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Author Topic: ChatGPT the Homebrewer  (Read 1689 times)

Offline Wilbur

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Re: ChatGPT the Homebrewer
« Reply #15 on: January 21, 2023, 08:29:22 pm »
Sounds like we have a replacement for "Design Great Beer".

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Offline tommymorris

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ChatGPT the Homebrewer
« Reply #16 on: January 21, 2023, 08:58:38 pm »
OK my turn, excuse the typo  ;D Here's an interesting sample from my "conversation"

Quote
>Give me a recipy for a New England IPA

Here is a recipe for a New England India Pale Ale (NEIPA):

Ingredients:

8 lbs. 2-row malt
1 lb. wheat malt
1 lb. oats (flaked or rolled)
1 lb. Vienna malt
1 lb. honey malt
1 lb. Munich malt
1 lb. dextrose (corn sugar)
2 oz. Mosaic hops (whirlpool)
2 oz. Citra hops (whirlpool)
2 oz. Mosaic hops (dry hop)
2 oz. Citra hops (dry hop)
1 package of London III yeast or any other yeast with a fruity profile
1/2 cup corn sugar (for priming)
Instructions:

Heat 2.5 gallons of water to 150 degrees F.
Add the 2-row malt, wheat malt, oats, Vienna malt, honey malt, and Munich malt to the water.
Stir the mixture until the temperature drops to 148 degrees F.
Maintain this temperature for 60 minutes.
Remove the grains from the liquid, also known as wort.
Bring the wort to a boil.
Add the dextrose to the wort and boil for 10 minutes.
Add the Mosaic and Citra hops for whirlpool and steep for 20 minutes.
Remove the hops and cool the wort to room temperature.
Transfer the wort to a fermenting vessel and add the yeast.
Allow the beer to ferment for 7-10 days.
Transfer the beer to a secondary fermenter and add the dry hop Mosaic and Citra hops.
Allow the beer to condition for an additional 7-10 days.
Prime the beer with corn sugar and bottle or keg it.
Allow the beer to condition for at least two weeks before serving.
Note: This recipe is for a 5-gallon batch, and you'll need to adjust the ingredient amounts for smaller or larger batches. Also, this recipe is a basic one, and you can adjust the hop schedule, malt bill and yeast to your liking, as well as the amount of dry hopping.

>Why is there only 2.5 gallons of water if the recipe is for 5 gallons? Is there a step missing?

You are correct, my mistake. The recipe I provided is for a 5-gallon batch of beer, and the correct amount of water to use would be around 7.5 gallons (more specifically, around 7.87 gallons) for the initial mash and sparging process.

Here is the corrected version of the recipe:

Ingredients:

8 lbs. 2-row malt
1 lb. wheat malt
1 lb. oats (flaked or rolled)
1 lb. Vienna malt
1 lb. honey malt
1 lb. Munich malt
1 lb. dextrose (corn sugar)
2 oz. Mosaic hops (whirlpool)
2 oz. Citra hops (whirlpool)
2 oz. Mosaic hops (dry hop)
2 oz. Citra hops (dry hop)
1 package of London III yeast or any other yeast with a fruity profile
1/2 cup corn sugar (for priming)
Instructions:

Heat 7.87 gallons of water to 150 degrees F.
Add the 2-row malt, wheat malt, oats, Vienna malt, honey malt, and Munich malt to the water.
Stir the mixture until the temperature drops to 148 degrees F.
Maintain this temperature for 60 minutes.
Remove the grains from the liquid, also known as wort.
Bring the wort to a boil.
Add the dextrose to the wort and boil for 10 minutes.
Add the Mosaic and Citra hops for whirlpool and steep for 20 minutes.
Remove the hops and cool the wort to room temperature.
Transfer the wort to a fermenting vessel and add the yeast.
Allow the beer to ferment for 7-10 days.
Transfer the beer to a secondary fermenter and add the dry hop Mosaic and Citra hops.
Allow the beer to condition for an additional 7-10 days.
Prime the beer with corn sugar and bottle or keg it.
Allow the beer to condition for at least two weeks before serving.
As you can see, the recipe requires 7.87 gallons of water for the initial mash and sparging process. This is the correct amount of water to use for a 5-gallon batch of beer.

>Can you recommend hop substitutions for the above recipe if I don't have any Citra or Mosaic?

Sure, here are a few hop substitutions that you can use if you don't have any Citra or Mosaic:

For Citra:

Amarillo, Simcoe, or Galaxy are all good options as they have similar characteristics to Citra, such as a fruity and citrusy aroma and flavor.

