Author Topic: Chloride Sulfate Ratio  (Read 9217 times)

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Chloride Sulfate Ratio
« Reply #15 on: November 03, 2010, 08:10:02 PM »
MOST of my beers lately have had more than 100 ppm chloride.  And, MOST of my beers lately have been pretty darn good.  I never cared about the chloride:sulfate ratio before, and I'm not about to anytime soon.  If I need calcium in my beer, I usually add CaCl2 first, because chloride is a mellow salty flavor, whereas gypsum has a bitter harshness to it.  I see no reason to use more gypsum and less CaCl2 just because of some "minerally" character.  I don't pick up minerallyness in my beers.  Granted, I have not made a pilsner or a Dort lately, either, where it might be easier to pick up.  But anyway... I don't fear "the ratio".  Get that calcium in there any way you can, and don't fear the chloride.
Dave

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Offline johnf

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Re: Chloride Sulfate Ratio
« Reply #16 on: November 03, 2010, 08:50:09 PM »
As a random datapoint, the most decorated brewery at the 2010 GABF adjust their water to have 100 ppm each chloride and sulfate. I don't find this company's (Firestone Walker's) beers to be particularly minerally which is not surprising as the absolute levels of sulfate and carbonate are low compared to Dortmund.

Offline thcipriani

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Re: Chloride Sulfate Ratio
« Reply #17 on: November 03, 2010, 09:12:51 PM »
Quote
As a random datapoint, the most decorated brewery at the 2010 GABF adjust their water to have 100 ppm each chloride and sulfate. I don't find this company's (Firestone Walker's) beers to be particularly minerally which is not surprising as the absolute levels of sulfate and carbonate are low compared to Dortmund.

I thought that they adjusted to 100ppm hardness as CaCO3 using CaCl2.H20 and CaSO4...or maybe it was 100ppm Ca++...or maybe I have no idea...
Tyler Cipriani
Longmont, CO

Offline johnf

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Re: Chloride Sulfate Ratio
« Reply #18 on: November 04, 2010, 05:20:12 AM »
Quote
As a random datapoint, the most decorated brewery at the 2010 GABF adjust their water to have 100 ppm each chloride and sulfate. I don't find this company's (Firestone Walker's) beers to be particularly minerally which is not surprising as the absolute levels of sulfate and carbonate are low compared to Dortmund.

I thought that they adjusted to 100ppm hardness as CaCO3 using CaCl2.H20 and CaSO4...or maybe it was 100ppm Ca++...or maybe I have no idea...

Maybe. I actually quoted that second hand from someone who had heard it on a CYBI show. The second hand quote was clear, but that person may have misunderstood what Brynildson said. I'll try to check the show today and get it from the horse's mouth.

Offline denny

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Re: Chloride Sulfate Ratio
« Reply #19 on: November 04, 2010, 09:50:37 AM »
Again, I prefer to use my tongue rather than a spreadsheet to tell me when my beer tastes right.

I completely agree, but I use a spreadsheet the first time I do a recipe.  Then, after I taste it, I decide how or if to change the treatments the next time.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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