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Author Topic: Knockout  (Read 713 times)

Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Knockout
« Reply #15 on: June 04, 2024, 02:04:25 pm »
Flame out

Knock out

Cast out

These terms all mean the same thing. When your time is out on the boil, flip off the heat and add the hops. Chill or run out to your chiller and leave all the kettle hops behind.
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Offline Homebrew_kev

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Re: Knockout
« Reply #16 on: June 10, 2024, 08:22:33 pm »
I wonder where the term "knockout" originated. What is being knocked out? I understand the origins of "flameout" and I wonder what the equivalent would be for electric brewers. Sparkout? Ampoff? Plugpull?

I understood Knock Out as removing the heat from the wort.

Offline joeinma

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Re: Knockout
« Reply #17 on: June 14, 2024, 09:20:23 am »
I wonder where the term "knockout" originated. What is being knocked out? I understand the origins of "flameout" and I wonder what the equivalent would be for electric brewers. Sparkout? Ampoff? Plugpull?

Just a guess, but I assume it goes back to when they used wood fires to heat the beer and they "knocked out" the the logs from under the kettle to stop the heat?

Offline denny

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Re: Knockout
« Reply #18 on: June 14, 2024, 09:36:45 am »
I wonder where the term "knockout" originated. What is being knocked out? I understand the origins of "flameout" and I wonder what the equivalent would be for electric brewers. Sparkout? Ampoff? Plugpull?

Just a guess, but I assume it goes back to when they used wood fires to heat the beer and they "knocked out" the the logs from under the kettle to stop the heat?

I've always heard it referred to as "knocking out the wort"
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Offline Cliffs

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Re: Knockout
« Reply #19 on: June 20, 2024, 05:55:02 pm »
One more difference between us homebrewers and the pros: at the homebrew level our beer typically stays at "knockout temp" for a much shorter period of time compared to large, commercial breweries.

Offline redrocker652002

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Re: Knockout
« Reply #20 on: June 20, 2024, 06:16:13 pm »
I am going to second or third or fourth what was already said.  To me, knockout and flameout are the same.  Once you turn off the flame to the boil kettle, those "knockout" or "flameout" hops go in and you start your cooling down.  I leave them in the kettle until the wort gets transferred to the fermenter.  I am by no means a pro, but from the reading and research I have done, this is what it means. Whirlpool hop addition simply means, to me, drop the temp to whatever the whirlpool addition says and let the hops steep and stir for however long the time is.  So, those hops sit a bit longer as they are there for the "whirlpool" and the cooling down period.  With that said, there are probably other interpretations of the phrase, but that is what I have taken it to mean. Rock on!!!!!!

Offline Cliffs

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Re: Knockout
« Reply #21 on: June 21, 2024, 11:00:00 am »
knockout, whirlpool seems to have meant the same thing until heavily hopped new style beers came along and the temp of the whirlpool became a bigger issue. From teh pro side, typically when the heat gets turned off, the whirlpool starts, so knockout and whirlpool are essentially interchangeable.