Author Topic: Old Newark Ale Yeast  (Read 8384 times)

Offline ninab

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #45 on: October 28, 2010, 06:35:24 PM »

beveragebob

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #46 on: November 03, 2010, 03:54:28 PM »
Thanks Nina, it works! Also, I have Ballantine Ale yeast in da house! Woo Hoo! Just mad a 2 liter starter but, I must say that the lovely container it came in was quite lively,,,real fresh! I'm going to brew tomorrow and I'm soo excited. Thank you for resurrecting the strain from what I'm guessing was a freeze dried culture from a microbiologist library of some sort!

Offline ninab

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #47 on: November 03, 2010, 05:12:41 PM »
What size batch are you making?  Generally the 125 ml bottles are designed to pitch directly into 5-6 gal.  Some folks doing direct pitches are reporting some mighty feisty fermentation - 'tis the magic of fresh healthy yeast!

beveragebob

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #48 on: November 04, 2010, 11:55:07 AM »
Im brewing 10 gallons of a BIPA clone Jeff Renner provided me with about 6 years ago.

Online hopfenundmalz

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #49 on: November 04, 2010, 12:54:55 PM »
Bob,

I know that Renner had posted a recipe on the old HBD, and have looked at it.  Maybe I will send an e-mail to let him know someone has the actual yeast, and to give this thread a look.

Edit: Sent Jeff a message.

« Last Edit: November 04, 2010, 01:01:19 PM by hopfenundmalz »
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Offline ryang

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #50 on: November 04, 2010, 01:25:59 PM »
Yeah I consulted Jeff's recipe on mine, and besides a few tweaks is pretty much the same.  Going into aging this week.

And about the yeast, I made a small starter (1qt) and the yeast exploded in the fermenter.  Went nuts.  In hindsight, probably no big need to make a starter.  Just did because I was worried about it going through the mail. 

beveragebob

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #51 on: November 04, 2010, 06:39:12 PM »
Roger that Ry! Let me know how it turns out. Are you going to age it a year on American Oak?

Offline ryang

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #52 on: November 05, 2010, 06:15:10 AM »
Roger that Ry! Let me know how it turns out. Are you going to age it a year on American Oak?
At least 8 or 9 months.  We'll see what it's doing by then.  A year is definately possible.

beveragebob

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #53 on: November 05, 2010, 12:31:10 PM »
The starter I made flocced out and is crystal clear! I'm posting my tweaked BIPA recipe in the recipe section if you want to compare notes.

Offline Jeff Renner

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #54 on: November 08, 2010, 09:32:40 AM »
I did do some research on Ballantine IPA a few years ago and that can be found on HBD.  I think two brewers sent me samples that they brewed based in part on my research, Larry O'Mahoney in 1998 and Beverage Bob in 2005.  Both were very nice IPAs but lacked that pungent hop presence of the original.  Mine did, too.

The old Yeast Culture Kit Company American ale yeast was different from both WhiteLabs and Wyeast, especially in its top cropping.  It threw a big head of yeast.  I think that Dan McConnell, the owner, got the yeast from a yeast bank, and I think he said it was the original Ballantine.  I should ask him.  It was also a little more characterful than either.

Let's see if I can post a photo of yeast skimming at the old Ballantine brewery



Hey, it worked!  You'll never get that from WhiteLabs or Wyeast versions, although in my experience Wyeast does throw a bit more of a yeast head than WhiteLabs.

The site  http://www.falstaffbrewing.com/ballantine_ale.htm (where this photo is) has a lot of of good history on Ballantine.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2010, 09:52:27 AM by Jeff Renner »
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beveragebob

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #55 on: November 09, 2010, 06:24:11 PM »
Look at the little step ladder they built so you can use it to climb in and out with.... The diving board must be on the other side :D

Offline skyler

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #56 on: November 29, 2010, 02:36:29 PM »
Man, I got my ECY10 bottle a week ago and it was less than half full (despite being sealed and unopened), but my starter took off within an hour. I have never seen a starter look so creamy so quickly. (I recall my "risen from the dead" Wyeast 3864 took 48 hours on the stir-plate to get going). I know my first beer with this is going to be a ~1.040 OG bitter, but I was also considering brewing up a dry stout with it. Someone on the NB forum said that "just about any yeast" will work for a dry stout, but, since it's a style I have not brewed since my early extract days, I thought I would ask the people here who have worked with ECY10 if you thought it would be a good choice for a dry stout.

Also, a few questions:
1) What temp should I ferment ECY at for a) a bitter, b) a dry stout, c) an IPA (my guess was to keep it around 62-64F for all of them)
2) Does the attenuation of this strain seem more akin to 1056, 1272, 1028? I only ask so I can better guage where to mash/how much crystal to use.

Offline dzlater

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #57 on: November 29, 2010, 03:12:29 PM »
I've done three beers with it repitching twice.
First was a 1.045 og beer with 78% attenuation
second was a brown ale 1.060 og 80% attenuation
third was a pale ale 1.043 og it's at 80% attenuation after one week
I fermented them all between 64 f and 68 f.
The pale ale is still in the fermentor but the other two turned out real well.
I think it would be great for a dry stout.

Offline skyler

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #58 on: November 29, 2010, 04:25:32 PM »
I've done three beers with it repitching twice.
First was a 1.045 og beer with 78% attenuation
second was a brown ale 1.060 og 80% attenuation
third was a pale ale 1.043 og it's at 80% attenuation after one week
I fermented them all between 64 f and 68 f.
The pale ale is still in the fermentor but the other two turned out real well.
I think it would be great for a dry stout.

Were you mashing those for dryness? 80% attenuation seems pretty intense if you were mashing in the 154-158 territory, but if that was at 146-150, it seems pretty on par with what I have been expecting.

Offline dzlater

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Re: Old Newark Ale Yeast
« Reply #59 on: November 30, 2010, 04:54:15 AM »
I mashed at 154, 153, 154. However let me say that the accuracy of my thermometers may be suspect.