Author Topic: How will omitting dark grains from the mash effect pH down the line?  (Read 1439 times)

Offline syncopadence

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 156
I've seen several methods on alternative ways to use dark grains, but I'm curious if it'll drop the pH too low once the grains (or "tea") are finally added? You obviously want to stay in a certain range throughout the whole process, so I'm concerned adding the grains down the line will drop it below a desirable number.
Thanks for any help in advance.

Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk


Offline Bob357

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 658
  • Consensus means nothing to me. I am who I am.
Re: How will omitting dark grains from the mash effect pH down the line?
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2017, 10:33:15 pm »
The liquid from the dark specialty grains will usually be relatively small compared to the main wort, so the pH change will be much less than you might think. you could adjust the pH of your steeping liquid if you are that concerned.

You might liken the process to extract brewing with specialty grains. 
Beer is my bucket list,

Bob357
Fallon, NV

Offline curtdogg

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 464
  • Learning everyday
Re: How will omitting dark grains from the mash effect pH down the line?
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2017, 10:33:15 pm »
I've seen several methods on alternative ways to use dark grains, but I'm curious if it'll drop the pH too low once the grains (or "tea") are finally added? You obviously want to stay in a certain range throughout the whole process, so I'm concerned adding the grains down the line will drop it below a desirable number.
Thanks for any help in advance.

Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

Having your pH within range during mash will help with extraction and  efficiency.
The fermentation process will lower the pH even further.
Experiment by making a tea at different temps, check the pH and taste the tea. This may also help you figure out what flavor you desire from the dark grains.
Sweet home of the Beer Lords.

Offline mabrungard

  • I spend way too much time on the AHA forum
  • ********
  • Posts: 2808
  • Water matters!
    • Bru'n Water
Re: How will omitting dark grains from the mash effect pH down the line?
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2017, 02:02:54 am »
The resulting pH drop will depend upon the percentage of the grist and acidity of those grains. For something like a Schwartzbier or Munich Dunkel, the additions probably won't make much difference.

In the case of beers like most Porters and Stouts, the pH drop is likely to be substantial and it will affect the beer perception. A style that benefits from that pH drop is the Irish Dry Stout which is supposed to be nice and acidic to provide a contrast with the roast barley and raw barley flavors.
Martin B
Carmel, IN

BJCP National
Foam Blowers of Indiana (FBI)

Brewing Water Information at:
https://www.brunwater.com/

Like Bru'n Water on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/Brun-Water-464551136933908/?ref=bookmarks

Offline syncopadence

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 156
Re: How will omitting dark grains from the mash effect pH down the line?
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2017, 09:36:43 pm »
The resulting pH drop will depend upon the percentage of the grist and acidity of those grains. For something like a Schwartzbier or Munich Dunkel, the additions probably won't make much difference.

In the case of beers like most Porters and Stouts, the pH drop is likely to be substantial and it will affect the beer perception. A style that benefits from that pH drop is the Irish Dry Stout which is supposed to be nice and acidic to provide a contrast with the roast barley and raw barley flavors.
With the help of your software, I've been adjusting my sparge water with lactic acid. Instead of using lactic acid, do you think I could just rely on adding the dark grains on top of the mash right before fly sparging?

Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk