Author Topic: Finicky Eaters?  (Read 2323 times)

Offline markaberrant

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Re: Finicky Eaters?
« Reply #15 on: September 30, 2010, 10:47:06 AM »
My wife and I are good cooks, we rarely ever eat out and that's how our kids were raised.  We also always had  a veggie garden so from the time my kids could crawl they were eating straight from the garden-literally.  I have pictures of my 8 month old daughter eating tomatoes still on the plant, and my son would pull carrots, wipe some dirt off and start eating.  We never harvested enough broccoli because once the head got a couple of inches across a kid would eat it.  To this day they love veggies.

Yup, I have fond memories of doing the same thing as a child with my dad and grandfather.  My favourite was kohlrabi.

It is all about appreciating simple, basic foods that are high quality.  Sorta like homebrew!

Offline glitterbug

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Re: Finicky Eaters?
« Reply #16 on: September 30, 2010, 08:56:31 PM »
I couldn't care less what other people eat and I don't think I have the right to judge what other people do with their bodies.
A witty saying proves nothing - Voltaire

Offline euge

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Re: Finicky Eaters?
« Reply #17 on: October 01, 2010, 03:43:21 PM »
Which of course is your peragotive.  I however think the subject is fascinating. 

Am I being judgmental? Certainly. Hard not to be in some circumstances.

Ever see a toddler staggering around like drunk with a bag of Flaming Hot Cheetos in one hand and a bottle of Big Red in the other? Face and hands stained an artificial crimson?

I see it nearly everyday. Hard to not judge when their obese elder siblings have developed health problems and already have silver caps on their milk teeth. Hard to get a kid to eat anything conventional and halfway healthy after lavishing junk-food upon them from the start!
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Finicky Eaters?
« Reply #18 on: October 01, 2010, 04:21:00 PM »
+1

I care where it applies to my family. Its really good for a kid to grow up in a house where there is cooking. In fact I think cooking goes hand and hand with having kids. It not only provides healthier meals it makes family bonding time. Not only are you preparing and sharing a meal together you are creating a family environment that kids will remember in their adulthood.

Plus being around that they will learn skills that will last their whole life. Learning how to cook and eat right will make life less expensive, tastier and probably healthier.

Two rules for our grocery list.

1. Whole foods.(some things organic like milk and the problem produce)

2. If not whole food then nothing with artificial colors / flavors or lots of other crap. Short Ingredient lists basically.
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Offline nicneufeld

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Re: Finicky Eaters?
« Reply #19 on: October 01, 2010, 06:00:09 PM »
Learning how to cook and eat right will make life less expensive, tastier and probably healthier.

The triumvirate goals of good cooking.  Great taste, economy, and good nutrition.  I have kind of gone in that order.  First started being able to cook things that were tasty, then figured out how to do so efficiently without triple digit grocery bills, and more recently I've been trying to retain the first two while improving the third.

I dislike many types of raw veggies.  But I love cooking with them, and a few of them raw are nice.  I'm partial to thinly sliced cucumbers and spinach.

Offline markaberrant

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Re: Finicky Eaters?
« Reply #20 on: October 02, 2010, 07:45:33 AM »
Plus being around that they will learn skills that will last their whole life. Learning how to cook and eat right will make life less expensive, tastier and probably healthier.

Don't forget the whole social experience of cooking and sharing a meal with friends and family.  And then throw on top of that the opportunity to grow some of your own produce and/or getting to know local producers.
« Last Edit: October 02, 2010, 07:49:02 AM by markaberrant »

Offline markaberrant

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Re: Finicky Eaters?
« Reply #21 on: October 02, 2010, 07:47:25 AM »
Ever see a toddler staggering around like drunk with a bag of Flaming Hot Cheetos in one hand and a bottle of Big Red in the other? Face and hands stained an artificial crimson?

I was walking into a store this week (can't remember which one), and a very young toddler in a shopping cart was howling on the way out the door.  The mom says, "don't worry, we'll get you a slurpee right away."

I just about wanted to puke when I heard that.  If that makes me judgmental, so be it.

Offline beerocd

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Re: Finicky Eaters?
« Reply #22 on: October 02, 2010, 08:48:05 AM »
.  I'm partial to thinly sliced cucumbers and spinach. FETA

much better now.  ;D
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Finicky Eaters?
« Reply #23 on: October 02, 2010, 09:23:13 AM »
We make cucumber salad a lot.Thinly sliced cucumbers mixed into a dressing of mayonnaise, vinegar, sugar, salt and black pepper.

Its one of those things that is better the next day.

cucumbers and spinach sounds like an odd combination. Is that a hot dish?

We cook cucumbers quite a bit in a few dishes. People always ask what it is cause it is different when it is cooked.
« Last Edit: October 02, 2010, 09:24:46 AM by capozzoli »
Beer, its whats for dinner.

