Author Topic: hops transplant  (Read 1023 times)

Offline baynesbrew2

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
hops transplant
« on: October 06, 2010, 06:21:44 AM »
Hi all
planted hops for the first time this year.They did well for the most part but I feel I placed in a bad location.I would like to move them and was wondering when would be the best time ie. now or wait till spring

Offline micsager

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1000
    • View Profile
Re: hops transplant
« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2010, 08:06:54 AM »
Hi all
planted hops for the first time this year.They did well for the most part but I feel I placed in a bad location.I would like to move them and was wondering when would be the best time ie. now or wait till spring

I don't know for certain, but I usually transplant other things in December.  But, I live in the Northwest, where the ground seldom freezes. 

Offline bonjour

  • Administrator
  • Senior Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 1771
  • Troy, MI, 37mi, 60.9deg AR
    • View Profile
Re: hops transplant
« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2010, 08:23:21 AM »
consider that hops are shipped for purchase in the spring,  I would wait for spring.

Fred Bonjour
Co-Chair Mashing in Michigan 2014 AHA Conference in Grand Rapids, Michigan
AHA Governing Committee; AHA Conference, Club Support & Web Subcommittees



Everything under 1.100 is a 'session' beer ;)

Offline ryang

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 429
  • Indian Hills CO
    • View Profile
Re: hops transplant
« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2010, 12:27:58 PM »
although I haven't delt with transplanting hops (it's only my first year growing them)...

it's best to transplant other shrubs/trees/perennials in the fall.  it gives them a little bit of time to establish a couple roots, then can grow more vigorously in the spring without having to establish its stomping grounds first.

Besides the veggies, I do most of my gardening in the fall (I'm not a big annual kinda guy-except the veggies).  Transplanted hundreds of trees and shrubs this way for years.

Offline baynesbrew2

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: hops transplant
« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2010, 12:57:43 PM »
thanks for the replies .I was thinking along the same lines as ryang but wasn't sure If anyone else has any thoughts they would be appreciated. BTW I' m located in southern NJ

Offline EHall

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 566
    • View Profile
Re: hops transplant
« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2010, 01:13:30 PM »
If you don't get hard freezes in NJ then replant here anytime before it gets to cold. If you get hard freezes there I would wait til the groud thaws then transplant... either way mulch them very well, very thick and don't over/under water throughout the winter.
Phoenix, AZ

Offline corkybstewart

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1298
    • View Profile
Re: hops transplant
« Reply #6 on: October 06, 2010, 02:26:19 PM »
Wait until they start to sprout in the spring.  Then you'll know exactly where all the roots have spread to.  It won't hurt them at all to wait until next year.  You can also cut a few pieces off the crown , plant them and at least double the number of plants you have growing.
I'd really just rather be brewing in sunny Carlsbad New Mexico

Offline b-hoppy

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 81
    • View Profile
Re: hops transplant
« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2010, 08:53:51 PM »
up till about 10 years ago i did all my moving/digging in the spring.  problem is, it's usually a muddy mess most springs here in ohio.  i was in a situation where i had to move a crown to make room for another plant one fall.  everything went fine the next year.  i think most hop farmers are pretty burned out once harvest is over and just want to put things to bed for the year.  their big time for cultivating is in the spring so that's why most of the rhizomes are available at that time.  the big advantage of transplanting in the fall is that you have time all summer to prepare an area without all the cold muddy weather, also, the soil is warm at this time (compared to spring) which allows the roots to get a foothold until the soil freezes.  usually, things take right off the following spring. 

being that it's just a yearling, you won't have a hard time getting most of the roots.  don't sweat it if you lop a few off.  just dig out about a foot or two from the center of the crown and lightly loosen the soil.  you'll be able to see any rhizomes that have formed over the coarse of the year which you can trim off and use to establish new plants.  if you don't have a place for them yet, just dig a trench a few inches deep and cover them over with a good layer of soil/compost/manure.  next spring when it's time to plant, stick a shovel in the ground and dig 'em up!