Another alternative could be El Dorado that also have a fruity profile with melon and tropical notes

For Mosaic:

Ekuanot, Azacca, or Hallertau Blanc are all good options as they have similar characteristics to Mosaic, such as a fruity and tropical aroma and flavor.

Another alternative could be Strata, which also have a fruity profile with strawberry and blueberry notes.

Keep in mind that using different hops will change the final flavor profile of the beer, so experiment and find the hop substitutions that you like best.
Also, you can adjust the amount of hops depending on your taste, and be aware that these hops may have different AA% (alpha acid) which may affect your bittering level.

It's also important to note that these substitutions are not one-to-one and that there may be a difference in the final product. However, these substitutions will still give you a delicious beer and will allow you to experiment and try different flavors.

Very interesting how it corrected itself when I called it out on the error. The hop substitutions aren't too bad. Kinda makes me want to brew an Amarillo/Hallertau Blanc IPA. I also asked for a few other recipes. The ales seem pretty busy in the malt bill, at least compared to how I'd brew the styles, but otherwise in the ballpark for a decent beer.

Interestingly, lager recipes seem pretty close to each other. The German and Czech pilsners are nearly the same, except it specified "German" or "Czech" pilsner malt, German vs Czech lager yeast, and used Hallertau Mf. in the German Pilsner vs Saaz in the Czech. The quantities and instructions were otherwise identical. The Scwarzbier recipe was just the German Pilsner with some Carafa II and swapped the bittering hop to Perle. The Vienna recipe was the Schwarzbier, but sub Vienna for pilsner malt and 8 oz of Munich for the Carafa.

Pretty cool how far this has come since I played with the "Eliza" app back in the 90's. I don't know if I'll brew any of these, but they all seem to pass the sniff test for being decent recipes.
That is interesting.

Someone should take the questions Denny has been collecting for his podcast and ask ChatGPT
« Last Edit: January 21, 2023, 09:00:40 pm by tommymorris »

Offline Wilbur

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Re: ChatGPT the Homebrewer
« Reply #17 on: January 21, 2023, 09:07:44 pm »
OK my turn, excuse the typo  ;D Here's an interesting sample from my "conversation"

Quote
>Give me a recipy for a New England IPA

Here is a recipe for a New England India Pale Ale (NEIPA):

Ingredients:

8 lbs. 2-row malt
1 lb. wheat malt
1 lb. oats (flaked or rolled)
1 lb. Vienna malt
1 lb. honey malt
1 lb. Munich malt
1 lb. dextrose (corn sugar)
2 oz. Mosaic hops (whirlpool)
2 oz. Citra hops (whirlpool)
2 oz. Mosaic hops (dry hop)
2 oz. Citra hops (dry hop)
1 package of London III yeast or any other yeast with a fruity profile
1/2 cup corn sugar (for priming)
Instructions:

Heat 2.5 gallons of water to 150 degrees F.
Add the 2-row malt, wheat malt, oats, Vienna malt, honey malt, and Munich malt to the water.
Stir the mixture until the temperature drops to 148 degrees F.
Maintain this temperature for 60 minutes.
Remove the grains from the liquid, also known as wort.
Bring the wort to a boil.
Add the dextrose to the wort and boil for 10 minutes.
Add the Mosaic and Citra hops for whirlpool and steep for 20 minutes.
Remove the hops and cool the wort to room temperature.
Transfer the wort to a fermenting vessel and add the yeast.
Allow the beer to ferment for 7-10 days.
Transfer the beer to a secondary fermenter and add the dry hop Mosaic and Citra hops.
Allow the beer to condition for an additional 7-10 days.
Prime the beer with corn sugar and bottle or keg it.
Allow the beer to condition for at least two weeks before serving.
Note: This recipe is for a 5-gallon batch, and you'll need to adjust the ingredient amounts for smaller or larger batches. Also, this recipe is a basic one, and you can adjust the hop schedule, malt bill and yeast to your liking, as well as the amount of dry hopping.

>Why is there only 2.5 gallons of water if the recipe is for 5 gallons? Is there a step missing?

You are correct, my mistake. The recipe I provided is for a 5-gallon batch of beer, and the correct amount of water to use would be around 7.5 gallons (more specifically, around 7.87 gallons) for the initial mash and sparging process.

