Author Topic: Two questions: floor/walls & septic systems  (Read 676 times)

Offline Cliffs

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Re: Two questions: floor/walls & septic systems
« Reply #15 on: May 25, 2022, 08:54:09 am »
One of my first jobs outr of high school was septic repair. The quality of septic systems varies dramatically. some could handle a ton, some can handle almost nothing.

Offline MNWayne

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Re: Two questions: floor/walls & septic systems
« Reply #16 on: May 25, 2022, 09:29:57 am »
Sealed concrete floor shouldn't be an issue, not that much liquid should be hitting the floor.  I've heard that excessive liquid is bad for septics, so if you're using a lot of water, try to reclaim cooling water for irrigation.  IMHO the most concerning issue is water vapor, be sure you have adequate venting to help prevent condensation and mold.
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Offline Visor

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Re: Two questions: floor/walls & septic systems
« Reply #17 on: May 25, 2022, 09:53:51 am »
   Unless it was improperly hung, the drywall should not be in contact with the floor at any point. SOP is to hang the board ~1/4" to 1/2" off the floor to prevent it from being damaged by minor flooding, I.E., a toilet backing up or excessively sloppy mopping.
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Offline dbeechum

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Re: Two questions: floor/walls & septic systems
« Reply #18 on: May 25, 2022, 10:06:07 am »
   Unless it was improperly hung, the drywall should not be in contact with the floor at any point. SOP is to hang the board ~1/4" to 1/2" off the floor to prevent it from being damaged by minor flooding, I.E., a toilet backing up or excessively sloppy mopping.

Making a bold assumption about the amount of properly hung drywall out there! :)

I'm discovering fun new things about my garage from 1925, like yes - the drywall is all the way to the floor. The walls are framed out with absolutely gorgeous douglas fir and redwood that you'd never find anymore. (seems a crime to cover it, but services and insulation... sigh). And surprise, they used old fence pickets attached to the narrow edging of the frame boards as erstwhile furring strips and drywall mounts.

Also whoever designed the plumbing was quite probably drunk or insane... or both. good lord.
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Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Two questions: floor/walls & septic systems
« Reply #19 on: May 25, 2022, 10:28:38 am »
In wet areas, it is advised to use treated lumber as framing, using double 2X4 plates and holding the drywall off the floor by about an inch, then attaching trim base boards  or plastic base as sacrificial pieces in the event of a backup.  Worth consideration, though the OP's basement is already finished.
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Offline scrap iron

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Re: Two questions: floor/walls & septic systems
« Reply #20 on: May 25, 2022, 10:37:17 am »
I would not dump any old yeast into the tank especially if the system is not vented. Ask me how I know. Get some Rid-X and treat it monthly.
Reuse cooling water in the garden or for the grass and dump old yeast in a compost or can be used in the garden.

I've been doing for 25 years without a problem.
If you have a vented septic system you are probably ok. But if you have too much yeast it does not break down grease, plant material or protein only starches and sugars. It also competes with the bacteria that does break down those things.
My advise, Rid-X or other bacteria to build it back up.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2022, 10:45:53 am by scrap iron »
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Offline scrap iron

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Re: Two questions: floor/walls & septic systems
« Reply #21 on: May 25, 2022, 10:48:57 am »
I would not dump any old yeast into the tank especially if the system is not vented. Ask me how I know. Get some Rid-X and treat it monthly.
Reuse cooling water in the garden or for the grass and dump old yeast in a compost or can be used in the garden.
I am curious what happened when you put yeast down the drain.
I have an old house that has been added onto several times. Have a 1/2 bath added later on that has no vent. One time I got up in the middle of the night to pee like old men do. I went to the 1/2 bath and didn't turn on the light as not to wake the Mrs. I had to sit with no light on and that's when I felt water on the seat. The yeast produced enough co2 to vent through toilet, gross. :o That's my, don't do that story.
At least you got a good story out of it!
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Offline denny

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Re: Two questions: floor/walls & septic systems
« Reply #22 on: May 25, 2022, 10:49:41 am »
I would not dump any old yeast into the tank especially if the system is not vented. Ask me how I know. Get some Rid-X and treat it monthly.
Reuse cooling water in the garden or for the grass and dump old yeast in a compost or can be used in the garden.

I've been doing for 25 years without a problem.
If you have a vented septic system you are probably ok. But if you have too much yeast it does not break down grease, plant material or protein only starches and sugars. It also competes with the bacteria that does break down those things.
My advise, Rid-X or other bacteria to build it back up.

I don't even know what a vented septic system is. This one is probably 50-60 years old.  When I look at the v plume of the septic system as compared to the volume of yeast and sanitizer I put in it, I'm not worried.
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Offline scrap iron

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Re: Two questions: floor/walls & septic systems
« Reply #23 on: May 25, 2022, 12:21:18 pm »
Your system is most likely vented, has a pipe that comes up through the roof and down to the pipes that exit to the tank. If you see a pipe coming out the roof above your bathroom that's it. My house is older than yours and the main bathroom is vented but the add on bath on the back off the house is not.
The vent allows equal drain pressure of water and air and gases to vent out the roof.
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Offline neuse

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Re: Two questions: floor/walls & septic systems
« Reply #24 on: May 25, 2022, 02:01:49 pm »
Your system is most likely vented, has a pipe that comes up through the roof and down to the pipes that exit to the tank. If you see a pipe coming out the roof above your bathroom that's it. My house is older than yours and the main bathroom is vented but the add on bath on the back off the house is not.
The vent allows equal drain pressure of water and air and gases to vent out the roof.
Maybe that’s the key to this question. As far as I know, code has required all houses for many years to have vents. I’m thinking that puts most of us in the clear. Is that the consensus?

Offline narvin

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Re: Two questions: floor/walls & septic systems
« Reply #25 on: May 25, 2022, 05:06:25 pm »
All plumbing needs a vent stack, not just septic.  You can have serious problems with sewer gas with or without adding yeast!

Offline chinaski

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Re: Two questions: floor/walls & septic systems
« Reply #26 on: May 26, 2022, 07:08:43 am »
You can also get a flexible plastic baseboard trim that prevents liquid from getting to the drywall from the floor.

Redoing the drywall in my garage right now and adding just that to keep the dry wall from getting all squidgy
I know that they now make specific cement board for wet areas like showers.  We learned this when having having two different contractors work on our bathroom remodel and construction several years ago- one knew the latest products and how to use them, the other did not.

As for steam management, I really like the Bru'n Dog condenser that I built for my kettle lid.  A hugely simpler and cost-saving solution over installing a ventilation system.
« Last Edit: May 26, 2022, 07:29:39 am by chinaski »