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Offline glitterbug

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Re: Finicky Eaters?
« Reply #24 on: October 02, 2010, 01:54:50 PM »
I see it nearly everyday. Hard to not judge when their obese elder siblings have developed health problems and already have silver caps on their milk teeth. Hard to get a kid to eat anything conventional and halfway healthy after lavishing junk-food upon them from the start!

I know it is popular to attack the fatties, but one day judgmental people who "know whats best for you" will come for your bacon and your beer  :D

(For the record: I am a firm believer in a healthy lifestyle)
A witty saying proves nothing - Voltaire

Offline bluesman

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Re: Finicky Eaters?
« Reply #25 on: October 02, 2010, 05:45:12 PM »
(For the record: I am a firm believer in a healthy lifestyle)

Nothing wrong with that...I try to but sometimes you just have to say (insert your own expression)
I try to balance my diet but it takes an effort of which I struggle to muster up sometimes.

I am an avid gardener...I love fresh tomatoes and cucumbers.
One of my favorite starters is sliced mozzarella chese topped with fresh tomato and red onion with a sprinkle of fresh basil
dressed with aged balsamic vinegar and EVOO (for the RR fans)...salt and pepper. Shazaam!!!

Back on topic: My wife can be finicky when it comes to spiced foods.  :(
I have to apply spice on the side which can be difficult sometimes.
« Last Edit: October 02, 2010, 05:57:50 PM by bluesman »
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Offline nicneufeld

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Re: Finicky Eaters?
« Reply #26 on: October 02, 2010, 05:55:55 PM »
cucumbers and spinach sounds like an odd combination. Is that a hot dish?

No, while I don't always pair them together, they go well together in a cold, unpickled salad.  Slice the cucumber thin enough to be nearly translucent and line a bowl with it, add fresh spinach or baby spinach, sprinkle on some sunflower seeds (and sliced olives if we're feeling rich) and a sprinkling of a good italian dressing.  Simple, quick, and a very common prelude to a meal at our house.  I like to serve it while I am still cooking dinner.

Personally speaking, in a contest between a judgemental person and a frazzled parent of a wailing toddler, tie always goes to the mother with the toddler.  But YMMV.  Speaking of, my 2 1/2 yr old daughter has never tasted a Slurpee!  It may very well be about damn time!  :D 

Offline markaberrant

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Re: Finicky Eaters?
« Reply #27 on: October 03, 2010, 07:29:44 AM »
No, while I don't always pair them together, they go well together in a cold, unpickled salad.  Slice the cucumber thin enough to be nearly translucent and line a bowl with it, add fresh spinach or baby spinach, sprinkle on some sunflower seeds (and sliced olives if we're feeling rich) and a sprinkling of a good italian dressing.  Simple, quick, and a very common prelude to a meal at our house.  I like to serve it while I am still cooking dinner.

I pretty much made this exact salad last night, but with tomatoes too!  Had it with rosemary lemon halibut.

Offline EHall

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Re: Finicky Eaters?
« Reply #28 on: October 06, 2010, 02:02:52 PM »
My wife is very picky. Our first kid was very picky but eventually grew out of it and started trying new things, shes glad she did.
My youngest started off basically trying everything and for the most part liking it.. then as she got older she started liking less and less, example: she used to eat broccoli and corn as a baby, now wont touch it. But shes gone on what I first concidered a downward spiral eating less and less and limiting herself to basically only the 'crappy' stuff. She even got the point on not wanting to eat meat, which baffled all of us as we're meat/potatos folks. But shes coming back around. I chalk it up to cycles. But I also think it has alot to do with what a mother eats while shes pregnant and texture in foods is a big thing too. My youngest used to love a bean and cheese burrito, then BAM one day hated cheese. I know at one point she was eating to fast and choked on a chunk of melted cheese, I think this had something to do with it as well as the texture. I've found that certain things she doesn't like have a 'mushy' texture to them, mashed potatos is a good example. I've also learned from my parents that 'everything in moderation' won't kill someone, and that with the right 'prodding/motivation' she'll try new things. I'm pretty sure she'll come around some day just like her older sister so I'm not to worried about it.. in the meantime I've taught her that fast food is junk and we stay away from it as much as possible... now my wife.. I don't think she'll ever change but she does surprise me every once in  while with trying something new.
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Offline corkybstewart

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Re: Finicky Eaters?
« Reply #29 on: October 06, 2010, 07:05:58 PM »
Both of my kids learned to cook well and its made a big difference in their lives.  They understand the connection between nutrition and food(not the same thing), and even more they treat mealtime as a time of socialization and relaxation as opposed to a time to stuff their faces.  They enjoy experimenting with ingredients and recipes, and they love to cook for their friends who are strangely amazed that people still cook their own food.  Last weekend my daughter's friend watched me shelling peas and kept saying "that's awesome, how did you learn to do that?"  How bizarre that a 26 year old had never shelled peas.  Teach your kids to cook and they'll appreciate it all their lives.
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