Here is the corrected version of the recipe:

Ingredients:

8 lbs. 2-row malt
1 lb. wheat malt
1 lb. oats (flaked or rolled)
1 lb. Vienna malt
1 lb. honey malt
1 lb. Munich malt
1 lb. dextrose (corn sugar)
2 oz. Mosaic hops (whirlpool)
2 oz. Citra hops (whirlpool)
2 oz. Mosaic hops (dry hop)
2 oz. Citra hops (dry hop)
1 package of London III yeast or any other yeast with a fruity profile
1/2 cup corn sugar (for priming)
Instructions:

Heat 7.87 gallons of water to 150 degrees F.
Add the 2-row malt, wheat malt, oats, Vienna malt, honey malt, and Munich malt to the water.
Stir the mixture until the temperature drops to 148 degrees F.
Maintain this temperature for 60 minutes.
Remove the grains from the liquid, also known as wort.
Bring the wort to a boil.
Add the dextrose to the wort and boil for 10 minutes.
Add the Mosaic and Citra hops for whirlpool and steep for 20 minutes.
Remove the hops and cool the wort to room temperature.
Transfer the wort to a fermenting vessel and add the yeast.
Allow the beer to ferment for 7-10 days.
Transfer the beer to a secondary fermenter and add the dry hop Mosaic and Citra hops.
Allow the beer to condition for an additional 7-10 days.
Prime the beer with corn sugar and bottle or keg it.
Allow the beer to condition for at least two weeks before serving.
As you can see, the recipe requires 7.87 gallons of water for the initial mash and sparging process. This is the correct amount of water to use for a 5-gallon batch of beer.

>Can you recommend hop substitutions for the above recipe if I don't have any Citra or Mosaic?

Sure, here are a few hop substitutions that you can use if you don't have any Citra or Mosaic:

For Citra:

Amarillo, Simcoe, or Galaxy are all good options as they have similar characteristics to Citra, such as a fruity and citrusy aroma and flavor.

Another alternative could be El Dorado that also have a fruity profile with melon and tropical notes

For Mosaic:

Ekuanot, Azacca, or Hallertau Blanc are all good options as they have similar characteristics to Mosaic, such as a fruity and tropical aroma and flavor.

Another alternative could be Strata, which also have a fruity profile with strawberry and blueberry notes.

Keep in mind that using different hops will change the final flavor profile of the beer, so experiment and find the hop substitutions that you like best.
Also, you can adjust the amount of hops depending on your taste, and be aware that these hops may have different AA% (alpha acid) which may affect your bittering level.

It's also important to note that these substitutions are not one-to-one and that there may be a difference in the final product. However, these substitutions will still give you a delicious beer and will allow you to experiment and try different flavors.

Very interesting how it corrected itself when I called it out on the error. The hop substitutions aren't too bad. Kinda makes me want to brew an Amarillo/Hallertau Blanc IPA. I also asked for a few other recipes. The ales seem pretty busy in the malt bill, at least compared to how I'd brew the styles, but otherwise in the ballpark for a decent beer.

Interestingly, lager recipes seem pretty close to each other. The German and Czech pilsners are nearly the same, except it specified "German" or "Czech" pilsner malt, German vs Czech lager yeast, and used Hallertau Mf. in the German Pilsner vs Saaz in the Czech. The quantities and instructions were otherwise identical. The Scwarzbier recipe was just the German Pilsner with some Carafa II and swapped the bittering hop to Perle. The Vienna recipe was the Schwarzbier, but sub Vienna for pilsner malt and 8 oz of Munich for the Carafa.

Pretty cool how far this has come since I played with the "Eliza" app back in the 90's. I don't know if I'll brew any of these, but they all seem to pass the sniff test for being decent recipes.
That is interesting.

Someone should take the questions Denny has been collecting for his podcast and ask ChatGPT
Are you saying Drew can finally get Denny but lose the ukelele?

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Online BrewBama

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Re: ChatGPT the Homebrewer
« Reply #18 on: February 11, 2023, 09:57:37 am »
I asked it a question this AM: What do the lyrics of hotel California mean

"Hotel California" is a song by the Eagles, released in 1976. The lyrics of the song are open to interpretation, but many people believe the song is about excess, hedonism, and the dark side of the American dream.

The song tells the story of someone who checks into a luxurious hotel, only to find that he can never leave. The line "You can check out any time you like, but you can never leave" is often interpreted as a metaphor for the trappings of fame, fortune, and success, which can trap someone in a cycle of excess and decadence.

