Author Topic: Irish Red Ale  (Read 1839 times)

Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: Irish Red Ale
« Reply #15 on: July 06, 2022, 05:20:53 pm »
For color reference, this is a 100% RedX ale

That's nice.  Beautiful color.  Is/was that beer super malty?  I seem to remember Red-X having a very deep character. 
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Offline Semper Sitientem

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Re: Irish Red Ale
« Reply #16 on: July 06, 2022, 05:54:03 pm »
Yes, it’s malty, but I don’t think it’s over the top. Of course, I like malty beers. It also has a nice dry finish. I’ve gotten a lot of compliments on this beer and it figures it’s the one I put the least thought and effort into.
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Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Re: Irish Red Ale
« Reply #17 on: July 06, 2022, 06:18:37 pm »
Yes, it’s malty, but I don’t think it’s over the top. Of course, I like malty beers. It also has a nice dry finish. I’ve gotten a lot of compliments on this beer and it figures it’s the one I put the least thought and effort into.

Malty might have a place in an Irish Red.

Flavor

Moderate to very little caramel malt flavor and sweetness, rarely with a light buttered toast or toffee-like quality. The palate often is fairly neutral and grainy, or can take on a lightly toasty or biscuity note as it finishes with a light taste of roasted grain, which lends a characteristic dryness to the finish. A light earthy or floral hop flavor is optional. Medium to medium-low bitterness. Medium-dry to dry finish. Clean and smooth. Low esters optional. The balance tends to be slightly towards the malt, although light use of roasted grains may increase the perception of bitterness slightly.
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Offline Iliff Ave

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Re: Irish Red Ale
« Reply #18 on: July 06, 2022, 06:43:24 pm »
Red x is too malty for me at 100%. I like to split it with Pilsner malt and build back the the color with carafa. Of course that’s not for an Irish red however I could see that work with MO or GP
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Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: Irish Red Ale
« Reply #19 on: July 06, 2022, 06:47:35 pm »
Red x is too malty for me at 100%. I like to split it with Pilsner malt and build back the the color with carafa. Of course that’s not for an Irish red however I could see that work with MO or GP
This is where I was too.  I used it at a high percentage in a few beers and the maltiness was formidable.  If I hopped the bejesus out of it and maybe built the water for more sulfate and maybe mashed at a lower temp or something then maybe.  It's just really, really deep. 
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Offline chumley

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Offline fredthecat

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Re: Irish Red Ale
« Reply #21 on: July 07, 2022, 08:23:41 am »
Red x is too malty for me at 100%. I like to split it with Pilsner malt and build back the the color with carafa. Of course that’s not for an Irish red however I could see that work with MO or GP

then entering the world of "no true irish red ale would use a german malt" lol

it's the funniest style classification ever tbh - "it has to be RED, it has to be um irish" yet it did not exist in ireland and i can't remember ever hearing about one using say malting co. of ireland ingredients, but then all the best examples of a true irish red use red x/munich/carafa III lol



« Last Edit: July 07, 2022, 08:28:14 am by fredthecat »

Offline Megary

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Re: Irish Red Ale
« Reply #22 on: July 07, 2022, 09:09:02 am »
Last year I made my one and only Irish Red that was:
80% 2-Row
16% 20L Munich
3.5% 57L Med. British Crystal
0.5% Carafa II

Came out red enough for me.  Wasn't "malty" but there was a touch of sweetness. Finished dry. Hopped with Willamette. Used 1450, dropped very clear.

Very happy with it, even if I have no idea what an Irish Red really is, other than "red".

There's a picture of it here that doesn't really do the color justice, poor choice of background.

Offline Iliff Ave

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Re: Irish Red Ale
« Reply #23 on: July 07, 2022, 09:24:57 am »
Red x is too malty for me at 100%. I like to split it with Pilsner malt and build back the the color with carafa. Of course that’s not for an Irish red however I could see that work with MO or GP

then entering the world of "no true irish red ale would use a german malt" lol

it's the funniest style classification ever tbh - "it has to be RED, it has to be um irish" yet it did not exist in ireland and i can't remember ever hearing about one using say malting co. of ireland ingredients, but then all the best examples of a true irish red use red x/munich/carafa III lol
If I was to brew one myself I would use UK ingredients...

Marris Otter, UK crystal, UK roasted barley, EKG hops, Irish ale yeast. Done.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2022, 09:27:19 am by Iliff Ave »
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Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Re: Irish Red Ale
« Reply #24 on: July 07, 2022, 11:51:35 am »
Well, since all of my grain in the store room is of German origin, this might be a German Red Ale!
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Offline denny

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Re: Irish Red Ale
« Reply #25 on: July 07, 2022, 11:54:49 am »
Well, since all of my grain in the store room is of German origin, this might be a German Red Ale!

And the correct answer is that it doesn't matter.  If someone wants to be truly authentic, they need to use French grain.
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Offline jeffy

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Re: Irish Red Ale
« Reply #26 on: July 07, 2022, 12:37:17 pm »
A friend of mine was one of the original brewers at McGuire's.  He said that he would look at his brewers log and tell me how they used to make it, but that was quite a while ago.  Who knows what changes they may have made.  I'll post his notes as soon as he sends them to me.
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Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Re: Irish Red Ale
« Reply #27 on: July 07, 2022, 01:07:05 pm »
A friend of mine was one of the original brewers at McGuire's.  He said that he would look at his brewers log and tell me how they used to make it, but that was quite a while ago.  Who knows what changes they may have made.  I'll post his notes as soon as he sends them to me.

Bloody fantastic, mate!

My wife had their Stout, and the rest of us had the Irish Red. Great beer, very good Pub!
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Offline Iliff Ave

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Re: Irish Red Ale
« Reply #28 on: July 07, 2022, 02:01:33 pm »
Obviously the BJCP guidelines recognized it as a style with guidelines. They're pretty easy to follow...

By the sounds of it here you could brew a pretty basic american amber and call it good...
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Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Re: Irish Red Ale
« Reply #29 on: July 07, 2022, 03:03:24 pm »
Obviously the BJCP guidelines recognized it as a style with guidelines. They're pretty easy to follow...

By the sounds of it here you could brew a pretty basic american amber and call it good...

Depending on the info from McGuire's, the plan will be to brew with German malt since we have so much of it in stock, and S-04 yeast. English hops, most likely.

But for purely cosmetic purposes, it has to be red!
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