Poll

How long do you mash for?

15-30 minutes
30-45 minutes
45-60 minutes
over an hour
as long as it takes to get my pants off

Author Topic: Why mash for 60 minutes?  (Read 8616 times)

Offline Kit B

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 556
  • Kit B - Bottineau Prairie, MN
    • View Profile
Re: Why mash for 60 minutes?
« Reply #30 on: November 01, 2010, 01:40:45 PM »
On my 4th all-grain batch, I had to mash for 70 minutes, until an iodine test showed full conversion.
...Not sure what happened, but that oatmeal stout turned out awesome!
-    Head Cook & Bottle Washer    -
-      Bottineau Prairie Brewing      -

FBDU: Prairie & Northwoods Mobile Superintendant

Offline timmyr

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 117
    • View Profile
Re: Why mash for 60 minutes?
« Reply #31 on: November 15, 2010, 03:38:42 PM »
I think in the end, what enzymes do what work and how well they access the starches and proteins in the grain is what will determine fermentability.  I used to think that it could happen REALLY fast, but I've since been convinced that resting a little longer to make sure all the starches have been liquified and converted makes some sense.  Plus, I am not really worried about the extra 20 minutes or so I sit and wait for my mash to finish. 

I do know that thicker mashes will tend to provide the enzymes some thermal insulation and allow the lower-temp enzymes (protease for example) to work a bit longer and thinner mashes will then not favor those lower-temp tolerant enzymes but be more partial to the enzymes that have greater heat tolerance.

I want to read Kai's info again...didn't he discuss this at NHC too? 
Cheers,

Timmy

On
APA
American Brown
Harvest Rye
New England Cider
Soon
More Cider