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Author Topic: Kellerbier is very murky, and a lot of sulfur aroma  (Read 767 times)

Offline PiracyBrewing

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Kellerbier is very murky, and a lot of sulfur aroma
« on: April 19, 2023, 07:34:33 am »
So I finally got around to brewing my first lager, a kellerbier since it would be the most forgiving with clarity since it meant to have haze to it. I used Wyeast 2206 as the yeast strain with a 1 liter starter. Fermented at 50 degrees for the first five days then ramped it to 55 for two days 62 for a day and now at 66 for a day. I took a gravity reading yesterday and its still very cloudy/murky and there is a sulfur aroma on the nose. It taste great and I'm not really concerned sulfur aroma since its a lager strain and I know it will gas out. But it being so murky like is what's concerning me. Looks almost like a giant yeast starter. I mashed only for 45 minutes and got my conversion I needed and I did not use a whirlfloc tablet since clarity wasn't important for the style. I did a 60 minute boil. So two questions,

Has anyone brewed a kellerbier or a lager and ran into this?
And will cold crashing drop most of the yeast out of suspension?

I have gelatin fining if it comes to using that I will but I'm trying not to.

Online dannyjed

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Re: Kellerbier is very murky, and a lot of sulfur aroma
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2023, 08:19:52 am »
Try cold crashing.


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Offline PiracyBrewing

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Re: Kellerbier is very murky, and a lot of sulfur aroma
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2023, 08:59:06 am »
I will try that after todays temp ramp and see what happens.

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Kellerbier is very murky, and a lot of sulfur aroma
« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2023, 10:25:52 am »
I wouldn't crash it yet.  I'd just try to be patient and leave it for another ~3 days, I'll bet it will begin to clear significantly in that time.  If you crash it too early, you *might* end up with diacetyl, and lock in the sulfur instead of getting rid of it.  Keeping it warm for a few more days allows the yeast to clean up after itself a bit before it all settles out.
Dave

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Offline PiracyBrewing

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Re: Kellerbier is very murky, and a lot of sulfur aroma
« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2023, 10:36:45 am »
I wouldn't crash it yet.  I'd just try to be patient and leave it for another ~3 days, I'll bet it will begin to clear significantly in that time.  If you crash it too early, you *might* end up with diacetyl, and lock in the sulfur instead of getting rid of it.  Keeping it warm for a few more days allows the yeast to clean up after itself a bit before it all settles out.
That makes sense, I stuck my gravity sample in the freezer to see if any of the yeast would drop. But when I tasted it you got the sulfur taste instead of just aroma, where it tasted fine before I stuck it in the freezer. Thanks for the advice. Do you think 66 is the highest I should go on the temp ramp?

Offline denny

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Re: Kellerbier is very murky, and a lot of sulfur aroma
« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2023, 11:00:30 am »
I wouldn't crash it yet.  I'd just try to be patient and leave it for another ~3 days, I'll bet it will begin to clear significantly in that time.  If you crash it too early, you *might* end up with diacetyl, and lock in the sulfur instead of getting rid of it.  Keeping it warm for a few more days allows the yeast to clean up after itself a bit before it all settles out.
That makes sense, I stuck my gravity sample in the freezer to see if any of the yeast would drop. But when I tasted it you got the sulfur taste instead of just aroma, where it tasted fine before I stuck it in the freezer. Thanks for the advice. Do you think 66 is the highest I should go on the temp ramp?

The exact temp doesn't really matter. All you're trying to do is make the yeast more active. I typically do d rests in the low 70s.
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Kellerbier is very murky, and a lot of sulfur aroma
« Reply #6 on: April 19, 2023, 12:32:54 pm »
I wouldn't crash it yet.  I'd just try to be patient and leave it for another ~3 days, I'll bet it will begin to clear significantly in that time.  If you crash it too early, you *might* end up with diacetyl, and lock in the sulfur instead of getting rid of it.  Keeping it warm for a few more days allows the yeast to clean up after itself a bit before it all settles out.
That makes sense, I stuck my gravity sample in the freezer to see if any of the yeast would drop. But when I tasted it you got the sulfur taste instead of just aroma, where it tasted fine before I stuck it in the freezer. Thanks for the advice. Do you think 66 is the highest I should go on the temp ramp?

The exact temp doesn't really matter. All you're trying to do is make the yeast more active. I typically do d rests in the low 70s.

+1  Anything "not cold" is just fine.
Dave

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Offline PiracyBrewing

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Re: Kellerbier is very murky, and a lot of sulfur aroma
« Reply #7 on: April 19, 2023, 12:50:39 pm »
I wouldn't crash it yet.  I'd just try to be patient and leave it for another ~3 days, I'll bet it will begin to clear significantly in that time.  If you crash it too early, you *might* end up with diacetyl, and lock in the sulfur instead of getting rid of it.  Keeping it warm for a few more days allows the yeast to clean up after itself a bit before it all settles out.
That makes sense, I stuck my gravity sample in the freezer to see if any of the yeast would drop. But when I tasted it you got the sulfur taste instead of just aroma, where it tasted fine before I stuck it in the freezer. Thanks for the advice. Do you think 66 is the highest I should go on the temp ramp?

The exact temp doesn't really matter. All you're trying to do is make the yeast more active. I typically do d rests in the low 70s.

+1  Anything "not cold" is just fine.

Thanks for the advice! I will just leave it alone for a few days.

Offline chinaski

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Re: Kellerbier is very murky, and a lot of sulfur aroma
« Reply #8 on: April 21, 2023, 04:27:24 pm »
I wouldn't crash it yet.  I'd just try to be patient and leave it for another ~3 days, I'll bet it will begin to clear significantly in that time.  If you crash it too early, you *might* end up with diacetyl, and lock in the sulfur instead of getting rid of it.  Keeping it warm for a few more days allows the yeast to clean up after itself a bit before it all settles out.
That makes sense, I stuck my gravity sample in the freezer to see if any of the yeast would drop. But when I tasted it you got the sulfur taste instead of just aroma, where it tasted fine before I stuck it in the freezer. Thanks for the advice. Do you think 66 is the highest I should go on the temp ramp?

The exact temp doesn't really matter. All you're trying to do is make the yeast more active. I typically do d rests in the low 70s.

+1  Anything "not cold" is just fine.

Thanks for the advice! I will just leave it alone for a few days.
AFter that, you always have the option to lager for a few weeks.  Maybe not in the kellerbier tradition, but it's your beer.