Author Topic: Ph question for IPA recipe  (Read 8317 times)

Offline denny

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Re: Ph question for IPA recipe
« Reply #30 on: October 29, 2010, 08:46:54 AM »
This brings up that high degree of fermentability for Rahr 2-row that I brought up recently.  A brewer here in Indy reports that he tends to get the same high degree of fermentability when using this base malt, regardless of the mashing temperature.  He says he controls the fermentability of the wort by adjusting the percentage of crystal and less fermentable grains in the grist.

Hmm...

As I posted when you first brought that up, I haven't experienced that and I use Rahr almost exclusively.
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Offline Pawtucket Patriot

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Re: Ph question for IPA recipe
« Reply #31 on: October 29, 2010, 03:25:43 PM »
Quote
As I posted when you first brought that up, I haven't experienced that and I use Rahr almost exclusively.

+1

I use Rahr 2-row almost exclusively too. I haven't noticed it being any more or less responsive to mash temp as far as its fermentability.
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Offline skyler

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Re: Ph question for IPA recipe
« Reply #32 on: November 06, 2010, 01:21:14 AM »
What kind of hops are you using? One possible issue could be hop choice (beta acids and co-humulone and other things I barely understand). If you are looking for a more aggressive bitterness, try bittering with chinook or ctz. If your beer was a Simcoe/Amarillo/Citra IPA, it would probably be a lot more smooth and less noticeably bitter than the same IBU's with lower co-humulone hops. I also find noble hops produce a fairly sturdy bitterness when used excessively early in the boil.