Author Topic: WL029 yeast help  (Read 596 times)

Offline BrewQwest

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WL029 yeast help
« on: November 23, 2010, 06:24:21 AM »
ok all, I need some good education on this...  I brewed up a batch of Kolsch on Friday the 19th.  For yeast I used a harvested WL029 from a light cream ale. The harvest consisted of 3 mason quart jars containing approximately 3/8 inch yeast layer in each jar. This would give me just over an inch of yeast to pitch. My intent was to ferment this at 59-60F which I had read on this forum was a great temp to ferment Kolsch at. I figured with this much yeast I could bypass the starter. The yeast was a month old. At pitching time, my wort was at 55F, my yeast was 58F. I figured this would allow the yeast and wort to come up to my planned fermentation temp. For all three jars, I decanted off until the yeast got to the mouth of the jar. This left me with just enough liquid in each jar enabling a swirl and pitch. On the morning of the 22nd, the temp of the wort was at 59F and nothing was happenning in my 30 liter carboy. The s-bubbler's liquid level hadn't budged.  I went to White Labs web site and it said this yeast needs to be in the mid 60's to optimally ferment. So I warmed it to 64F and it began taking off. I am now holding it at 65F and it's chomping away happily with a nice sized krausen on top.  How are you all able to ferment this yeast colder? Did I need to have more than an inch of yeast to do this?  At the colder temp I still should have gotten a good krausen shouldn't have I? Or should I have taken a couple liters of the wort, placed it in a flask and then added the yeast to that in order to get it going at the lower temp? Then pitch into the remainder of the wort??  As usual any and all advise is always appreciated from this group.  cheers!!
... Needed to add here that the starting gravity of the kolsch was 12.5BRIX or 1.050....
« Last Edit: November 23, 2010, 06:27:43 AM by BrewQwest »
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Offline bluesman

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Re: WL029 yeast help
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2010, 07:45:23 AM »
I've used this yeast in a Kolsch and pitched at 58 and then raised it to 60F. If my memory serves me right, this yeast took quite a while to get going and was slow and steady to ferment. I can say that I much prefer the WLP029 over the Wyeast 2565.  The flavor profile of 029 is fruitier and it floccs out much better. I haven't tried this yeast over 60F so I'm not sure how that will impact your beer but my mind's eye says it should be fine.  ;)

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Ron
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Offline EHall

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Re: WL029 yeast help
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2010, 08:05:55 AM »
Its recommended to ferment at mid 60s, once completed then you can 'lager' it, this will give you the clean lager like profile you're after with an ale strain.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: WL029 yeast help
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2010, 10:33:33 AM »
Its recommended to ferment at mid 60s, once completed then you can 'lager' it, this will give you the clean lager like profile you're after with an ale strain.

I know that is the reccomendation, but this yeast ferments fine in the high 50s, especially if you pitch enough yeast. The trick is to warm it up into the mid 60s near the end or it c an have a tendency to stall.
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Offline gordonstrong

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Re: WL029 yeast help
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2010, 12:49:59 PM »
It works for me at 58F.  Both wyeast and white labs versions.  However, I wouldn't really say either floc'd well.  I always have to filter or fine to make it look right.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: WL029 yeast help
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2010, 01:09:08 PM »
It works for me at 58F.  Both wyeast and white labs versions.  However, I wouldn't really say either floc'd well.  I always have to filter or fine to make it look right.

Agreed. I also used fining for both. (gelatin)

However, from my experience the 029 floc'd "better" than the 2565.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: WL029 yeast help
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2010, 01:11:46 PM »
It clears up quicker than the WY strain. I don't filter it but a little gelatin in the secondary clears it up nicely for me.

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Offline Rhoobarb

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Re: WL029 yeast help
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2010, 01:56:44 PM »
I use 029 for my Kolsch and several other beers (Alt, Cream Ale, Cali Common, even a Chocolate Stout).  I like to keep it ~62oF and give it a long time.  Usual Kolsch procedure for me is a month in primary, keg it with gelatin and let the kegs sit cool for a couple of months before serving.  It'll come out looking just like majorvices' up there!
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Offline majorvices

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Re: WL029 yeast help
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2010, 02:06:01 PM »
I use 029 for my Kolsch and several other beers (Alt, Cream Ale, Cali Common, even a Chocolate Stout).  I like to keep it ~62oF and give it a long time.  Usual Kolsch procedure for me is a month in primary, keg it with gelatin and let the kegs sit cool for a couple of months before serving.  It'll come out looking just like majorvices' up there!

Mine is usually about 2 weeks in primary and, often, as little as two weeks in secondary at lagering temps. I enjoy these beers best when they are fresh.
Keith Y.
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