Author Topic: Mashing Methods  (Read 929 times)

Offline flapjack

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Mashing Methods
« on: October 26, 2010, 02:14:52 PM »
Does anyone have a good resource for the mashing methods that include detailed steps & explanations for each of them and also contains the best method to use for specific beer styles? I've found quite a bit online but nothing that really covers the methods in great detail. Thanks 
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Offline denny

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Re: Mashing Methods
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2010, 02:28:17 PM »
FWIW, I've found that it's more malt specific than style specific.
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Offline beerocracy

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Re: Mashing Methods
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2010, 10:46:25 AM »
Definitely the best introduction to mashing for a home brewer is How to Brew by John Palmer.

Offline euge

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Re: Mashing Methods
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2010, 11:16:42 AM »
Definitely the best introduction to mashing for a home brewer is How to Brew by John Palmer.

He breaks it down extremely well. There are different approaches/methods be it equipment, heating, handling and lautering. But in the end the grain has to sit and mash until converted.
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Offline ipaguy

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Re: Mashing Methods
« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2010, 02:57:33 PM »
Dave Miller's 'Homebrewing Guide' has a very good explanation of what goes on in mashing, as well as info on different methods.  At 15 yr. old it's a little outdated on stuff like yeast varieties, but still a classic.
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Offline davidw

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Re: Mashing Methods
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2010, 10:53:16 AM »
Does anyone have a good resource for the mashing methods that include detailed steps & explanations for each of them . . .  

This is not a good, but a great resource:

http://www.amazon.com/Brewmasters-Bible-Gold-Standard-Brewers/dp/0060952164/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1289324334&sr=8-1

Snyder outlines single infusion, multistep, decoction, and partigyle mashing methods. He also gives various temp and time regimes to produce worts with different characteristics and makes suggestions as to what styles benefit (or would be best produced) using the different mashing methods. Keep in mind this was written around the time that under modified malts were still rather common compared to today when nearly everything is highly modified. And as Denny mentions, it's really more about the malt you are using than what particular style you are trying to achieve. However, this book does an excellent job of presenting the methods that have been common in the past. And there is some fun to be had in replicating them, whether or not there is any noticeable effect on the finished product.

Another great source that mainly focuses on German brewing processes is Greg Noonan's New Brewing Lager:

http://www.amazon.com/New-Brewing-Lager-Beer-Comprehensive/dp/0937381829/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1289324974&sr=8-1

A lot of info on what is going on during different mashing methods, when they are best used, etc.