Membership questions? Log in issues? Email info@brewersassociation.org

Author Topic: Tips for a newbie  (Read 885 times)

Offline scotttow@outlook.com

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 1
Tips for a newbie
« on: August 28, 2023, 05:43:32 pm »
Hello All,
  Just starting out and wanted to know if you'll had recommendations for a good starter kit.  I like pilsner in the German Style.
Thanks,
 Scott

Offline redrocker652002

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 761
Re: Tips for a newbie
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2023, 04:10:38 am »
I would say look at Craigslist and other places that people sell used stuff.  As far as advice, the biggest I can offer is patience. Enjoy the process and have fun with it. 

Offline neuse

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 305
  • New Bern, NC
Re: Tips for a newbie
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2023, 07:31:50 am »
Most starter kits are for extract brews. Some brewers start right in with all-grain, but there are less moving parts with extract. I lean toward a bucket fermenter, and no secondary. A bottling bucket unless you plan to start right out kegging. For extract, a 4 gallon kettle should work well. Generally, the other items are probably pretty similar between different kits.

Offline Andy Farke

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 465
  • Homebrewing Paleontologist
    • Andy's Brewing Blog
Re: Tips for a newbie
« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2023, 09:27:37 am »
Congrats on starting your homebrew adventures!


German-style pilsners are great (some of my favorite to brew), but...I would not recommend this as a first beer, because they can be challenging to ferment when you are still learning the process, if you want to have a super traditional result. Specifically, the better pilsners require pretty good temperature control (keeping it below 55 degrees ideally), and aren't very forgiving if something goes sideways. There are pseudo-lager possibilities -- e.g., using Lutra as your yeast -- that might be an OK fit for you. Northern Brewer has an extract kit called "Legend of Lutra" that might fit your needs, although I haven't brewed it myself. (as an editorial aside, Lutra does ferment pretty cleanly, *but* I wouldn't say it is necessarily lager-clean for flavor profile...although it can get close)


I would also second the advice from neuse -- extract brewing is a good mode for your first few batches, and then you can modify if you choose after that.


Good luck!
« Last Edit: August 31, 2023, 09:29:17 am by Andy Farke »
____________________________
Andy Farke, Homebrewer and Paleontologist
Website: http://www.andybrews.com
Twitter: @andyfarke
Facebook: Farke Brewing

Offline Drewch

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 569
  • Just this guy, you know?
Re: Tips for a newbie
« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2023, 03:51:43 pm »
My advice is start simple, start small. You can probably do some 1-2 gallon batches with mostly stuff that's already in your kitchen.  Grab a book like Izett's Speed Brewing and try a few small batches.
The Other Drew

Home fermentations since 2019.

Member at large of the Central Alabama Brewers Society and the League of Drews.

Offline brewthru

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 398
Re: Tips for a newbie
« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2023, 03:23:39 pm »
I'd avoid CR!!! Probably purchase some old crap that will totally turn one off to brewing.

Go to a local HBS, talk to them, discuss your wants and purchase the beginners "kit" from them.

Offline Cliffs

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 607
Re: Tips for a newbie
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2023, 09:45:02 am »
Join your local brweclub. Alot fo them have extra equipment and the knowledge they'll give you will be really helpful.

Offline brewthru

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 398
Re: Tips for a newbie
« Reply #7 on: September 15, 2023, 01:18:01 pm »
Also, I know this wasn't asked, but, read, read, read about brewing and brewing techniques.

Offline santoch

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1000
  • Riverview, FL
Re: Tips for a newbie
« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2023, 07:55:23 pm »
My biggest tip for a newbie is to give the yeast the time they need.  They work on their own schedule, not yours.
We know you are excited to try out your brews, but patience here is rewarded greatly.
Looking for a club near my new house
BJCP GM3/Mead Judge

Offline MNWayne

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 446
Re: Tips for a newbie
« Reply #9 on: September 28, 2023, 09:10:57 pm »
1st: Don't get caught up in the numbers. If the recipe says OG should be 1.056 and your batch comes in at 1.054, don't sweat it. Same with FG. 2nd: use your hydrometer to determine if the yeast is finished, not the absence or presence of bubbles.
Far better to dare mighty things....

Offline BrewBama

  • Official Poobah of No Life. (I Got Ban Hammered by Drew)
  • *********
  • Posts: 6021
Tips for a newbie
« Reply #10 on: September 29, 2023, 06:55:31 am »
Hello All,
  Just starting out and wanted to know if you'll had recommendations for a good starter kit.  I like pilsner in the German Style.
Thanks,
 Scott
If you mean starter kit as in ingredients, I recommend MoreBeer’s Pilsner. Remember to order yeast. I don’t think MoreBeer’s kits come with yeast. I recommend Imperial yeast so you won’t have to make a starter. Also, I recommend the large insulated shipper and 4 ice packs to help the yeast survive shipping. I know it’s $9 but it’s cheap insurance IMO (from one who has had DOA yeast delivered one too many times).

If you mean starter kit as in equipment, I recommend MoreBeer’s starter kit if you already have a 2.5-3 gallon pot at home, or the Premium kit if you don’t. The Premium kit has ingredients included but you may want to call to see if they’ll swap out a Pils kit because it isn’t a choice. I believe the reason Pilsner ingredients don’t come with the starter kits is because usually, lagers are fermented at a lower, controlled temperature and most beginner brewers don’t have that capability.

Cheers!
« Last Edit: September 29, 2023, 07:26:14 am by BrewBama »