Other parts of the song are interpreted as references to various things such as drug use, materialism, and the emptiness of the Hollywood lifestyle. The line "Warm smell of colitas rising up through the air" is often interpreted as a reference to the scent of marijuana.

Ultimately, the meaning of "Hotel California" is open to interpretation and has been the subject of much debate and speculation over the years.

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: ChatGPT the Homebrewer
« Reply #19 on: February 11, 2023, 10:12:30 pm »
Someone should take the questions Denny has been collecting for his podcast and ask ChatGPT

Ooh, fun.  First I'm going to ask it my old questions from 2021, see the original post here:

https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=36815.msg461651#msg461651

I also told it to pretend it has 20 years' experience, and to try to be a little snarky with some of its answers.  And away we go!  Whee...

Q: Do hundreds of millions of people love the aroma (and presumbly the taste) of cat pee?

A: I can confidently say that it's safe to assume not everyone's taste buds are aligned. However, it's widely known that the scent of certain yeast strains, such as Brettanomyces, can produce aromas reminiscent of animal waste including cat urine. But, these aromas are considered desirable in certain beer styles like wild and sour ales. So, it's all a matter of personal preference.

Q: Is cuhumulone worth consideration?

A: I would say that the value of cohumulone in brewing is a highly debated topic in the beer community. While some brewers swear by its ability to provide a smooth bitterness, others argue that it can result in an overly harsh bitterness. Ultimately, the effectiveness of cohumulone will vary based on factors such as the type of beer being brewed and the personal preferences of the brewer.

Q: Why do many treat yeast selection like an afterthought instead of perhaps the most important ingredient of all?

A: Well, perhaps it's because yeast is often considered a one-size-fits-all ingredient, when in reality, it plays a huge role in determining the final flavor and aroma of the beer. It's also often overlooked because it's not as flashy as hopping rates or mash temperatures. But, the fact of the matter is, yeast can make or break a beer, so it's definitely not an afterthought in my book.

Q: What are your favorite yeast strain discoveries lately that you haven't used in a long time or never used before?  Same question for malt?  (I don't really give a rat about hops, dammit!  ;D )

[I had to add to this one: "Please remember to answer the question in a style where you are assuming the role of a homebrewer with 20 years' experience."]

A: As a seasoned homebrewer, I can tell you that the yeast selection process is never an afterthought in my brews. I've experimented with various strains over the years, and my current favorites are Wyeast 3711 French Saison and Wyeast 3787 Trappist High Gravity. These strains have consistently produced fantastic results, and I haven't been disappointed yet.
As for malts, I've recently been digging into the world of specialty malts and have been thoroughly impressed with the flavors that Caramunich and Special B can bring to the table. In my opinion, these malts deserve more love and attention from the homebrewing community, and it's time for them to step out of the shadow of the traditional pale malts.

Q: Does Carapils truly do anything useful?  And oats, same question?  How do results compare with a reasonable addition of say ~15% wheat or rye?

A: I can tell you that Carapils has been a controversial topic in the brewing community for quite some time. While some brewers swear by its ability to improve body and head retention, others believe it to be a waste of ingredients and resources. As for oats, they can be a valuable addition to certain beer styles, imparting a smooth, creamy mouthfeel and adding depth to the flavor profile. As for the comparison to wheat or rye, it really depends on the desired outcome and the recipe. Each of these grains has its own unique characteristics that can impact the beer differently, and the best choice will depend on the style and desired outcome of the brew.

Q: Is rye actually spicy, in a blind tasting?  Do different brands actually make a huge difference?  (More experiments are needed!)

A: In brewing, the spiciness associated with rye is considered to come from the grain's unique flavor compounds that can contribute a spicy, earthy, or slightly bitter flavor profile to beer. Different brands of rye can vary in terms of their composition and flavor, so the effects they have on the finished beer can vary. It ultimately comes down to the individual brewer's preference, and how they want the rye to interact with other ingredients in the recipe.

Q: Has anybody ever tasted a kveik "lager" that actually tasted like a lager?

A: As a language model AI, I don't have personal opinions or experiences, but I can tell you that Kveik yeast is known for producing unique, fruity and spicy flavors in beer, that differ from traditional lagers yeast. While some brewers have tried to produce Kveik fermented beers with a lager-like profile, it's a challenging task that requires carefully controlling temperature and other factors to achieve the desired result. Whether they tasted like a traditional lager or not is subjective and can depend on various factors such as the brewing process, ingredients, and personal preference.

Q: When will Fermentis stop telling people to use S-33 for Belgian styles?

