Author Topic: Stout with Lactose  (Read 2558 times)

Offline wamille

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Stout with Lactose
« on: September 24, 2010, 11:33:52 PM »
Question... does the addition of lactose cause a higher final gravity?  Lactose is fermentable?  It's not a type of dextrin that can't be digested by yeast, correct?  I made a milk stout with an OG of 1.055.  Currently (after 10 days) it is 1.017.  I'm using WLP 006... the Bedford Ale Yeast.  I would've thought that I would've gotten down to 1.010 at least.  Any thoughts?

Offline euge

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Re: Stout with Lactose
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2010, 12:07:47 AM »
Still contributes to gravity. Not fermentable.

Hey the 1.017 sounds fine. Don't worry.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Stout with Lactose
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2010, 12:18:01 AM »
Yeah, what euge said.  Adds to gravity, not fermentable.  It's a disaccharide, a sugar, but yeast don't have the right enzyme to break the bond between the galactose and glucose.  Depending on your recipe, 1.017 is totally reasonable.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline wamille

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Re: Stout with Lactose
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2010, 12:27:20 AM »
Thanks guys.  I'm getting ready to add about 30 ounces of cherries soaked in Woodford Select Bourbon into the beer when I keg it.  Do you think that will lower the gravity?  Will I need to add 1/3 cup corn sugar for priming?

Offline anthayes

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Re: Stout with Lactose
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2010, 12:30:59 AM »
That's why lactose is added to a milk stout - to leave some sweetness behind.

Milk stout was patented by Mackeson in 1907 as part of a trend towards sweeter beers, cf Manns Brown Ale invented in 1902.

These days in England a milk stout will have an OG less than 1.040, but an FG above 1.010.

Ant Hayes
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Stout with Lactose
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2010, 01:08:27 AM »
Thanks guys.  I'm getting ready to add about 30 ounces of cherries soaked in Woodford Select Bourbon into the beer when I keg it.  Do you think that will lower the gravity?  Will I need to add 1/3 cup corn sugar for priming?
I wouldn't do it that way.  I'd add the bourbon soaked cherries to secondary, and keg after a few weeks when the flavor has been melded. then keg with normal amounts of sugar, or just force carbonate it.   Don;t worry about the gravity per se.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline hokerer

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Re: Stout with Lactose
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2010, 06:20:06 AM »
When is lactose normally added?  If it can be added a bottling, it could be an interesting experiment in just how much to add.  That is, bottle a few, add some lactose, bottle a few more, add more lactose, etc. etc.
Joe

Offline wamille

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Re: Stout with Lactose
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2010, 02:14:51 PM »
I added my lactose at the final 15 minutes of the boil.  I wonder how many gravity points a half pound made to a final wort volume of 6 gallons?  The beer has a nice chocolately taste thus far after 10 days.

Offline anthayes

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Re: Stout with Lactose
« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2010, 03:28:45 AM »
When is lactose normally added?  If it can be added a bottling, it could be an interesting experiment in just how much to add.  That is, bottle a few, add some lactose, bottle a few more, add more lactose, etc. etc.

I prefer to add to the boil, from an infection point of view. I once had a lactic infection which I think came from adding lactose to the bottle (but I could be wrong).

Ant Hayes
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