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Stout with Lactose

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wamille:
Question... does the addition of lactose cause a higher final gravity?  Lactose is fermentable?  It's not a type of dextrin that can't be digested by yeast, correct?  I made a milk stout with an OG of 1.055.  Currently (after 10 days) it is 1.017.  I'm using WLP 006... the Bedford Ale Yeast.  I would've thought that I would've gotten down to 1.010 at least.  Any thoughts?

euge:
Still contributes to gravity. Not fermentable.

Hey the 1.017 sounds fine. Don't worry.

tschmidlin:
Yeah, what euge said.  Adds to gravity, not fermentable.  It's a disaccharide, a sugar, but yeast don't have the right enzyme to break the bond between the galactose and glucose.  Depending on your recipe, 1.017 is totally reasonable.

wamille:
Thanks guys.  I'm getting ready to add about 30 ounces of cherries soaked in Woodford Select Bourbon into the beer when I keg it.  Do you think that will lower the gravity?  Will I need to add 1/3 cup corn sugar for priming?

anthayes:
That's why lactose is added to a milk stout - to leave some sweetness behind.

Milk stout was patented by Mackeson in 1907 as part of a trend towards sweeter beers, cf Manns Brown Ale invented in 1902.

These days in England a milk stout will have an OG less than 1.040, but an FG above 1.010.

Ant Hayes
Tonbridge, Kent

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