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Author Topic: Glass rinser sanitation  (Read 418 times)

Offline irajacobs

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Glass rinser sanitation
« on: November 18, 2022, 10:50:58 pm »
Each year, our club (Placer Ultimate Brewing Society - PUBS) participates in a few festivals, brewfests, etc.  where attendees are issued a glass, and move from booth to booth sampling homebrew.  As a courtesy, our pouring members may provide glass rinsers to wash the stout residue out of a person's glass before pouring them a pilsner.  We have been using plain water for these 'upspray' rinsers (from a pressurized keg of water).  In the era of Covid, we have encountered some people who did not want their glass rinsed, because we do not sanitize the rinser between pours for different attendees.  I get that.  But in a bar, glass rinsers are typically used to cool and wet glasses that have ALREADY been cleaned and sanitized between customers.  I suspect sanitizers wouldn't really do much against viruses, but they would kill bacteria.  And if it makes people more comfortable to know some kind of sanitation is happening, I'm all for it.  The question is: How?
Use a keg of Starsan or a bar type final rinse sanitizer instead of plain water?
Use a spray bottle of Starsan on the glass rinser between customers?
It needs to be something quick and seemless (and hopefully something I already have - like Starsan).  Any Ideas?

Offline BrewBama

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« Last Edit: November 19, 2022, 04:58:24 am by BrewBama »

Offline irajacobs

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Re: Glass rinser sanitation
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2022, 01:57:15 pm »
Thanks BrewBama
I was aware that StarSan will make no claims against viruses like Covid (never been tested).  My question was more general.  Any sanitation product used either on or in the glass rinser has to be a "no rinse", food grade, taste and odor-free, non-toxic product.  That leaves out some I use in other situations (iodophor, chlorine products of any kind, etc).  I was curious whether others had faced the same situation, and had tried something they liked, and their method for using it.  In addition, some of the half dozen glass rinsers we use are painted/lacquered by us to match the theme of the event.  So the product cannot eat away the paint or finish (Starsan and vinegar are acidic, strong alcohol might strip paint, etc).  Looks like I may have to do my own testing.
I really appreciate your reply.  Our next event is a competition in April, but I may do some spot testing before that.  If so I will report any findings.
Thanks a lot!

Offline Kevin

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Re: Glass rinser sanitation
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2022, 07:29:18 am »
Unless you are going to wash everyone's sample glass for them before it touches the glass rinser it doesn't matter what sanitizer you use. I don't want my glass going rim down on a surface that has had everyone else's unwashed glass on it.
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Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Glass rinser sanitation
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2022, 08:11:57 am »
Maybe have a cleaner solution in a small kitchen tub and a sanitizer in a second tub, with water on the rinse, going in order: wash, rinse, sanitize, rinse, pour beer and serve.  Just a thought…
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"

Offline jeffy

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Re: Glass rinser sanitation
« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2022, 08:58:37 am »
If the concern is that the rim of the glass touches the rinser surface, why not just make a rinser that operates with a trigger?
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Glass rinser sanitation
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2022, 09:32:48 am »
Years ago at the HomeBrew Con in Philly I used a "communal" glass rinser. I was sick before the plane even landed back in Huntsville. Really, really sick -- like had to go to the Doc in the Box and get shots. I'll never use a communal rinser again.

Offline irajacobs

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Re: Glass rinser sanitation
« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2022, 06:18:50 pm »
Hmm...  The trigger idea has some possibilities.  Bypass the valve (make it always on - maybe remove the spring), then have a separate valve - like a ball valve or even a 12V solenoid valve with a button.  Might not be as fast as a quick press, but the rim would never have to touch the rinser.  Thanks.

Offline irajacobs

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Re: Glass rinser sanitation
« Reply #8 on: November 28, 2022, 03:47:20 pm »
It occurs to me that I have been using some bad assumptions.  Just because bars and beer festivals have some of the same trappings (crowds of people, multiple styles of beer, lots of glasses in use) that the use of glass rinsers at both places should be motivated by the same things.  NOT TRUE.  In a bar, there is NEVER any concern about residue from one beer affecting the next (or residue from one customer infecting the next), because each pour is into a separate, previously cleaned and sanitized glass – even for the same customer ordering another of the same beer.  The bar just wants to enhance the customer experience by cooling and wetting the glass with the glass rinser.

At a festival, there is also a desire to enhance the customer experience.  In this case by removing the residue from one beer before pouring the next.  The need for sanitation is ONLY because a problem was CREATED by connecting customers via common contact with the glass rinser (for those of you saying DUH!, you are right).  So the solution is to remove the contact (as was noted above about “triggers”).  It was a matter of seconds for me to remove the spring from the glass rinser.  Likewise for removing the star shaped activation ring (mine just unscrewed).  So now, the glass rinser valve is inactive, and the rinser is nothing more than a touchless up-facing spray head and a basin to catch and direct the rinse water.

A simple in-line ball valve can be used for turning it on and off, or Amazon sells a foot pedal valve for under $30.  Many other hand, foot, or DIY trigger projects exist.

Thanks to everyone for their input, and getting my head straight!

Offline irajacobs

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Re: Glass rinser sanitation
« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2022, 04:49:58 pm »
Here is the original design of a rinser for the 2023 Northern California Hombrewers Festival (NCHF  Theme = "Feelin Groovy"):
<img src="https://drive.google.com/uc?id=1gvS3GGIYEe1q_E_CkRz1hz6l7bpMBPV-" alt="Google Drive Image" />

And here is the revised design (showing a hand operated trigger valve)  The glass is held upside down over sprayer (or else everyone gets wet!)
<img src="https://drive.google.com/uc?id=1YE-PuvHfBDNJpPlayGL3aqaHbVgfNyOE " alt="Google Drive Image" />