Membership questions? Log in issues? Email info@brewersassociation.org

Author Topic: SNS for Lagers  (Read 1622 times)

Offline jd.knightjr

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 7
SNS for Lagers
« on: September 20, 2022, 01:45:26 pm »
   Hey Guys. I've read through various SNS threads but haven't seen an answer to this question in regards to a specific concern I have (apologies if I missed it): Will pitching a room temp SNS starter into colder wort cause the yeast to go dormant or drop out of suspension? I want to start my lager fermentation cold, around 46F, and let it rise to main fermentation temp of 49F. Will pitching the room temp SNS starter into this cold 46F wort have adverse affects on yeast performance?
   I've been brewing for a year and producing not-so-great beer. I now wonder if overpitching with shear stressed, stir-plate yeast is the cause of my poor results. I stumbled upon the SNS method in this forum a few days ago and am hoping this method will sort me out. I have been using brewunited's starter calculator with MrMalty's viability percentages. I appreciate any thoughts and opinions you guys have. Thanks.

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 27167
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • Dennybrew
Re: SNS for Lagers
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2022, 01:48:09 pm »
« Last Edit: September 20, 2022, 01:50:02 pm by denny »
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline jd.knightjr

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 7
Re: SNS for Lagers
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2022, 06:28:13 pm »
Thanks, Denny!

Offline purduekenn

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 421
Re: SNS for Lagers
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2022, 08:01:45 am »
I usually chill lagers around 50-55F before pitching a SNS starter. The starter is at room temperature and I have not had any problems. I'm not an expert but this method has worked for me. Brew Your Own has a an article that includes pitching a warm starter at:  https://byo.com/mr-wizard/yeast-starter-temperature/. I don't use a stir plate just SNS starters.



« Last Edit: September 21, 2022, 10:19:32 am by purduekenn »

Offline jd.knightjr

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 7
Re: SNS for Lagers
« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2022, 11:12:29 am »
I usually chill lagers around 50-55F before pitching a SNS starter. The starter is at room temperature and I have not had any problems. I'm not an expert but this method has worked for me. Brew Your Own has a an article that includes pitching a warm starter at:  https://byo.com/mr-wizard/yeast-starter-temperature/. I don't use a stir plate just SNS starters.




Thanks for sharing your experience and the article link. Good info.

Offline Kevin

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 734
  • Great beer. Less work. More fun.
Re: SNS for Lagers
« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2022, 12:21:25 pm »
In my experience, it works fine.  I've done it many times.  Here is additional info if you're interested...

https://www.experimentalbrew.com/blogs/saccharomyces/shaken-not-stirred-stir-plate-myth-buster

https://www.experimentalbrew.com/blogs/saccharomyces/yeast-cultures-are-nuclear-weapons

What is Mark Van Dita's background? Just curious about where his knowledge of yeast came from.
“He was a wise man who invented beer.”
- Plato

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 27167
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • Dennybrew
Re: SNS for Lagers
« Reply #6 on: September 21, 2022, 12:56:12 pm »
In my experience, it works fine.  I've done it many times.  Here is additional info if you're interested...

https://www.experimentalbrew.com/blogs/saccharomyces/shaken-not-stirred-stir-plate-myth-buster

https://www.experimentalbrew.com/blogs/saccharomyces/yeast-cultures-are-nuclear-weapons

What is Mark Van Dita's background? Just curious about where his knowledge of yeast came from.

Through extensive study on his own for years.  Backed up by his epxerience and that of many others.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline Richard

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1027
Re: SNS for Lagers
« Reply #7 on: September 21, 2022, 01:38:34 pm »
...
   I've been brewing for a year and producing not-so-great beer. I now wonder if overpitching with shear stressed, stir-plate yeast is the cause of my poor results...
I doubt that shear stress on the yeast is causing your beer to be poor. I think that if it is a factor it is a very small one, perhaps making the difference between great beer and really great beer, not between good beer and poor beer. Go ahead and try it, but you should probably take a look at the rest of your process, too.
Original Gravity - that would be Newton's

Offline tommymorris

  • Official Poobah of No Life. (I Got Ban Hammered by Drew)
  • *********
  • Posts: 3869
Re: SNS for Lagers
« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2022, 05:28:04 pm »
...
   I've been brewing for a year and producing not-so-great beer. I now wonder if overpitching with shear stressed, stir-plate yeast is the cause of my poor results...
I doubt that shear stress on the yeast is causing your beer to be poor. I think that if it is a factor it is a very small one, perhaps making the difference between great beer and really great beer, not between good beer and poor beer. Go ahead and try it, but you should probably take a look at the rest of your process, too.
I agree. Lots of great beer has been made with stir plate starters.

