Author Topic: Oxygenating Wort  (Read 3859 times)

Offline johnf

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Re: Oxygenating Wort
« Reply #15 on: November 16, 2010, 11:08:54 AM »
Mix Stir for normal batches, pure O2 through a sintered stone for big batches.

Just curious, why the difference?  I use pure O2 for all batches, more for big 'uns.
Shaking the bejeesus out of a regular strength batch of ale is enough oxygenation for the yeast. For lagers and high gravity ales shaking with air won't get enough oxygen into solution for the yeast.

Well in Gordon's case getting out the drill and the mix-stir (and sanitizing the latter) is about as involved as getting out the sintered stone and 02 tank.

My guess is that with the mix-stir you can reliably saturate with air with for normal gravity ales is going to be 8 ppm and for normal gravity lagers maybe closer to 10 ppm. If that's about exactly what Gordon wants, saturation with air takes out the guesswork involved with 02 assuming no DO meter is available.

Offline gordonstrong

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Re: Oxygenating Wort
« Reply #16 on: November 16, 2010, 11:46:45 AM »
Oxygen is a consumable.  It costs money and I have to go to the hardware store to get it.  The Mix-Stir just uses battery charge on a rechargeable drill.  It's also easier to clean the mix-stir (marginally).  So I use the Mix-Stir when possible.

I use more O2 on bigger batches because I really want to encourage the best growth environment for the yeast.

There's no problem with using O2 on normal batches.  It is just faster and less hassle for me to use the Mix-Stir.

I don't have DO measuring equipment so I don't know the difference between the methods.  I just found something that reliably works, so that's what I do.

Basically, I try to optimize my process to the point where I can use easier indirect measurements that I know will give me desired results.  I know I need to run my O2 full blast for a minute.  I know I need to use the Mix-Stir on a certain setting for a certain time.  I don't need to measure DO levels because I know following my process for these times will give me what I want.

Sort of like I don't measure my water-to-grist ratio; I do it until it looks right. 
Gordon Strong • Beavercreek, Ohio • AHA Member since 1997 • Twitter: GordonStrong

Offline ipaguy

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Re: Oxygenating Wort
« Reply #17 on: November 16, 2010, 06:51:55 PM »
I just use a siphon sprayer http://www.midwestsupplies.com/siphon-sprayer.html when transferring to my fermenter.  I think that one thing that helps me out is that I get my wort quite cool before siphoning, around 66-68F.  Oxygen is a lot more soluble in cooler liquid.  Sure, the yeast would grow a little faster if I pitched at 70-80F, but so would any nasty bugs.  Never had any problems with this method, even with high gravity beers.
Primary: gotlandsdricke/alt/dunkel hybrid
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Offline ajk

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Re: Oxygenating Wort
« Reply #18 on: November 17, 2010, 08:07:31 AM »
I dump from bucket to bucket from waist height 8 times.  I've heard this method attributed to George Fix but can't find a direct citation.  I've used a MixStir with comparable results, but I find the extra bucket easier to clean.

Offline bluesman

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Re: Oxygenating Wort
« Reply #19 on: November 17, 2010, 10:44:23 AM »
I dump from bucket to bucket from waist height 8 times.  I've heard this method attributed to George Fix but can't find a direct citation.  I've used a MixStir with comparable results, but I find the extra bucket easier to clean.

I know some homebrewers that employ this method with good results. In a pinch, I plan to use this method as well.
Ron Price

Offline pmallory

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Re: Oxygenating Wort
« Reply #20 on: November 27, 2010, 12:54:11 PM »
For all my brews I place the yeast starters on the stir plate.  Then as soon as I inoculate the wort with the yeast, I add a dose of  pure oxygen through a carb stone.  If it's a high gravity brew (9% - 12%) not only am I adding a high yeast count, but I come back twelve hours later and add some more pure oxygen through a carb stone.   



Is there a point when you shouldn't add more oxygen to the fermentation? Won't oxygen at a certain point create vinegar flavors? Or could you just keep adding oxygen to the fermentation? I am guessing some commercial breweries add oxygen through the fermentation.

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Oxygenating Wort
« Reply #21 on: November 27, 2010, 11:43:33 PM »
Is there a point when you shouldn't add more oxygen to the fermentation? Won't oxygen at a certain point create vinegar flavors? Or could you just keep adding oxygen to the fermentation? I am guessing some commercial breweries add oxygen through the fermentation.
The main reason to stop adding oxygen is to prevent oxidizing the beer - it doesn't taste like vinegar though, unless you have acetobacter in there.  Commercial brewers don't add oxygen throughout the fermentation, but some add additional O2 early in fermentation for really strong beers to help the yeast along.
Tom Schmidlin