Author Topic: Pasteurizing Fermented Cider  (Read 332 times)

Offline tommymorris

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Pasteurizing Fermented Cider
« on: July 16, 2022, 12:10:14 pm »
I’ve just started making cider for my wife. I’ve done two batches so far. I’m kegging them. I have a question.

Before back-sweetening I have been pasteurizing the fermented cider. I heat it to 160F and hold for 10 minutes.  I don’t have any of the chemicals typically used to kill yeast and this is pretty easy. The two ciders I have made taste great. I don’t see much if anything about this method online.

Is there an advantage to chemical pasteurization (sulfites/sorbates) over this heat method?

Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Pasteurizing Fermented Cider
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2022, 12:19:22 pm »
You can destroy the delicate flavors with heat
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Offline Thirsty_Monk

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Re: Pasteurizing Fermented Cider
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2022, 01:00:46 pm »
I’ve just started making cider for my wife. I’ve done two batches so far. I’m kegging them. I have a question.

Before back-sweetening I have been pasteurizing the fermented cider. I heat it to 160F and hold for 10 minutes.  I don’t have any of the chemicals typically used to kill yeast and this is pretty easy. The two ciders I have made taste great. I don’t see much if anything about this method online.

Is there an advantage to chemical pasteurization (sulfites/sorbates) over this heat method?
I have recently attended seminar about N/A beer and there was a little bit talk about pasteurization.

Now this is what I recall.
Pasteurization is measured in PU units.
Let say 1 min at 175F can achieve the same PU as 30 min at 140F. (You would have to find exact time and temp by yourself)

You should pasteurize the packaged product (can, bottle, keg).

Higher temp / less time will get you better results (taste wise) then lower temp / more time.

Now how to pasteurize final product if you do not have pasteurization tunnel?
You could do it in home canner for bottles and cans and boil kettle if you have keg.

Word of caution be extremely careful. Wear PPE. 175F water can cause 3 - the degree burns and that is not fun at all.
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Offline chinaski

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Re: Pasteurizing Fermented Cider
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2022, 02:40:24 pm »
I’ve just started making cider for my wife. I’ve done two batches so far. I’m kegging them. I have a question.

Before back-sweetening I have been pasteurizing the fermented cider. I heat it to 160F and hold for 10 minutes.  I don’t have any of the chemicals typically used to kill yeast and this is pretty easy. The two ciders I have made taste great. I don’t see much if anything about this method online.

Is there an advantage to chemical pasteurization (sulfites/sorbates) over this heat method?
I would imagine that you lose some of the alcohol with your method.  If you are kegging them and keeping it cold maybe skipping the pasteurization step before back-sweetening wouldn't matter all that much.  Kegs are rated to very high pressures so a little extra but slow fermentation might not be such a big deal.

Offline tommymorris

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Re: Pasteurizing Fermented Cider
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2022, 03:23:21 pm »
You can destroy the delicate flavors with heat
I plan to try using a campden tablet in the future. But, for these first two batches, I have been very happy with the flavor.

Offline tommymorris

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Pasteurizing Fermented Cider
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2022, 03:28:27 pm »
I’ve just started making cider for my wife. I’ve done two batches so far. I’m kegging them. I have a question.

Before back-sweetening I have been pasteurizing the fermented cider. I heat it to 160F and hold for 10 minutes.  I don’t have any of the chemicals typically used to kill yeast and this is pretty easy. The two ciders I have made taste great. I don’t see much if anything about this method online.

Is there an advantage to chemical pasteurization (sulfites/sorbates) over this heat method?
I would imagine that you lose some of the alcohol with your method.  If you are kegging them and keeping it cold maybe skipping the pasteurization step before back-sweetening wouldn't matter all that much.  Kegs are rated to very high pressures so a little extra but slow fermentation might not be such a big deal.
Ethanol boils at 173F.  So, by keeping it at 160F or less I don’t think I will lose very much alcohol.

I have thought about skipping the pasteurization also. I know the kegs can handle the pressure but my wife is picky. She doesn’t like dry cider so I was trying to avoid any extra fermentation. I also wonder if the likelihood of fermentation in the keg is related to yeast variety. So far, I made a batch with S-04 and S-23. I kinda worried the S-23 might ferment at fridge temps. But, I think I will try skipping pasteurization on a future batch. The S-04 was great and S-04 probably doesn’t ferment at 37F.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2022, 03:56:23 pm by tommymorris »

Offline tommymorris

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Re: Pasteurizing Fermented Cider
« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2022, 03:34:53 pm »
I’ve just started making cider for my wife. I’ve done two batches so far. I’m kegging them. I have a question.

Before back-sweetening I have been pasteurizing the fermented cider. I heat it to 160F and hold for 10 minutes.  I don’t have any of the chemicals typically used to kill yeast and this is pretty easy. The two ciders I have made taste great. I don’t see much if anything about this method online.

Is there an advantage to chemical pasteurization (sulfites/sorbates) over this heat method?
I have recently attended seminar about N/A beer and there was a little bit talk about pasteurization.

Now this is what I recall.
Pasteurization is measured in PU units.
Let say 1 min at 175F can achieve the same PU as 30 min at 140F. (You would have to find exact time and temp by yourself)

You should pasteurize the packaged product (can, bottle, keg).

Higher temp / less time will get you better results (taste wise) then lower temp / more time.

Now how to pasteurize final product if you do not have pasteurization tunnel?
You could do it in home canner for bottles and cans and boil kettle if you have keg.

Word of caution be extremely careful. Wear PPE. 175F water can cause 3 - the degree burns and that is not fun at all.
I am breaking one of those rules for sure. I am heating the hard cider in a pot before kegging.  I have worried about oxidation with my method.  But, I haven’t picked up any tastes i would associate with oxidation.

I have seen the PU concept you mention and I think the 160F for 10 minutes complies.