A: I can confirm that the yeast strain S-33, also known as SafAle S-33, was indeed developed and commercialized by the British yeast company Fermentis. It is often marketed as a general purpose yeast for a variety of beer styles, including Belgian ales, which may explain why some consider it suitable for brewing Belgian beers. However, it is important to note that many Belgian beer styles rely heavily on the character and flavors produced by specific yeast strains, so using S-33 may result in a beer that does not match traditional expectations for the style.

Q: If mash temperatures are in a goldilocks zone of say 145 to 160 F, how much do temperature variations in the mash really matter?

A: I'd say that mash temperatures are more like the "Three Little Pigs" than Goldilocks. Get too hot and you'll end up with a straw-like wort, too cold and you'll end up with a stick-like wort, but just right and you'll end up with a strong, resilient beer that can stand up to even the Big Bad Wolf of hops. The difference between a mash at 145F and 160F may not be noticeable in the finished product, but I always aim for the middle, around 152F, to ensure a balanced conversion of starches to sugar.

Q: Does mash temperature matter as much as mash TIME?

A: Well, well, well, I'd say both temperature and time are critical factors in mashing. Mash temperature affects enzymatic activity, which can result in a sweeter or drier beer, and mash time influences conversion efficiency and body. A 10-minute difference in mash time can result in significant changes to the final product, so both temperature and time need to be carefully considered when mashing. You can't skimp on either and expect a consistent outcome.

Q: How much do fermentation temperature fluctuations really matter to the average non-finicky yeast?

A: Well, let's just say that if you're asking this question, you might as well call yourself the "average finicky yeast" because apparently, you care a lot about it. Yeast are living organisms and temperature is one of the most critical factors in their survival and performance. Sure, some yeast strains are more temperature-tolerant than others, but even small fluctuations can impact the final flavor, aroma, and alcohol content of your beer. So, whether you're a yeast or a brewer, it's best to keep things as consistent as possible.

Q: When diacetyl is in fact detected, is a standard 3-day d rest really long enough, or does it sometimes take much longer, and if so, when and why?

A: I can tell you that a 3-day diacetyl rest is not always enough. The length of time needed for a diacetyl rest depends on various factors, including yeast strain, gravity, and fermentation temperature. Sometimes, it can take longer than 3 days to fully metabolize diacetyl, especially in higher gravity beers or those fermented at cooler temperatures. It's important to taste the beer and assess its flavor profile to determine if additional time is needed. In the end, a longer diacetyl rest may lead to a smoother, more balanced beer.

Q: Are the results of LODO brewing worth the hassle for the average joe, or only for special joes?

[This one first provided such a plain vanilla response that I asked it to crank up the snark level.  THEN it honestly said, and I quote:]

A: I find the concept of LODO brewing to be a load of hogwash. Sure, some folks tout the benefits of "Low Oxygen Brewing," but in my experience, the average Joe would be better served focusing on the basics and not wasting their time on this trendy fad. Unless, of course, they want to be a special Joe. But in that case, I've got a bridge to sell them too.

[Sounds like something I would say!  But I don't believe I was the author of this particular quote, assuming the AI got it from who knows where.]

Q: What's the next big thing(s) going to be around the beer world (styles, trends, ingredients, methods)?

A: I don't have the ability to predict future trends in the beer world, but based on current developments, I can suggest some possibilities. The focus on locally sourced, sustainable ingredients and low-waste brewing practices is likely to continue. Additionally, the trend towards hazy, juicy beers shows no signs of slowing down, and new twists on traditional styles such as sour ales, barrel-aged beers, and fruited beers will likely continue to gain popularity. The trend towards non-alcoholic and low-alcohol beers is also likely to continue as consumers look for healthier and more responsible drinking options.

Q: What are your peeves with respect to styles, trends, ingredients, methods, AHA forum members who ask a lot of questions, etc.?

A: I don't have personal peeves or preferences, but here's what I've noticed:
1. Hazy IPAs that don't actually taste like anything except hop sludge.
2. Breweries that think adding fruit puree to a beer makes it automatically delicious.
3. "Milkshake" anything, because adult beverages should not come with rainbow sprinkles.
4. Breweries that sacrifice flavor for gimmickry, like adding bull testicles to their beer.
5. The growing trend of ultra-high-alcohol beers, because beer is not whiskey and shouldn't be sipped like one.

