Author Topic: Beer won't carbonate  (Read 2534 times)

Offline gordo61

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Beer won't carbonate
« on: November 06, 2010, 10:29:48 PM »
I kegged a Cream Ale this past Monday. I put approximately 25 pounds of CO2 on it and now it is Saturday night and it is not yet carbonated. I have found no leaks. I am mind boggled. I have not had this problem before. Anybody have any ideas?

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Beer won't carbonate
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2010, 10:52:46 PM »
At 25 psi it should be well carbonated.

Like I said in the other thread, as a sanity check, make sure the gas is really connected and all shutoffs between the gauge and the keg are fully open.  Remove the gas connector and re-attach it.  Turn off the gas at the tank and vent the keg - watch the needle drop.  If the needle doesn't drop, the keg is not connected.

It's possible your gauge is wrong, but with this kind of problem I usually find I've done something wrong hooking it up.   ;)
Tom Schmidlin

Offline gordonstrong

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Re: Beer won't carbonate
« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2010, 11:33:17 PM »
Is the beer chilled?  That will help the CO2 go into solution.  Did you check that there's gas in the tank (weigh it) and that it is flowing? (push on the stem on the gas ball valve and see if gas comes out)

Pick up the keg by either end, turn on the gas, and gently rock it back and forth like you're trying to make a ball roll from the top to the bottom and back again.  Listen to hear if gas is moving.  You should be able to hear it at the tank/regulator, and you should be able to hear some bubbling inside the keg.

With a chilled keg and 30psi, I carbonate my beer this way in about 5 minutes.  Let it rest a few days, chilled, vent the pressure, and see how it's going.  Adjust if necessary.

I never really liked the "leave the gas on the keg" approach since it takes a long time and can make your tank run dry if there is a leak anywhere.  But it does work, so if your keg is totally flat, start the Christmas tree light troubleshooting technique (start at one end and make sure each piece is working properly, starting with the tank of gas).
Gordon Strong • Beavercreek, Ohio • AHA Member since 1997 • Twitter: GordonStrong

Offline euge

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Re: Beer won't carbonate
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2010, 11:48:12 PM »
I kegged a Cream Ale this past Monday. I put approximately 25 pounds of CO2 on it and now it is Saturday night and it is not yet carbonated. I have found no leaks. I am mind boggled. I have not had this problem before. Anybody have any ideas?

Bound to be a simple answer. Almost always is, When you say "I have not had this problem before" what is your setup and method? Was everything working for you previously? Thus far we have a time period (six days) and a pressure setting (25psi). Please give us more info it will help tremendously.

The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline Hydro

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Re: Beer won't carbonate
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2010, 10:47:27 PM »
Pick up the keg by either end, turn on the gas, and gently rock it back and forth like you're trying to make a ball roll from the top to the bottom and back again.  Listen to hear if gas is moving.  You should be able to hear it at the tank/regulator, and you should be able to hear some bubbling inside the keg.
I am sure you have probably found your problem and are enjoying your beer.  Here is bit of information to help you when wanting to force carb a cornie keg.

I would make sure the keg is standing straight up when I am hooking up and disconnecting the gas line.  Now hook up the gas line to the cornie keg and open the regulator and gas valves to the keg.  Once the keg has charged to 25 to 30 lbs then close the gas valves and disconnect the gas line.  Now shake the keg, give it a few minutes to rest.  Re hook up the gas line and open gas valves.  You will then hear gas entering into the keg.  Repeat this 3 - 4 times.

The reason for disconnecting the gas line is to protect your regulator from having beer pushed back up through the gas line into your regulator, manifolds, and or gagues.  

I try to be careful with the hope to avoid having additional problems.


« Last Edit: December 05, 2010, 12:09:47 AM by robertwoodson »
For the Love of Beer,
Hydro

On Tap Now:
1. Irish Red Ale
2. American Amber Ale
3. Kolsch
4. Scotch Ale
5. Strong Scotch Ale
6. Key Lime Pie (11%) Chilled to 29 deg. F. you can not even taste the alcohol.

It is time to start brewing again.