Author Topic: Old Newark Ale Yeast  (Read 10045 times)

Offline dzlater

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #60 on: December 02, 2010, 05:34:04 PM »
I mashed at 154, 153, 154. However let me say that the accuracy of my thermometers may be suspect.
Checked my thermometers out today, they were dead on.

Offline gmwren

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #61 on: December 09, 2010, 10:31:24 AM »
Anyone have experience with the other Old Newark yeast?

"ECY12 Old Newark beer: Sourced from the same defunct east coast brewery as ECY10, this pure strain was used as their “beer pitching yeast”. The strain has been identified as S. cerevisae, hence it is not a true lager strain, but should ferment at lager temperatures. Could this be the parent strain of Chico?
Suggested fermentation temp: 58-68°F, Apparent Attenuation: medium"

beveragebob

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #62 on: December 10, 2010, 02:28:17 AM »
It's too bad there isn't any DNA mapping of these yeast strains where we'd have  definitive characteristics that could be correlated to the yeast strains that the labs are selling. I wonder if the teaser about being the daddy of WY1056 that ECY actually knows this info. Being most yeast lab companies get strains from freeze dried cultures at some sort of yeast libraries, you think they would pass along the origin of the strains they sold as fact and not some dreamy sales reference. I'm sure there's proprieties involved with some of them. Too much mystery for me! I just want facts!

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #63 on: December 11, 2010, 12:54:33 AM »
People are working on yeast fingerprinting for just that reason.  The problem is a lot of brewing strains are too closely related to be able to differentiate between them with the techniques they're using, but maybe they'll come up with something else.  Right now it is mostly useful for quickly identifying contaminating strains.
Tom Schmidlin

beveragebob

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #64 on: December 11, 2010, 01:37:24 AM »
Thanks for the info Tom!

Offline Jeff Renner

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #65 on: December 13, 2010, 09:31:48 AM »
Just an aside, Bob.  I don't think the cultures are freeze dried but rather they are kept at -80C (-112F) in a 15% glycerol solution.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #66 on: December 13, 2010, 11:50:12 AM »
Yes, Jeff's right, -80C in glycerol.  I know that is how Wyeast does it.  I don't know the glycerol % though, that can vary.  I use 20% for mine.
Tom Schmidlin

beveragebob

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #67 on: December 14, 2010, 12:00:31 AM »
Roger that guys, thanks for the update. I love what ECY is doing but, I'm just tired of the marketing BS.

Offline skyler

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #68 on: January 06, 2011, 04:35:58 PM »
This yeast is great... but not for what I first used it for (a bitter). It is at least as clean and dry as Chico and a lot more flocculant. I expected, based on the description, that there would be some "characterful" esters, but I really get none - it is as clean as any yeast I've used - I would compare its performance to Pacman in term of attenuation, flocculance, and dryness. I expect this yeast to work great for the dry stout I am brewing this Sunday and for the DIPA I will follow that up with.

Offline skyler

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #69 on: January 10, 2011, 01:08:51 PM »
Sorry for not letting this old thread die, but I thought it worth sharing that I am successfully fermenting a dry stout with this yeast at ~57F. So, FWIW, this one will go very cold.