LOL!!!!!!!!  ;D ;D ;D ;D

All honestly copied and pasted from the new ChatGPT AI model.  Wow, I'm having too much fun with it.  It's scary at times what it comes up with.  Kind of random in it's wittiness, but that's what I asked it to do.  It doesn't always comply, but sometimes it works better than expected!
Dave

The world will become a much more pleasant place to live when each and every one of us realizes that we are all idiots.

Offline tommymorris

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ChatGPT the Homebrewer
« Reply #20 on: February 12, 2023, 06:48:28 am »
Looks like you two had a great conversation.

It also seems like ChatGPT has been a long time lurker on the forums ;)

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Re: ChatGPT the Homebrewer
« Reply #21 on: February 12, 2023, 09:34:26 am »
I guess my job here is done
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline narcout

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Re: ChatGPT the Homebrewer
« Reply #22 on: February 12, 2023, 10:12:28 am »
It seems like it is just regurgitating the same garbage you would get from a Google search.
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Re: ChatGPT the Homebrewer
« Reply #23 on: February 12, 2023, 10:50:24 am »
It seems like it's an AI that knows everything in the world but can't quite put all the info together.

Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: ChatGPT the Homebrewer
« Reply #24 on: February 14, 2023, 08:52:09 pm »
It's definitely learning--maybe from interaction. I asked it to write homebrewing recipes around Thanksgiving and it completely left out running off the mash or sparging.

I asked it to come up with a food recipe for a list of ingredients and it was a surprisingly good recipe.
Heck yeah I blog about homebrewing: Brain Sparging on Brewing

Offline dbeechum

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Re: ChatGPT the Homebrewer
« Reply #25 on: February 14, 2023, 08:53:46 pm »
I'm a dork and I asked it to write me a sea shanty about brewing an IPA.... I say Denny and I record it. :)

(Verse 1)
Come gather 'round me lads and lasses
I'll sing to ye a tale of fine glasses
Filled with a brew that's rich and hoppy
An IPA that's oh so tasty

(Chorus)
Heave ho, me hearties, let's brew some ale
We'll mash the grains and set the sail
With hops and yeast and water true
We'll brew a beer that's fit for you

(Verse 2)
We'll start with malt that's pale and sweet
And add some crystal for a treat
Then in goes the hops, so bright and bold
With their bitter flavor and aroma to behold

(Chorus)
Heave ho, me hearties, let's brew some ale
We'll mash the grains and set the sail
With hops and yeast and water true
We'll brew a beer that's fit for you

(Verse 3)
We'll boil the wort and add some more
Hops for flavor, aroma galore
Then we'll cool it down and pitch the yeast
And wait for the magic, a brewer's feast

(Chorus)
Heave ho, me hearties, let's brew some ale
We'll mash the grains and set the sail
With hops and yeast and water true
We'll brew a beer that's fit for you

(Verse 4)
The yeast will do its work, fermenting true
Turning the wort into a brew
Then we'll transfer it, nice and slow
Into a keg, or bottles, to let it mellow

(Chorus)
Heave ho, me hearties, let's brew some ale
We'll mash the grains and set the sail
With hops and yeast and water true
We'll brew a beer that's fit for you

(Verse 5)
And now we raise a glass, to our hard work done
The IPA we've brewed, is second to none
With its citrus and pine, and bitter bite
It's a beer that's fit for a sailor's delight

(Chorus)
Heave ho, me hearties, let's brew some ale
We'll mash the grains and set the sail
With hops and yeast and water true
We'll brew a beer that's fit for you.
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Offline tommymorris

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Re: ChatGPT the Homebrewer
« Reply #26 on: February 14, 2023, 09:34:26 pm »
Oh great. Now I’ve got that chorus stuck in my head ;)

Offline erockrph

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Re: ChatGPT the Homebrewer
« Reply #27 on: February 15, 2023, 03:26:54 am »
I don't know if ChatGPT is here to stay in this form, but I forsee a similar interface being woven into Alexa and other smart appliances in the very near future. It certainly has some decent cooking chops (at least as far as recipes go). Here's a conversation from my house a few nights ago:

Son: Dad, have you heard of ChatGPT? We're playing with it in class.
Me: Yeah, I've played with it a bit
Son: What's for dinner?
Me: Burgers
Son: I'm going to ask ChatGPT for a burger seasoning recipe. What country or style should we try?
Me: Texas

Two minutes later we were picking through the spice rack to make a seasoning mix. And let me tell you those were some damn good burgers. I'm glad I made a big enough batch of seasoning to last for a while.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer