Author Topic: PA Dutch  (Read 4556 times)

Offline MrNate

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PA Dutch
« on: September 28, 2010, 09:34:53 PM »
I try to keep tradition alive with my daughters, but I married a damn hippie. I converted them all to scrapple, but they still can't pronounce "syrup" right.

Anyway, if you haven't ever had PA Dutch cooking, make this: http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,1938,152162-254206,00.html

The parsley is optional. There are only 4 spices in PA Dutch country: Salt, pepper, flour, and milk.
“If one's actions are honest, one does not need the predated confidence of others, only their rational perception.”

Offline gordonstrong

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2010, 09:55:07 PM »
Forget about that, where's your scrapple recipe?  It's a little hard to find around here, but we can get goetta.  Similar.
Gordon Strong • Beavercreek, Ohio • AHA Member since 1997 • Twitter: GordonStrong

Offline MrNate

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2010, 10:01:46 PM »
I got nothing on that score. I looked through all the old church cookbooks and my grandma's recipe notes. I guess it was just one of those things everybody knew how to make. If I know Grammie it was cornmeal and anything left from the pig all run through the grinder.

17 different recipies for Chow Chow, though.
“If one's actions are honest, one does not need the predated confidence of others, only their rational perception.”

Offline euge

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2010, 10:14:35 PM »
Just another way to stretch out our porky friend. Scrapple and Goetta are similar to Boudin which however uses rice instead of buckwheat or oats.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline gordonstrong

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2010, 10:31:11 PM »
Is there something that uses buckwheat?  Scrapple uses cornmeal and goetta uses oats.  The thing I like about goetta is how crisp it fries up.  The crust on scrapple is thinner, and it's a bit more delicate to handle.  Goetta is more forgiving to cook, too.  Never had boudin; I'll have to look for it.
Gordon Strong • Beavercreek, Ohio • AHA Member since 1997 • Twitter: GordonStrong

Offline euge

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2010, 11:05:22 PM »
From wikipedia:

Quote
Scrapple, also known by the Pennsylvania Dutch name pon haus,[1][2] is traditionally a mush of pork scraps and trimmings combined with cornmeal and flour, often buckwheat flour, and spices.

But I just see a pack of it by the sausage locally. Never tried it but I will. Some say Boudin is an acquired taste or maybe too spicy. Far from the truth.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline MrNate

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2010, 05:57:22 AM »
Do you cook goetta and boudin the same way as scrapple?
“If one's actions are honest, one does not need the predated confidence of others, only their rational perception.”

Offline gordonstrong

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2010, 08:17:30 AM »
Slice it and fry it.  Goetta comes in a tube/roll like bulk sausage for patties, so you usually get them as round pieces looking like paler but crisper sausage patties.  Scrapple is usually in a block, so I guess it's more like fried cornmeal mush but with porky goodness.  The pieces are rectangular, usually.

I found one of the things to learn with scrapple is how to slice it so that it's still soft on the inside while the outside is crisp.  I remember ordering scrapple at a Baltimore restaurant when the NHC was there and getting something that was totally crisp, like a cracker.  Not nearly as good.  I'm guessing it's about 3/8" thick when sliced properly.  Too thick and it will fall apart when you try to flip it.
Gordon Strong • Beavercreek, Ohio • AHA Member since 1997 • Twitter: GordonStrong

Offline bluesman

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #8 on: September 29, 2010, 08:24:05 AM »
In 1926 two brothers from Bridgeville, Delaware founded the RAPA Scrapple manufacturing plant. The brothers were named Ralph Adams and Paul Adams.

The Original flavor of RAPA Scrapple has been around since the founding of the company. This famous recipe is moderately seasoned with a natural spice blend. It is cooked in cast iron kettles for the old-fashioned flavor that made RAPA famous!

Ingredients
Pork Stock, Pork Livers, Pork Fat, Pork Snouts, Corn Meal, Pork Hearts, Wheat Flour, Salt, Spices.

Back on topic:  I make a Potato Soup with Rivals recipe originally from Jeff Smith that is dyno-mite!
Love that stuff

 
Ron Price

Offline MrNate

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #9 on: September 29, 2010, 08:45:41 AM »
Slice it and fry it.  Goetta comes in a tube/roll like bulk sausage for patties, so you usually get them as round pieces looking like paler but crisper sausage patties.  Scrapple is usually in a block, so I guess it's more like fried cornmeal mush but with porky goodness.  The pieces are rectangular, usually.

I found one of the things to learn with scrapple is how to slice it so that it's still soft on the inside while the outside is crisp.  I remember ordering scrapple at a Baltimore restaurant when the NHC was there and getting something that was totally crisp, like a cracker.   Not nearly as good.  I'm guessing it's about 3/8" thick when sliced properly.  Too thick and it will fall apart when you try to flip it.

It wasn't the Bel-Loc diner, was it? And yeah, 3/8" sounds about right. I would've said 1/2", but I never measured my scrapple that carefully.
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Offline gordonstrong

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #10 on: September 29, 2010, 08:51:57 AM »
Dunno.  It was awhile ago.  Walking distance from the conference hotel, maybe 5-10 minutes.  Seemed like an old-fashioned kind of greasy spoon diner.  Would have expected better from a place with that kind of vibe, unless that's some kind of local way of eating it. 
Gordon Strong • Beavercreek, Ohio • AHA Member since 1997 • Twitter: GordonStrong

Offline MrNate

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #11 on: September 29, 2010, 09:37:02 AM »
Baltimore usually sucks for scrapple.
“If one's actions are honest, one does not need the predated confidence of others, only their rational perception.”

Offline euge

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #12 on: September 29, 2010, 11:04:55 AM »
Do you cook goetta and boudin the same way as scrapple?

Boudin is considered a sausage and presented in natural casings. I have seen it out of the casing. The sausages can be steamed, grilled, baked, smoked, and micro'd. I wouldn't boil it though. Don't know about Goetta, but looks and sounds similar to boudin.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline gordonstrong

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #13 on: September 29, 2010, 11:34:12 AM »
Goetta isn't like a link sausage; it doesn't have a casing.  I just checked out the wikipedia entry for it; looks fairly accurate.  The picture on the top is pretty much how you buy it.
Gordon Strong • Beavercreek, Ohio • AHA Member since 1997 • Twitter: GordonStrong

Offline hokerer

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #14 on: September 29, 2010, 11:36:26 AM »
17 different recipies for Chow Chow, though.

Yummm, Chow Chow.  Getting to be time to can up this season's batch.
Joe