Author Topic: Malted corn  (Read 693 times)

Offline MDL

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Re: Malted corn
« Reply #15 on: July 09, 2022, 08:54:44 am »
All very interesting! Maybe I should stick to the corn grits and cereal mash.

Offline denny

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Re: Malted corn
« Reply #16 on: July 09, 2022, 09:55:33 am »
All very interesting! Maybe I should stick to the corn grits and cereal mash.

It depends on what you want. If you want more of a trad corn flavor, the grits are the way to go.
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Malted corn
« Reply #17 on: July 09, 2022, 10:12:04 am »
All very interesting! Maybe I should stick to the corn grits and cereal mash.

It depends on what you want. If you want more of a trad corn flavor, the grits are the way to go.

My opion is that it is a fresher flavor. Flakers are heated by the rollers, then they set at the LHBS, then they get mashed, so heated twice.
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Offline erockrph

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Re: Malted corn
« Reply #18 on: July 09, 2022, 10:38:34 am »
Denny and Drew mentioned using it in a Cream Ale, I believe.  Denny can chime in - I don't recall any cereal mashing, I think it is mashed like any barley malt....

Yeah, it's malted, right?  So no cereal mashing necessary.  Drew used it to make a cream ale and it was...interesting.  I don't know if I'd recognize it as a cream ale. Very unique flavor, unlike any corn beer I've ever tasted. My takeaway was don't think you can just sub it for corn, because it's so different.

I would definitely imagine the malting would change its character. Seems like it would make an interesting candidate for whiskey distillation. That said, usually when there is an uncommon brewing ingredient like this there is a reason why it hasn't become popular. IOW it has been tried before.
I wonder if this is why there have been reports of malted Bloody Butcher tasting different than flaked corn, rather than primarily being due to the varietal. I have a few pounds of malted BB that I'll be using soon, so I'll be interested to see what the flavor difference turns out to be.

That's exactly my thinking.  Malted produces a malted flavor, right?  Think of barley malt as opposed to flaked barley.  Very different, just like BB is very different than flaked corn.  That's why I think it isn't a replacement for flaked corn, but needs its own recipes.  The cream ale Drew made with it tasted nothing like a cream ale.

And of course Bloody Butcher may not taste the same as another maltster Corn Malt, and Corn Malt shouldn’t be assumed to be a 1:1 replacement for flaked corn, nor can we assume it plays the same with other malts and adjuncts and hops…

Probably a good start would be 10% to see what it brings, then adjust the dial as needed.  There certainly can be a place in the homebrewer’s brewhouse for the clean sweetness of malted corn if one is willing to tackle the learning curve.
I usually use 20-30% when I use flaked corn in lagers. I'll probably use the same amount when I first try out BB and see what happens.
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Offline Megary

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Re: Malted corn
« Reply #19 on: July 09, 2022, 11:11:45 am »
Denny and Drew mentioned using it in a Cream Ale, I believe.  Denny can chime in - I don't recall any cereal mashing, I think it is mashed like any barley malt....

Yeah, it's malted, right?  So no cereal mashing necessary.  Drew used it to make a cream ale and it was...interesting.  I don't know if I'd recognize it as a cream ale. Very unique flavor, unlike any corn beer I've ever tasted. My takeaway was don't think you can just sub it for corn, because it's so different.

I would definitely imagine the malting would change its character. Seems like it would make an interesting candidate for whiskey distillation. That said, usually when there is an uncommon brewing ingredient like this there is a reason why it hasn't become popular. IOW it has been tried before.
I wonder if this is why there have been reports of malted Bloody Butcher tasting different than flaked corn, rather than primarily being due to the varietal. I have a few pounds of malted BB that I'll be using soon, so I'll be interested to see what the flavor difference turns out to be.

That's exactly my thinking.  Malted produces a malted flavor, right?  Think of barley malt as opposed to flaked barley.  Very different, just like BB is very different than flaked corn.  That's why I think it isn't a replacement for flaked corn, but needs its own recipes.  The cream ale Drew made with it tasted nothing like a cream ale.

And of course Bloody Butcher may not taste the same as another maltster Corn Malt, and Corn Malt shouldn’t be assumed to be a 1:1 replacement for flaked corn, nor can we assume it plays the same with other malts and adjuncts and hops…

Probably a good start would be 10% to see what it brings, then adjust the dial as needed.  There certainly can be a place in the homebrewer’s brewhouse for the clean sweetness of malted corn if one is willing to tackle the learning curve.
I usually use 20-30% when I use flaked corn in lagers. I'll probably use the same amount when I first try out BB and see what happens.

I love the idea of Corn Malt in an American Lager.  I would definitely be interested to hear how you get on with it, whenever you try it out.

Just one data point.  The craft maltster that I buy most of my grains from puts a recommended brewing usage on their Corn Malt at <20% (<51% for distilling).

Offline purduekenn

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Re: Malted corn
« Reply #20 on: July 14, 2022, 01:09:18 pm »
I've brewed 3 batches of beer with Sugar Creek Malted corn this year:
1) 3.5 gallons:73% 2Row Malt and 17% Sugar Creek Bloody Butcher red malted corn.
2) 5.3 gallons: 75% 2Row Malt and 25% Sugar Creek Amanda white malted corn.
3) 5.3 gallons: 75% 2Row Malt and 25% Sugar Creek Bloody Butcher red malted corn.
All of these beers used Magnum hops for bittering and Willamette at 10 minutes and at flameout. For about 20 IBU's from Beer Smith software.
All of these beers used Lallemand BRY-97 dry yeast.

in my experience they don't taste like a traditional Cream Ale like Little Kings or Spotted Cow. In my opinion you don't get the sweetness like a traditional cream ale. That doesn't make the better or worse just different. It was interesting that everyone that tasted the beers like the #3 beer with 25% red corn and said they could drink it all day long. I liked it but I got a what I thought was a little astringent flavor on the finish. It was not awful by any means. I didn't note it on the 1st brew with 8% less red corn in the recipe. I think my favorite was the white corn I would say I cold drink several pints of it. I need to drink them side by side for comparison. I also liked #1 and could drink several pints of it.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2022, 01:12:13 pm by purduekenn »