Author Topic: Leave Room For Dessert.  (Read 2892 times)

Offline bluesman

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Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
« Reply #30 on: November 10, 2010, 08:55:40 AM »
One Bowl Brownies.  The recipe is on the Baker's baking chocolate box.  This recipe makes the best brownies I have ever had.  Everyone that has tasted them agrees. ;D

Sounds like a good one!

I'd like to try that recipe sometime.
Ron Price

Offline flapjack

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Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
« Reply #31 on: November 10, 2010, 09:56:34 AM »
Another one of my hobbies besides brewing is making chocolates. I think I'm going to do a flavorful stout ganache in a dark chocolate shell next. Here's a pic of my Madagascar vanilla bean truffles and solid 58% dark chocolate squares.
James
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
« Reply #32 on: November 10, 2010, 10:01:22 AM »
Another one of my hobbies besides brewing is making chocolates. I think I'm going to do a flavorful stout ganache in a dark chocolate shell next. Here's a pic of my Madagascar vanilla bean truffles and solid 58% dark chocolate squares.
SWMBO just took a chocolate making class with friends, she had fun.  She's going to get some supplies and make some of her own, I'll have to suggest beer chocolates ;D  Do you have a recipe or at least a starting point for the stout ganache?
Tom Schmidlin

Offline flapjack

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Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
« Reply #33 on: November 10, 2010, 10:18:57 AM »
  Do you have a recipe or at least a starting point for the stout ganache?


A great book to check out is, Chocolates and Confections: Formula, Theory, and Technique for the Artisan Confectioner by Peter P. Greweling & The Culinary Institute of America, It helps to understand the science of chocolate making and has a good formula development section. I would start the ganache by reducing the stout to a syrup consistency, you want as little moisture in your ganache as possible, then you would have to play with the ratios of the chocolate, cream & stout reduction + butter,invert sugar & any other flavorings if using any.
James
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On Tap: FlapJack O'lantern Pumpkin Cream Ale
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Fermenting: Full Inch Imperial IPA
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
« Reply #34 on: November 10, 2010, 11:15:20 AM »
I would start the ganache by reducing the stout to a syrup consistency
Does your experience give you any idea how much of a reduction that is?  75%?  Do you think that would concentrate the bitterness too much, or will it be offset by the sugar?  Or would you start with something with low bitterness?

Thanks for the book recommendation :)
Tom Schmidlin

Offline redbeerman

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Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
« Reply #35 on: November 10, 2010, 01:14:16 PM »
Chocolate is the best! No, beer is!  Oh, never mind.
CH3CH2OH - Without it, life itself would be impossible.

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Offline flapjack

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Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
« Reply #36 on: November 10, 2010, 04:54:36 PM »
I would start the ganache by reducing the stout to a syrup consistency
Does your experience give you any idea how much of a reduction that is?  75%?  Do you think that would concentrate the bitterness too much, or will it be offset by the sugar?  Or would you start with something with low bitterness?

Thanks for the book recommendation :)

Heres the ganache formulation I use, its from Grewelings book

250g Heavy Cream
70g  Glucose Syrup
60g  Liqueur or liquid flavoring (beer reduction)
30g  Butter
620g Dark Chocolate

I would start out with at least a 50% reduction and maybe as much as 75%, just a guess. I'll keep you updated when I develop my recipe, I'll have to do some trial and error. The bitterness shouldn't be a huge factor since you're not using a large amount of the beer plus it should be offset by the sweetness of the glucose and chocolate (provided its not a high% dark chocolate), If its a highly bitter beer maybe try using a milk chocolate to make the ganache to balance it out.

James
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On Tap: FlapJack O'lantern Pumpkin Cream Ale
Fermenting: Power Sit-Up Golden Strong Ale
Fermenting: Full Inch Imperial IPA
Next Brew: Vigilante Imperial Stout

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
« Reply #37 on: November 10, 2010, 04:55:26 PM »
Great, thanks for the tips! :)
Tom Schmidlin

Online morticaixavier

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Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
« Reply #38 on: November 10, 2010, 04:57:45 PM »
I would start the ganache by reducing the stout to a syrup consistency
Does your experience give you any idea how much of a reduction that is?  75%?  Do you think that would concentrate the bitterness too much, or will it be offset by the sugar?  Or would you start with something with low bitterness?

Thanks for the book recommendation :)

Heres the ganache formulation I use, its from Grewelings book

250g Heavy Cream
70g  Glucose Syrup
60g  Liqueur or liquid flavoring (beer reduction)
30g  Butter
620g Dark Chocolate

I would start out with at least a 50% reduction and maybe as much as 75%, just a guess. I'll keep you updated when I develop my recipe, I'll have to do some trial and error. The bitterness shouldn't be a huge factor since you're not using a large amount of the beer plus it should be offset by the sweetness of the glucose and chocolate (provided its not a high% dark chocolate), If its a highly bitter beer maybe try using a milk chocolate to make the ganache to balance it out.



Not pros or even close but last year for xmas the wife and I made some RIS truffles with straight RIS no reduction and it came out pretty good. We just swapped out the liqour for the beer. lots of stouty flavor.
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
« Reply #39 on: November 21, 2010, 10:16:32 AM »
I have another whacky pie idea.

Im thinking of making a boiled peanut custard pie. Thinking along the lines of a bean pie or sweet potato pie. Boil the peanuts till soft then make a sweetened condensed milk and egg custard with them in the food processor.

And Flapjack those chocolates are unbelievable. True art work there? How did you get the white dots? Did you use some perf. material as a stencil?
« Last Edit: November 21, 2010, 12:37:00 PM by capozzoli »
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Offline nicneufeld

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Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
« Reply #40 on: November 22, 2010, 06:39:02 AM »
Here's a pic of my Madagascar vanilla bean truffles and solid 58% dark chocolate squares.

Those are well photographed and quite beautiful.  Almost would be a shame to eat them!  Almost being operative.

Offline brewmichigan

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Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
« Reply #41 on: November 22, 2010, 09:33:20 AM »
I made over 150 truffles for my wedding last year. Never again.

Making 20-25 truffles is not bad but working with 150 is a nightmare.
Mike --- Flint, Michigan

Offline flapjack

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Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
« Reply #42 on: December 09, 2010, 06:23:05 PM »
morticaixavier  you can definitely just use straight beer, I'm not a pro by any means, but what I have been taught is that water is an enemy of chocolate and the less water the longer the shelf life of the product.

capozzoli I think a peanut custard pie of some sort would be amazing! let me know if you come up with a good recipe. As for the white dots they are from a transfer sheet. Its just colored cocoa butter that's designed on as plastic sheet called a "transfer sheet" applied to warm chocolate & then once sets the cocoa butter design adheres to the chocolate giving it that amazing design, easier than it looks.
James
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On Tap: FlapJack O'lantern Pumpkin Cream Ale
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Offline weazletoe

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Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
« Reply #43 on: December 09, 2010, 06:31:44 PM »
Well, we're talking desserts now. All I can say is, BLECH!! The Weaze don't do sweets. Rarely do I touch pies, cakes, cookies, ice cream etc.....

  But, that aside, I can maked some pretty killer bourbon balls. A package of Nilla wafers gone thorugh the food processor, a bit of cocoa powder, and whiskey. Mix it all up, and roll out your balls, then chill them.
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Offline weazletoe

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Re: Leave Room For Dessert.
« Reply #44 on: December 09, 2010, 06:32:34 PM »
roll out your balls, then chill them.


  In retro-spect, I'm sure there is a better way I could have phrased that.  :-\
A man works hard all week, so he doesn't have to wear pants all weekend.