Author Topic: English yeast...Fruitiness wanted  (Read 1664 times)

Offline roguejim

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English yeast...Fruitiness wanted
« on: September 30, 2010, 12:16:18 PM »
I would like to brew a bitter with a bit of fruitiness.

1) Does SO-4 provide any fruitiness?

2) What strain would be my best choice here?

3) Is there any part of the brewing/fermentation process which can be manipulated to produce more or less fruitiness?

A few years ago, I used WY1275(Thames Valley), which produced some nice fruitiness.  But, I was not able to repeat it.

Offline euge

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Re: English yeast...Fruitiness wanted
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2010, 12:17:45 PM »
I like Windsor dry yeast.
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Offline tumarkin

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Re: English yeast...Fruitiness wanted
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2010, 12:31:30 PM »
Windsor is a good choice. As far as brewing techniques, fruitiness is a result of esters thrown by the yeast. Some strains produce more (or less) than others, but whichever yeast you go with you want to ferment at a little bit higher temperature to encourage the fruitiness. Not too high, or you're likely to get fusels & nasty higher alcohols. Check the yeast vendors website to get their recommend temp range. Stay within the higher middle of that range.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: English yeast...Fruitiness wanted
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2010, 02:03:24 PM »
I like to use White Labs WLP002 yeast for my English Ales.  Produces a fair amount of fruitiness and flocculates well.  Pitch at 64F and slowly raise to 68F to get a relatively higher level of fruitiness.
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Offline dhacker

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Re: English yeast...Fruitiness wanted
« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2010, 05:39:15 PM »
I would like to brew a bitter with a bit of fruitiness.

1) Does SO-4 provide any fruitiness?


Yes . . it does. But, don't know how much you are shooting for. It's not the fruitiest English strain, but definitely some.
Just brew it...

Offline amish electrician

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Re: English yeast...Fruitiness wanted
« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2010, 09:14:54 PM »
I like to use White Labs WLP002 yeast for my English Ales.  Produces a fair amount of fruitiness and flocculates well.  Pitch at 64F and slowly raise to 68F to get a relatively higher level of fruitiness.

+1 I really like the fruitiness 002 gives off when you raise the temp like that.

Offline roguejim

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Re: English yeast...Fruitiness wanted
« Reply #6 on: October 01, 2010, 02:44:06 AM »
In your understanding, do esters refer to flavor, or aroma?  Both?

Offline bluesman

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Re: English yeast...Fruitiness wanted
« Reply #7 on: October 01, 2010, 03:32:47 AM »
In your understanding, do esters refer to flavor, or aroma?  Both?

Esters can be detected in flavor and aroma.  Almost always fruity in nature.
Ron Price

Offline denny

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Re: English yeast...Fruitiness wanted
« Reply #8 on: October 01, 2010, 09:00:05 AM »
Jim asked me this question offline and I said that usually I was talking about flavor, but that it might also be appropriate to refer to esters in aroma.  We've heard from Ron now....what about some more opinions?
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Offline roguejim

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Re: English yeast...Fruitiness wanted
« Reply #9 on: October 01, 2010, 11:39:26 AM »
Okay...

I'm looking over this BJCP scoresheet of mine for an APA.  The judge (Grand Master III level) uses the term "ester" to refer to aspects of both the aroma, and flavor.  Aroma-low peach ester.  Flavor- light white grape ester in finish.

Offline tumarkin

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Re: English yeast...Fruitiness wanted
« Reply #10 on: October 01, 2010, 12:53:44 PM »
Jim asked me this question offline and I said that usually I was talking about flavor, but that it might also be appropriate to refer to esters in aroma.  We've heard from Ron now....what about some more opinions?

no question - esters can be detected by both the nose & the tastebuds. look at the BJCP style guidelines and you'll see many of the stle descriptions refer to esters in both aroma & flavor
Mark Tumarkin
Hogtown Brewers
Gainesville, FL

Offline mabrungard

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Re: English yeast...Fruitiness wanted
« Reply #11 on: October 01, 2010, 08:15:03 PM »
The production of esters can be affected by both the fermentation temperature and by the yeast pitching rate.  Pitching too little yeast encourages more yeast growth and ester production.  This is very desirable in Hefeweizens.  Overpitching reduces the yeast growth and ester production. 
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Offline redbeerman

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Re: English yeast...Fruitiness wanted
« Reply #12 on: October 02, 2010, 05:45:24 AM »
I'm with Ron on this one.  Both aroma and taste can pick up esters in beer.  Esters are used in the manufacture of artificial flavorings as well.  FWIW.  I like WLP-002 for English beers.  Although S-04 is OK in a pinch.

Here is an interesting link about the subject. (for beer nerds) ;)

http://getcheminfo.wikispaces.com/abilinski
« Last Edit: October 02, 2010, 05:57:40 AM by redbeerman »
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Offline bluesman

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Re: English yeast...Fruitiness wanted
« Reply #13 on: October 02, 2010, 08:13:12 AM »
I'm with Ron on this one.  Both aroma and taste can pick up esters in beer.  Esters are used in the manufacture of artificial flavorings as well.  FWIW.  I like WLP-002 for English beers.  Although S-04 is OK in a pinch.

Here is an interesting link about the subject. (for beer nerds) ;)

http://getcheminfo.wikispaces.com/abilinski

Nice find Jim!  I like it.  :)
Ron Price

Offline denny

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Re: English yeast...Fruitiness wanted
« Reply #14 on: October 02, 2010, 08:44:51 AM »
The production of esters can be affected by both the fermentation temperature and by the yeast pitching rate.  Pitching too little yeast encourages more yeast growth and ester production.  This is very desirable in Hefeweizens.  Overpitching reduces the yeast growth and ester production. 

Martin, I've also read things that indicate the opposite, i.e. yeast growth leads to decreased ester production. If you have time, I'd appreciate your take on this..

http://www.danstaryeast.com/library/yeast-growth
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