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Author Topic: fermentation question  (Read 429 times)

Offline redrocker652002

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fermentation question
« on: November 19, 2022, 09:49:58 am »
My latest brew has been sitting in the closet at around 68 degrees for about a week. Since I seem to have found a nice way to keep my temps regulated I was thinking of maybe trying to jump the temp up for a week to see how the yeast reacts. It is a Pale Ale that will be dry hopped next week after two weeks in the bucket. I used US05 yeast and have kept it at a nice 68 to 69 degrees. My thought was maybe jumping it up to about 70 to see how that goes. I know I have read some recipes do that, but wondered if it is the right thing to do. Any input would be appreciated. RR

Offline tommymorris

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Re: fermentation question
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2022, 09:57:00 am »
My latest brew has been sitting in the closet at around 68 degrees for about a week. Since I seem to have found a nice way to keep my temps regulated I was thinking of maybe trying to jump the temp up for a week to see how the yeast reacts. It is a Pale Ale that will be dry hopped next week after two weeks in the bucket. I used US05 yeast and have kept it at a nice 68 to 69 degrees. My thought was maybe jumping it up to about 70 to see how that goes. I know I have read some recipes do that, but wondered if it is the right thing to do. Any input would be appreciated. RR
Fermentation is most likely complete or very near complete. Raising the temp now won’t do anything.

At 68F most yeasts work pretty fast. 

Offline redrocker652002

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Re: fermentation question
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2022, 10:01:07 am »
My latest brew has been sitting in the closet at around 68 degrees for about a week. Since I seem to have found a nice way to keep my temps regulated I was thinking of maybe trying to jump the temp up for a week to see how the yeast reacts. It is a Pale Ale that will be dry hopped next week after two weeks in the bucket. I used US05 yeast and have kept it at a nice 68 to 69 degrees. My thought was maybe jumping it up to about 70 to see how that goes. I know I have read some recipes do that, but wondered if it is the right thing to do. Any input would be appreciated. RR
Fermentation is most likely complete or very near complete. Raising the temp now won’t do anything.

At 68F most yeasts work pretty fast.

According to a website I read for US05 it says 14 days, but maybe I will take a gravity ready today and then early next week.  I want to add the ounce of Citra to the bucket and leave it for about 5 days and then get it in the keg to carb up.  This is the first one in a while that hit the numbers pretty square, so I am excited to give it a try. 

Offline denny

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Re: fermentation question
« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2022, 10:27:52 am »
The yeast won't notice a difference of 1 degree. You really can't even measure that small amount accurately.  If it was me, and fermentation was mostly done, I'd bump it to 72-75
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Offline KellerBrauer

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Re: fermentation question
« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2022, 11:43:12 am »
I have also wondered (and asked) about the effects of raising the fermentation temperature toward the end of fermentation, but never got any definitive answer.  So, I typically raise the temperature a few degrees at the end of fermentation to drive off any diacetyle.  But aside from that, I see no purpose in raising the temp, especially by only 1-2 degrees.
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Offline denny

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Re: fermentation question
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2022, 11:51:18 am »
I have also wondered (and asked) about the effects of raising the fermentation temperature toward the end of fermentation, but never got any definitive answer.  So, I typically raise the temperature a few degrees at the end of fermentation to drive off any diacetyle.  But aside from that, I see no purpose in raising the temp, especially by only 1-2 degrees.

I raise the temp to be sure fermentation is complete. In an ale there's seldom a need for a diacetyl rest. Since most esters and fusels are formed in the first 4-5 days, there's no problem raising the temp after that.
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Offline neuse

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Re: fermentation question
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2022, 08:58:00 am »
The Yeast book by White and Zainasheff advises to raise the temperature by 4 - 10 degrees F over one or two days after 2/3 to 3/4 of the fermentation has happened. This is to help achieve full attenuation and to clean up.

Offline redrocker652002

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Re: fermentation question
« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2022, 02:46:07 pm »
The yeast won't notice a difference of 1 degree. You really can't even measure that small amount accurately.  If it was me, and fermentation was mostly done, I'd bump it to 72-75

Thanks, but the problem is my bottled beer that has been sitting there for about two weeks probably would need to come out and find a space at room temp or below, right? 

Offline MNWayne

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Re: fermentation question
« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2022, 07:53:34 am »
Beer 2 weeks in the bottle can be moved to cool storage.
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Offline redrocker652002

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Re: fermentation question
« Reply #9 on: November 22, 2022, 09:18:20 am »
Beer 2 weeks in the bottle can be moved to cool storage.

Perfect.  I put them in a closet that is not quite as warm.  There are a few in the fridge waiting for this weekend to be consumed, so all is good.