Author Topic: Gelatin  (Read 2928 times)

Offline gmac

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Re: Gelatin
« Reply #15 on: May 04, 2011, 02:36:53 PM »
Are we talking about any special gelatin finings or just plain old unflavoured gelatin packs from the grocery store?  I ordered some finings but maybe I should have gone with packets if they work.

Offline tygo

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Re: Gelatin
« Reply #16 on: May 04, 2011, 02:38:12 PM »
Unflavored gelatin from the grocery store works just fine.
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Offline gmac

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Re: Gelatin
« Reply #17 on: May 10, 2011, 06:25:37 PM »
I'd already ordered gelatin finings before this thread came up.
Now I have them and there's no instruction or anything on the package.  What is with people selling stuff with no instructions?
So, can anyone suggest to me what I need to do with this?  I'm hoping to keg the beer on Thursday in the morning and cool it and then do the finings later and force carb.
Also, good advice on force carbing wouldnt' hurt either...
Thanks

Offline tygo

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Re: Gelatin
« Reply #18 on: May 10, 2011, 06:58:13 PM »
Heat up about a cup of water in the microwave to 170F or so.  Whisk in a 1/2 teaspoon of gelatin.  Let it set for a few minutes.  Add to the cold beer in the secondary or keg.  Wait a few days for it to settle out.
Clint
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On Tap: Lucifer's Hammer Golden Strong Ale, Dopplebock, Old Fuzzynut's Ale

Offline gmac

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Re: Gelatin
« Reply #19 on: May 10, 2011, 07:55:39 PM »
Thanks.  Wasn't sure if this was the same as grocery store gelatin.  It seems like a very fine powder but I've never bought the store brand either, just JELL-O. 
I'll give it a go.

Offline jeffy

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Re: Gelatin
« Reply #20 on: May 11, 2011, 04:34:30 AM »
I find it easier to stir into the liquid before I heat it up.  Add some to the water (or beer) and let it bloom, then stir and heat.  When I add it to hot liquid it clumps up and takes a lot of stirring.
Then while still hot add it to cool beer.
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Offline Mark G

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Re: Gelatin
« Reply #21 on: May 11, 2011, 05:20:41 AM »
I'll usually mix it into some room temp water and let it sit for 15-20 min, then heat it up to 170-180ish in the microwave and dump it in while still hot. Just do yourself a favor and don't smell it before you put it in your beer...  Now that I've said that, you won't be able to help yourself and will smell it, so don't be shocked with how bad it smells.  ;)
Mark Gres

Offline SpanishCastleAle

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Re: Gelatin
« Reply #22 on: May 11, 2011, 09:39:44 AM »
More gelatine info.  This is from braukaiser.com from the How pH Affects Brewing article:
Quote
Collagen is a very effective clarifier which is used after fermentation is complete. It is the effective compound in isinglass and gelatin. Collagen is a protein that, depending on its origin and processing has an isoelectic point of ~5.5 (isinglass) [Alton], 7.0 – 9.0 (type A gelatin) or 4.7-5.4 (type B gelatin) [GMIA]. Isinglass is produced from the swim bladder of tropical fish; gelatin on the other hand is either made from pig skin and feet (type A) or bovine (cow) parts (type B).
So it seems Type A is not kosher if that matters to you or any of your friends/family (Type B may not be kosher either but I don't know).
Then a bit later:
Quote
Because of its wide availability, almost every grocery store carries it, most brewers use Knox unflavored gelatin if they need to clarify a beer. Knox gelatin is made from pork and therefore type A [Kraftfoods].

I do it the way Noonan describes in Brewing Lager Beer (or at least I started there, I may have diverged a bit).  IIRC, it's 1/8 tsp per gallon beer (I use a heaping 1/2 tsp), ~3/4 cup water at ~170* F, add to cold beer and add it before the temp of the gelatine mixture drops below 120* F, mix well.
Wait.
Profit.

Offline gmac

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Re: Gelatin
« Reply #23 on: May 13, 2011, 08:20:53 AM »
One last question before I go do this.
Yesterday I racked into a spare carboy to help settle and the beer is now cold and ready to go into a keg where I will add gelatin.  I'm unclear how to mix well without oxygenating so if I filled the keg 1/2 way and then poured the 3/4 cup of gelatin into the keg and finished filling, would the siphon action be enough to mix the gelatin throughout?  Or does it have to go on the top for some reason?  Yes, I see that this is really two questions.

Offline brians

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Re: Gelatin
« Reply #24 on: May 13, 2011, 08:59:15 AM »
What has been everyone's experience with using gelatin in beers with haze due to dry hop?

Offline Beer Monger

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Re: Gelatin
« Reply #25 on: May 13, 2011, 09:04:58 AM »
Can you gelatin in seving kegs or do you need to rack it off to another keg after using the gelatin? 
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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Gelatin
« Reply #26 on: May 13, 2011, 09:23:04 AM »
One last question before I go do this.
Yesterday I racked into a spare carboy to help settle and the beer is now cold and ready to go into a keg where I will add gelatin.  I'm unclear how to mix well without oxygenating so if I filled the keg 1/2 way and then poured the 3/4 cup of gelatin into the keg and finished filling, would the siphon action be enough to mix the gelatin throughout?  Or does it have to go on the top for some reason?  Yes, I see that this is really two questions.

I don't think you need to worry about mixing the gelatin.  My understanding is that you want to dump it into the full carboy and let it settle.

Due to the positive/negative charged ions (or whatever the science is) it clarifies the beer as it settles through it.

Clarifying a dry hopped beer, AFAIK, is likely to reduce the effectiveness of the dry hopping.

You can clarify in the serving keg.  Some people cut a dip tube short for this, some blast out the gunk in the first pint or two.  YMMV.  I haven't used gelatin in years, but I recall some lumpy gelatin clumps getting into a few bottles.  No big deal unless you're not careful on the pour.

Time and cold will clarify your beer pretty damn well if you're not in a hurry.
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Offline Tim McManus

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Re: Gelatin
« Reply #27 on: May 13, 2011, 10:13:12 AM »
Can you gelatin in seving kegs or do you need to rack it off to another keg after using the gelatin? 

I've added it to the serving keg after it was carbonated and still served it.

Just remember to have a pitcher or an extra glass ready when you pour for the first time.  You might get a bit of schmutz in the glass but every pour after that should be crystal clear.
Tim McManus
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Offline Beer Monger

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Re: Gelatin
« Reply #28 on: May 13, 2011, 10:28:22 AM »
Can you gelatin in seving kegs or do you need to rack it off to another keg after using the gelatin? 

I've added it to the serving keg after it was carbonated and still served it.

Just remember to have a pitcher or an extra glass ready when you pour for the first time.  You might get a bit of schmutz in the glass but every pour after that should be crystal clear.

OK. Thanks.  And yeah, I expect a little 'gunk' the first few pints. 
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