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Author Topic: Whirlpool Hops Temperature Range  (Read 2134 times)

Offline HopDen

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Whirlpool Hops Temperature Range
« on: November 06, 2022, 08:22:18 am »
I have always added whirlpool hops at 185* but is there a better temperature to whirlpool/steep those additions? Is there an optimum range for extracting the most flavor/aroma compounds?

Offline BrewBama

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Re: Whirlpool Hops Temperature Range
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2022, 08:26:47 am »
There’s a lot of debate on this. I settled on 140°F for 30 min.


*Disclaimer*: Any comment I add is simply the way I brew beer. There are certainly other ways that can be equally effective which other brewers may contribute. This is what I’ve found that works for me using my equipment and processes so I offer this for your consideration. YMMV

Offline denny

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Re: Whirlpool Hops Temperature Range
« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2022, 08:54:35 am »
I once accidentally added them at 125 and got the best results I've had, so I'm in the same range as BrewBama
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Offline HopDen

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Re: Whirlpool Hops Temperature Range
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2022, 09:24:41 am »
There’s a lot of debate on this. I settled on 140°F for 30 min.


*Disclaimer*: Any comment I add is simply the way I brew beer. There are certainly other ways that can be equally effective which other brewers may contribute. This is what I’ve found that works for me using my equipment and processes so I offer this for your consideration. YMMV

Thanks for replying BB
Do you have any links to such debate?

Ok, since I am brewing an WCIPA today, 140* it is! I have 1 keg left on tap of the same recipe where the whirlpool hops were done at 185* so at least I can compare. Hopefully age hasn't diminished it too far for comparison.
« Last Edit: November 06, 2022, 09:41:08 am by HopDen »



Offline erockrph

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Re: Whirlpool Hops Temperature Range
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2022, 08:17:32 pm »
IIRC, Ray Daniels ran a test years ago and the best results were at 185F for 80 minutes. I typically start at 195, then set my Foundry for 175F and let it hover there.

If I'm going to do an extended whirlpool, then I don't bother with less than 45-60 minutes. Any shorter than that, then my results aren't much different than doing a flameout addition and chill per usual.
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Offline soymateofeo

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Re: Whirlpool Hops Temperature Range
« Reply #7 on: November 25, 2022, 08:58:06 am »
Wow.  I whirlpool for 20 mins at 170.  I will extend that another 30-40 minutes after reading these comments

Offline trapae

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Re: Whirlpool Hops Temperature Range
« Reply #8 on: December 16, 2022, 06:48:18 am »
I do 170 for 45 minutes. I’ve done 185 as well and found that there was significantly more bitterness in the final product and then 170.
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Offline Joe_Beer

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Re: Whirlpool Hops Temperature Range
« Reply #9 on: December 24, 2022, 06:04:59 am »
Seems like it would be best to add the hops at, or above, the temperature needed to pastuerize any microbes. The FDA says this is 145F (for milk) for a 30 minute duration. I don't know if the fact we're talking wort makes any difference.

I've always read that isomerization happens at/above 180F but did a month-long dry hop one time with a 1/4oz of Amarillo in some cider.  Friends stated it was somewhat bitter and it's always puzzled me because the temp wasn't high enough to isomerize.

This morning, this thread had me turn up a blog post by Beersmith stating isomerization DOES happen at lower temps (even 122F), however utilization is much lower.  I had no idea. This would explain the bitterness in the cider with the ridiculous amount of contact time. Cool!

Offline neuse

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Re: Whirlpool Hops Temperature Range
« Reply #10 on: December 24, 2022, 08:00:53 am »
Seems like it would be best to add the hops at, or above, the temperature needed to pastuerize any microbes. The FDA says this is 145F (for milk) for a 30 minute duration. I don't know if the fact we're talking wort makes any difference.

I've always read that isomerization happens at/above 180F but did a month-long dry hop one time with a 1/4oz of Amarillo in some cider.  Friends stated it was somewhat bitter and it's always puzzled me because the temp wasn't high enough to isomerize.

This morning, this thread had me turn up a blog post by Beersmith stating isomerization DOES happen at lower temps (even 122F), however utilization is much lower.  I had no idea. This would explain the bitterness in the cider with the ridiculous amount of contact time. Cool!
This article gives some specifics about utilization at lower temeratures: https://alchemyoverlord.wordpress.com/2016/03/06/an-analysis-of-sub-boiling-hop-utilization/

Offline denny

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Re: Whirlpool Hops Temperature Range
« Reply #11 on: December 24, 2022, 08:36:43 am »
Seems like it would be best to add the hops at, or above, the temperature needed to pastuerize any microbes. The FDA says this is 145F (for milk) for a 30 minute duration. I don't know if the fact we're talking wort makes any difference.

I've always read that isomerization happens at/above 180F but did a month-long dry hop one time with a 1/4oz of Amarillo in some cider.  Friends stated it was somewhat bitter and it's always puzzled me because the temp wasn't high enough to isomerize.

This morning, this thread had me turn up a blog post by Beersmith stating isomerization DOES happen at lower temps (even 122F), however utilization is much lower.  I had no idea. This would explain the bitterness in the cider with the ridiculous amount of contact time. Cool!

Many people confuse the astringency from late hop additions with bitterness. Perhaps that was it.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline erockrph

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Re: Whirlpool Hops Temperature Range
« Reply #12 on: December 24, 2022, 01:00:53 pm »
Seems like it would be best to add the hops at, or above, the temperature needed to pastuerize any microbes. The FDA says this is 145F (for milk) for a 30 minute duration. I don't know if the fact we're talking wort makes any difference.

I've always read that isomerization happens at/above 180F but did a month-long dry hop one time with a 1/4oz of Amarillo in some cider.  Friends stated it was somewhat bitter and it's always puzzled me because the temp wasn't high enough to isomerize.

This morning, this thread had me turn up a blog post by Beersmith stating isomerization DOES happen at lower temps (even 122F), however utilization is much lower.  I had no idea. This would explain the bitterness in the cider with the ridiculous amount of contact time. Cool!

Many people confuse the astringency from late hop additions with bitterness. Perhaps that was it.
I've dry-hopped ciders in the past, but I gave up because there was some bitterness added by it. It wasn't much, but unlike beer there is no baseline bitterness to speak of in cider, so that small amount of bitterness sticks out. Or at least it did for me. There must be some other compounds in hops that are slightly soluble in cellar-temp liquids that can contribute bitterness other than just iso-AA's.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer