Author Topic: What's For Dinner?  (Read 78496 times)

Offline hamiltont

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Re: What's For Dinner?
« Reply #165 on: March 04, 2011, 01:45:52 PM »
We had herring tonight. Bones everywhere, and a little tedious.
I guess that's why I like mine pickled...  ;)  Cheers!!!
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Offline novabrew

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Re: What's For Dinner?
« Reply #166 on: March 04, 2011, 02:37:06 PM »
We're doing German tonight with a nice Kolsch to wash it down.

Offline punatic

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Re: What's For Dinner?
« Reply #167 on: March 04, 2011, 03:30:50 PM »
We had herring tonight. Bones everywhere, and a little tedious.

I do not enjoy food that has bones in it. I like out-of-hand food with bones in it (chicken, ribs, turkey drumsticks...) but not dishes where the bones (or pits) are cooked in.  Guess I'm weird that way.

Mrs. Punatic has been trying to change that for going on 15 years now without success.  She makes an awesome pork paprikash.  She used to make it with bone-in country style ribs.  Now she makes it with boneless pork because of me - claims it's not as good that way.  All I can say is it ROCKS without bones!

Now ya did it... gonna hafta request some pork paprikash for dinner tonight.  She makes a shredded cabbage salad to go with it (not coleslaw)...  YUM!!
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Offline tubercle

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Re: What's For Dinner?
« Reply #168 on: March 04, 2011, 03:48:25 PM »
What is this cabbage salad you speak of?
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Offline punatic

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Re: What's For Dinner?
« Reply #169 on: March 04, 2011, 06:42:03 PM »
What is this cabbage salad you speak of?

OK, got the lowdown from Mrs. Punatic.  She says technique is what makes this salad work.  I believe her cause I've tried it on my own and it wasn't nearly as good as hers.  When I asked her for the recipe and she said, "I have to show you this. The super fine strips are what make this salad work."

#1 You need a sharp chef's knife.  She uses a Wusthof santoku.

Take a head of regular green cabbage and cut it in half.  
Now the intent is to make super-fine julienne strips of cabbage.
She holds the round part of the cabbage half, places the edge of the cut cabbage on the cutting board and lays the flat of the knife blade against the flat side of the cabbage.  
Starting below the center of the cabbage she shaves very thin strips of cabbage using a sawing motion.  
When you've cut away a section of the cabbage, rotate it to an uncut section and continue shaving away super fine strips.

When you've got enough cabbage strips for your needs, move on to minced onion.
Everything else is proportioned to your taste.

the rest of the ingredients are
minced onion,
vinegar (wife says she likes plain ole white vinegar in this salad)
oil
salt & pepper

Another thing Mrs. Punatic says is important is mixing it lomi lomi style (by hand)
she's a massage therapist, so that figures, huh?

All I can say is the flavors and textures of the pork paprikash and cabbage salad are deliciously synergistic.
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Offline gordonstrong

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Re: What's For Dinner?
« Reply #170 on: March 04, 2011, 08:31:05 PM »
For super fine cabbage, I use a mandoline. Fast and uniform.
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Offline punatic

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Re: What's For Dinner?
« Reply #171 on: March 04, 2011, 09:06:17 PM »
For super fine cabbage, I use a mandoline. Fast and uniform.

We're in Hawaii.  Do you suppose an ukulele would work instead?   ;)
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Offline tubercle

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Re: What's For Dinner?
« Reply #172 on: March 05, 2011, 06:21:30 AM »
What is this cabbage salad you speak of?

OK, got the lowdown from Mrs. Punatic.  She says technique is what makes this salad work.  I believe her cause I've tried it on my own and it wasn't nearly as good as hers.  When I asked her for the recipe and she said, "I have to show you this. The super fine strips are what make this salad work."

#1 You need a sharp chef's knife.  She uses a Wusthof santoku.

Take a head of regular green cabbage and cut it in half.  
Now the intent is to make super-fine julienne strips of cabbage.
She holds the round part of the cabbage half, places the edge of the cut cabbage on the cutting board and lays the flat of the knife blade against the flat side of the cabbage.  
Starting below the center of the cabbage she shaves very thin strips of cabbage using a sawing motion.  
When you've cut away a section of the cabbage, rotate it to an uncut section and continue shaving away super fine strips.

When you've got enough cabbage strips for your needs, move on to minced onion.
Everything else is proportioned to your taste.

the rest of the ingredients are
minced onion,
vinegar (wife says she likes plain ole white vinegar in this salad)
oil
salt & pepper

Another thing Mrs. Punatic says is important is mixing it lomi lomi style (by hand)
she's a massage therapist, so that figures, huh?

All I can say is the flavors and textures of the pork paprikash and cabbage salad are deliciously synergistic.


   Ahhh...We call that vinegar slaw or BBQ slaw around here. It's used as a side dish when serving pulled pork or putting on a BBQ sandwich. Especially popular in the eastern N.C. area.
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Offline punatic

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Re: What's For Dinner?
« Reply #173 on: March 05, 2011, 10:03:31 AM »

   Ahhh...We call that vinegar slaw or BBQ slaw around here. It's used as a side dish when serving pulled pork or putting on a BBQ sandwich. Especially popular in the eastern N.C. area.

Well, that's me... always late to the party.  Great flavor and texture though!

You think a ukulele might work?
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Offline tubercle

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Re: What's For Dinner?
« Reply #174 on: March 05, 2011, 10:09:02 AM »

   Ahhh...We call that vinegar slaw or BBQ slaw around here. It's used as a side dish when serving pulled pork or putting on a BBQ sandwich. Especially popular in the eastern N.C. area.

Well, that's me... always late to the party.  Great flavor and texture though!

