more and more people online (probably reached the kind of saturation i mean in the late 2000s, where forums like HBT had dozens if not hundreds of posts each day) and easy ability to post video files and detailed, HQ pics or even just link people to online purchases directly.

lol about the low O2 thing, i don't think there are many people here who disagree that in an absolutely perfect brewing system there would be flushing of oxygen from tubing, methods to reduce o2 on the hotside, etc.

it's just two things:

1. i and many others homebrew absolutely delicious beers that are really exciting to drink and hold up really well to some great quality craft commercial beers. so narziss worked at weihenstephan and i presume worked with other bavarian breweries? yeah i like their stuff, its not my favourite, but its good. so how can we prove that his o2 purging makes some mystical super beer? which beer do i buy to taste this supreme oxygen-free malt taste?

2. the o2 reduction steps would be another big pile of work to do and costs incurred and frankly i just don't care enough to do it. a lot of people do really embrace a simple homebrewing style.


Offline lupulus

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As it applies to homebrewing, the answer is the internet.  Without it, about 5 people would know about keeping air out or the other thousand important things there is to know about making a decent beer.  Just my opinion.

We now have two opinions, Narziss and yours.

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Offline BrewBama

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I don't think there's any debate about that. It's simply a question of how far a homebrewing hobbyist wants to go to deal with it.
We do what we can and live with what we can’t.

Offline fredthecat

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what is a good commercial example of this super beer? i'd like to try it. is it weihenstephaner? because i've had their beers many times

Offline Bel Air Brewing

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The internet, certainly. It has brought an encyclopedia of hundreds of years of brewing history into our offices, and our living rooms, and our garage-breweries.

It has also brought to light many of the traditional practices that have now been shown to be not required.

Was it not Charlie Bamforth who stated that for home brewers, of the top 10 problems we face, oxygen is number 23?
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Offline dmtaylor

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Hmm.  I was going to say:

Dried yeasts that don't suck.
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Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Hmm.  I was going to say:

Dried yeasts that don't suck.

Absolutely! And how about this forum? This is where Diamond Lager Yeast was brought to my attention. Otherwise, I would never have known about it.
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Offline narvin

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1946- is a rather arbitrary time period.  I guess you don't want to ask a German what their favorite scientific advances were regarding purity during the preceding decade.

If we were talking 20th century, I'd go with pure yeast. Before that, refrigeration.  Good malting is really important.  Oxygen is very important but I still think that separating it between hot side and cold side is a distinction that can't be understated, especially for homebrewers who aren't as worried about shelf life. But then again, my opinion doesn't carry the gravitas of Professor Narziss.  Good topic for discussion though.

Offline lupulus

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what is a good commercial example of this super beer? i'd like to try it. is it weihenstephaner? because i've had their beers many times
No need to go that far. You can go with most current offerings of Sierra Nevada.

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Offline Megary

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As it applies to homebrewing, the answer is the internet.  Without it, about 5 people would know about keeping air out or the other thousand important things there is to know about making a decent beer.  Just my opinion.

We now have two opinions, Narziss and yours.

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???
 Honestly not sure what your point is here.  Are we keeping score??

Offline lupulus

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The internet, certainly. It has brought an encyclopedia of hundreds of years of brewing history into our offices, and our living rooms, and our garage-breweries.

It has also brought to light many of the traditional practices that have now been shown to be not required.

Was it not Charlie Bamforth who stated that for home brewers, of the top 10 problems we face, oxygen is number 23?

It would be out of character.
When asked, Bamforth always states that he has never homebrewed.
If you find this top 10 list, please share.


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Offline hmbrw4life

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I don't think there's any debate about that. It's simply a question of how far a homebrewing hobbyist wants to go to deal with it.

REALLY?! When did this transition from you happen?

Why are the folks who brought this forward still banned?
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