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Author Topic: Fermentation Lag  (Read 690 times)

Offline BuffaloBill

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Fermentation Lag
« on: January 29, 2023, 03:49:47 pm »
At what point do you start to get concerned about fermentation beginning?  I took part in a fund raiser that provided 5 gallons of wort from a local micro brewery for your contribution.  All you have to do is add yeast or whatever else you want to put in.  It is a brown ale, OG 1.0568.  The beer came out of the tank at 65 degrees and I pitched one packet of Safale 05 as soon as I got home after a very short ride.  24 hours later, there appears to be no activity.  I've never had this happen before.  Is the best course of action adding another packet of yeast?  If so, at what point?  I know this is probably a rookie question, but any input would be appreciated. 

Offline Bob357

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Re: Fermentation Lag
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2023, 04:36:16 pm »
With US-05 at 65 degrees, I wouldn't consider 24 hrs. excessive. I'd give it another 12 to 24 hrs. before even thinking about worrying. Airlock activity isn't a good indication of fermentation. If you're fermenting in a bucket or anything else that you can't see through, you might want to carefully take a peek in another 12 or so hours.
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Offline neuse

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Re: Fermentation Lag
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2023, 08:15:22 am »
You can check for kraeusen in a bucket without lifting the lid. Darken the room and set a flashlight on the lid aiming down. You can see where the level is through the side of the bucket. But sometimes it's hard to tell kraeusen level from liquid level, so then you would have to know where the liquid level was to start with.

Offline denny

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Re: Fermentation Lag
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2023, 08:20:11 am »
I don't worry until it gets to 72 hours.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline tommymorris

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Re: Fermentation Lag
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2023, 08:28:11 am »
You can check for kraeusen in a bucket without lifting the lid. Darken the room and set a flashlight on the lid aiming down. You can see where the level is through the side of the bucket. But sometimes it's hard to tell kraeusen level from liquid level, so then you would have to know where the liquid level was to start with.
I just open the lid.

Offline BuffaloBill

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Re: Fermentation Lag
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2023, 08:34:04 am »
With US-05 at 65 degrees, I wouldn't consider 24 hrs. excessive. I'd give it another 12 to 24 hrs. before even thinking about worrying. Airlock activity isn't a good indication of fermentation. If you're fermenting in a bucket or anything else that you can't see through, you might want to carefully take a peek in another 12 or so hours.

Sometime between 30 and 36 hours things took off.  I just waited.  Never looked inside the bucket.  Thanks for the comments.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2023, 08:36:20 am by BuffaloBill »

Offline BrewBama

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Re: Fermentation Lag
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2023, 09:13:24 am »
I’ve had Bry-97 lag 36 hrs before then took off like a rocket ship. Glad it worked out for you.

Online ynotbrusum

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Re: Fermentation Lag
« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2023, 12:56:40 pm »
Glad it worked out for you.  Here is an interesting observation I have seen - oftenasluggish start is followed by a just as quick time to total ferment as it would have been with a quick and sready ferment cycle.  Not always, but frequently the case.  Cheers.
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"

Offline denny

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Re: Fermentation Lag
« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2023, 01:26:15 pm »
Glad it worked out for you.  Here is an interesting observation I have seen - oftenasluggish start is followed by a just as quick time to total ferment as it would have been with a quick and sready ferment cycle.  Not always, but frequently the case.  Cheers.

I have discovered the same, which is why I urge people not to worry about longer lags.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell