Author Topic: Dry-hopping  (Read 2155 times)

Offline skyler

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Re: Dry-hopping
« Reply #15 on: December 01, 2010, 03:44:19 AM »
I used them a couple times. Treat them like Mt. Hood ormaybe Willamette. If used early in the boil, you will get IBU's. If used late, you won't get much at all.

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Dry-hopping
« Reply #16 on: December 01, 2010, 10:53:01 AM »
So if you boiled it for 60 minutes in a small amount of water, you should be able to add that to the beer and bumb up the bitterness, right?  I think it sounds easier than trying to get bitterness out of pellet or whole hops in a small volume.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline denny

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Re: Dry-hopping
« Reply #17 on: December 01, 2010, 11:07:24 AM »
So if you boiled it for 60 minutes in a small amount of water, you should be able to add that to the beer and bumb up the bitterness, right?  I think it sounds easier than trying to get bitterness out of pellet or whole hops in a small volume.

In my experience, you may get bitterness, but it's a very harsh, vegetal bitterness that I certainly wouldn't want in my beer.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Dry-hopping
« Reply #18 on: December 01, 2010, 11:24:26 AM »
So if you boiled it for 60 minutes in a small amount of water, you should be able to add that to the beer and bumb up the bitterness, right?  I think it sounds easier than trying to get bitterness out of pellet or whole hops in a small volume.

In my experience, you may get bitterness, but it's a very harsh, vegetal bitterness that I certainly wouldn't want in my beer.
Are we still talking about the hop shots Denny, or are you talking about boiling hops in plain water?

http://www.northernbrewer.com/brewing/hopshot.html
Tom Schmidlin

Offline Kirk

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Re: Dry-hopping
« Reply #19 on: December 12, 2010, 06:25:45 PM »
Today, 22 days after brewing, I tasted all three brews. 
Wyeast 3787 - awesome.  This one was not augmented after the brew like the other two.  But something new I did, new for me, was to include carmelized sugar in the boil, turbinado, carmelized in a large skillet.  It's amazing how the sugar allows it to attenuate very dry (82% 1.010) without erasing all the sweetness, adding the elegance factor.  This one is cold conditioning now, and I'll keg it in a week or two.
Wyeast 1968 - turned out great.  No problems resulted from adding the bitter wort a few days after the boil.  I wouldn't do it again unless I had to, but I learned a lot.  The added sugar also let it attenuate way down there (80% at least), but it still has sweetness.  Not a style winner (too dry), but clear of course, clean, elegant, good.  It's also cold conditioning, like the Belgian.
WLP013 - Ditto as for the 1968.  Less flocculent of course, but no problem I'm going to bottle it, and put off cold conditioning for about another month.
What I learned - Sugar is a great additive.  Increases attenuation, dries the finish, and leaves sweetness.
I wouldn't add as much as I did in any future beers, except for Belgians, but it's awesome stuff.
Thanks for all the help.
Kirk Howell

Offline EHall

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Re: Dry-hopping
« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2010, 07:11:28 PM »
I made the mistake of boiling hops in plain water to add some bitterness to an under bittered beer... big mistake, although it did mellow in about 6 months... I would highly recomend adding some DME or corn sugar to it, like Denny said, its not a good bitterness... at least at first.
Phoenix, AZ