You think a ukulele might work?

A ukulele might. The last time I tried to slice cabbage with a mandolin it kept knocking it out of tune.
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Offline gmac

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Re: What's For Dinner?
« Reply #175 on: March 05, 2011, 03:16:37 PM »


A ukulele might. The last time I tried to slice cabbage with a mandolin it kept knocking it out of tune.

Groan....

For me, tonight is wing night with the neighbours.  I make a Thai inspired wing with coconut milk, soy, brown sugar, honey, chiles, garlic, fish sauce, rice wine vinegar, bit of sesame oil, lots of fresh cilantro and basil.  Wings come out of the turkey fryer and into the sauce.  Mix em up.  Awesome.

Offline phillamb168

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Re: What's For Dinner?
« Reply #176 on: March 07, 2011, 04:07:20 AM »


A ukulele might. The last time I tried to slice cabbage with a mandolin it kept knocking it out of tune.

Groan....

For me, tonight is wing night with the neighbours.  I make a Thai inspired wing with coconut milk, soy, brown sugar, honey, chiles, garlic, fish sauce, rice wine vinegar, bit of sesame oil, lots of fresh cilantro and basil.  Wings come out of the turkey fryer and into the sauce.  Mix em up.  Awesome.

Man, that right there is a reason why I miss the US and A sometimes. How fun would that be, a hot wings night with neighbors! My neighbors are way too %*&# picky about what they eat.
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Offline phillamb168

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Re: What's For Dinner?
« Reply #177 on: March 07, 2011, 04:15:29 AM »
It's good. Had some metallic tones, but not offensive in an otherwise malty beer.

Picked up the Meantime chocolate porter and IPA. Wife is making POUTINE tonight because I am not fat enough to roast yet. We just signed a $500,000 life insurance policy on myself so I wonder if she's trying to arrange an early retirement...

Will post pics of poutine tonight

Damn I've always wanted to try that dish! Let us know how the beer is.

Voila pics. First, for appetizers, SWMBO went to the Armenian store.

Here's the (gigantic!) Lavash (with baby for scale):


And here's canned eggplant. We had this the following day, over linguini:


The beer selection for the evening. Wife LOVES Traquair.


And, I had this Fleurac Brown IPA which was quite possibly the best IPA I've found in France.



In my mind it was more of an imperial IPA (8.5% ABV) and was LOADED with Cascade. Deeeeelish. Buying a case of this soon, I think, and going to try to visit the brewery. They're in Auvergne, and I've always wanted to go there. There's a regional dish called "Aligot" which is pureed potatoes made with melted Cantal (hard cheese) and garlic. It's great:

And finally poutine. Usually I make the gravy from scratch, but this time we bought some powdered stuff that worked out fine.


Then, Sunday, it was beautiful out so we had Meantime's IPA and Volcelest's "Printemps" ("Springtime") offering. Both the Meantime IPA and Chocolate stout were really lacking in body. Quite watery. The Volcelest had a nice Coriander and Orange thing going for it. We had this with an interesting French sandwich. I didn't take pics, but basically it was a fresh-baked pita stuffed with (get this) a puree of Sardines and St Moray. There was also a chive/goat cheese/honey mixture which the wife had. St Moray, btw, is what Philadelphia Cream Cheese was aspiring to be when it was first invented.




« Last Edit: March 07, 2011, 04:23:41 AM by phillamb168 »
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Offline nicneufeld

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Re: What's For Dinner?
« Reply #178 on: March 07, 2011, 06:38:16 AM »
Very nice couple of meals, that!!!  Poutine sounds like a guilty pleasure food I haven't discovered yet.

Last night (I should say yesterday because I was doing some kind of prep work just about all afternoon) I did a paella over a charcoal fire.  Started with a dollop of bacon fat, then fried a couple diced onions and lots of diced garlic.  Added chicken coated in paprika, oregano, salt and pepper.  Then added diced red pepper, mushrooms, celery...bit of water to ward off burning.  Then after it had softened, some diced sun dried tomatoes, green olives, some roasted and diced anaheim chilies, and more spices (paprika again, fennel, thyme, oregano, rosemary, crushed red pepper, and salt/pepper).  Then a cup and a half of rice, a shot of achiote oil, and 2-3 cups of chicken stock went in.

Stirred it well, and put the lid on the weber after dropping a chunk of hickory wood around the edge of the fire.  Gave it 25 minutes or so to cook.  Smoked paella!

Offline phillamb168

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Re: What's For Dinner?
« Reply #179 on: March 07, 2011, 07:04:13 AM »
Very nice couple of meals, that!!!  Poutine sounds like a guilty pleasure food I haven't discovered yet.

Last night (I should say yesterday because I was doing some kind of prep work just about all afternoon) I did a paella over a charcoal fire.  Started with a dollop of bacon fat, then fried a couple diced onions and lots of diced garlic.  Added chicken coated in paprika, oregano, salt and pepper.  Then added diced red pepper, mushrooms, celery...bit of water to ward off burning.  Then after it had softened, some diced sun dried tomatoes, green olives, some roasted and diced anaheim chilies, and more spices (paprika again, fennel, thyme, oregano, rosemary, crushed red pepper, and salt/pepper).  Then a cup and a half of rice, a shot of achiote oil, and 2-3 cups of chicken stock went in.

Stirred it well, and put the lid on the weber after dropping a chunk of hickory wood around the edge of the fire.  Gave it 25 minutes or so to cook.  Smoked paella!

That's a good idea I'm gonna have to try, smoked paella sounds really good. I think pimenton/smoked paprika is added normally and in this case it seems smoking the whole thing would be pretty tasty.

No calamari though?
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