Author Topic: carbonation for dunkelweizen  (Read 4904 times)

Offline octess

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carbonation for dunkelweizen
« on: November 29, 2010, 02:11:14 AM »
Hi all!
Dunkelweizen ready to bubblely!
I've took a look at    http://www.tastybrew.com/calculators/carbonation.html
and it recommends about 28 PSI for this style (at 40F). Isn't it gonna be too fizzy in the glassy?
Thanks!
Guy
Viva el art of brewing alchemy!

Offline gordonstrong

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Re: carbonation for dunkelweizen
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2010, 02:52:11 AM »
German wheat beers should be fizzy. Not sure of the calculation. Let your tongue tell you if it's right.
Gordon Strong • Beavercreek, Ohio • AHA Member since 1997 • Twitter: GordonStrong

Offline octess

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Re: carbonation for dunkelweizen
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2010, 04:16:09 AM »
I like the tongue thing but if its too hot, it'll be a pain to take the fizz out won't it?
I'm trying to get the right feel for the style, hopefully right at first!
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: carbonation for dunkelweizen
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2010, 05:28:47 AM »
That P&T will put you up around 4 volumes of CO2, which is in the range for hefeweizen but isn't a rule.  Start lower if you like and see how it is, then turn it up and keep testing it.  It will be a pain though, because to do it right once the dissolved gas level has stabilized at each point you'll need to keep making the hose longer as you turn up the gas to get the right pour.  It's less hose consuming to start higher and make the hose shorter as you go, but then you have the problem of getting the CO2 out of solution.  Or you could bottle some test samples with different amounts of sugar to get varying levels of carbonation, and then see where you like it.

I think it will be a pain no matter what you choose to do.  But only you can decide what is "right" for your beer.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline bluesman

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Re: carbonation for dunkelweizen
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2010, 12:31:36 PM »
+1

Start low and go from there. I would apply 15psi for a week and try it. Some folks like the quick and easy method by applying 30psi and shaking the keg to force the CO2 into solution quicker. 

I prefer the "set it and forget it method". For most ales I apply 12-14psi and the beer is ready in less than two weeks.
More effervessent beers are set at 15+psi.

As Gordon said...let your tongue tell you if it's right because ultimately you are the one who has to like the beer.
Ron Price

Offline octess

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Re: carbonation for dunkelweizen
« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2010, 10:58:05 PM »
That P&T will put you up around 4 volumes of CO2, which is in the range for hefeweizen but isn't a rule.  Start lower if you like and see how it is, then turn it up and keep testing it.  It will be a pain though, because to do it right once the dissolved gas level has stabilized at each point you'll need to keep making the hose longer as you turn up the gas to get the right pour.  It's less hose consuming to start higher and make the hose shorter as you go, but then you have the problem of getting the CO2 out of solution.  Or you could bottle some test samples with different amounts of sugar to get varying levels of carbonation, and then see where you like it.

That's what I thought: The higher the keg's pressure, the longer the hose! Makes sense if you want to drink it and not make it bubble bath stuff!
As far as bottling goes...well, let's stick to kegs  ;D!
Viva el art of brewing alchemy!