Offline purduekenn

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 421
Re: SNS for Lagers
« Reply #9 on: September 21, 2022, 05:48:28 pm »
...
   I've been brewing for a year and producing not-so-great beer. I now wonder if overpitching with shear stressed, stir-plate yeast is the cause of my poor results...
I doubt that shear stress on the yeast is causing your beer to be poor. I think that if it is a factor it is a very small one, perhaps making the difference between great beer and really great beer, not between good beer and poor beer. Go ahead and try it, but you should probably take a look at the rest of your process, too.

I agree. Lots of great beer has been made with stir plate starters.
I know many brewers use stir plates and like the results. 

Offline Wilbur

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 876
Re: SNS for Lagers
« Reply #10 on: September 21, 2022, 08:01:35 pm »
Lance at Omega Yeast has advocated pitching warm (60's I believe) and chilling to fermentation temp for lagers. I haven't tried it, but I've had a lot of great yeast from them.

Sent from my Pixel 4a using Tapatalk


Offline Village Taphouse

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2366
  • Ken from Chicago
    • The new Mayfair Court Brewhouse
Re: SNS for Lagers
« Reply #11 on: September 21, 2022, 08:49:40 pm »
...
   I've been brewing for a year and producing not-so-great beer. I now wonder if overpitching with shear stressed, stir-plate yeast is the cause of my poor results...
I doubt that shear stress on the yeast is causing your beer to be poor. I think that if it is a factor it is a very small one, perhaps making the difference between great beer and really great beer, not between good beer and poor beer. Go ahead and try it, but you should probably take a look at the rest of your process, too.
I agree. Lots of great beer has been made with stir plate starters.
I have made many stirplate starters and only 2-3 SNS starters.  They both work for me.  As far as I can tell, there is no reason to wring your hands over making a starter using a stirplate.  I have been brewing since 1999 and I have made MANY batches of beer (mostly lager) with stirplate starters and the results have been more than I have ever wanted. 
Ken from Chicago. 
A day without beer is like... just kidding, I have no idea.

Offline fredthecat

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1945
Re: SNS for Lagers
« Reply #12 on: September 22, 2022, 04:56:31 pm »

   I've been brewing for a year and producing not-so-great beer. I now wonder if overpitching with shear stressed, stir-plate yeast is the cause of my poor results. I stumbled upon the SNS method in this forum a few days ago and am hoping this method will sort me out. I have been using brewunited's starter calculator with MrMalty's viability percentages. I appreciate any thoughts and opinions you guys have. Thanks.

What kinds of issues do you find with your various beers?

Offline jd.knightjr

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 7
Re: SNS for Lagers
« Reply #13 on: September 26, 2022, 11:06:59 am »
...
   I've been brewing for a year and producing not-so-great beer. I now wonder if overpitching with shear stressed, stir-plate yeast is the cause of my poor results...
I doubt that shear stress on the yeast is causing your beer to be poor. I think that if it is a factor it is a very small one, perhaps making the difference between great beer and really great beer, not between good beer and poor beer. Go ahead and try it, but you should probably take a look at the rest of your process, too.

You have a good point. I've thought critically about my process from start to finish and can't come up with the cause of my lack luster performance. I feel like there must be an "IT" factor that I'm just not getting. If the SNS doesn't improve my situation, then i'll have to look at another aspect of my process.

Offline jd.knightjr

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 7
Re: SNS for Lagers
« Reply #14 on: September 26, 2022, 11:13:29 am »

   I've been brewing for a year and producing not-so-great beer. I now wonder if overpitching with shear stressed, stir-plate yeast is the cause of my poor results. I stumbled upon the SNS method in this forum a few days ago and am hoping this method will sort me out. I have been using brewunited's starter calculator with MrMalty's viability percentages. I appreciate any thoughts and opinions you guys have. Thanks.

What kinds of issues do you find with your various beers?

For my lagers (mostly pilsners) I get a weird off flavor/aroma that I originally thought was DMS, then I thought was residual sulfur, and now maybe stressed yeast. Two months post brew day and the flavor/aroma is still present in the fermenter. I'm wondering if I'm overpitching or pitching stressed yeast.