Author Topic: Sparge Arm Ideas?  (Read 17813 times)

Offline MDixon

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Re: Sparge Arm Ideas?
« Reply #30 on: November 26, 2010, 07:12:41 PM »
25.625 x 36 = ~922
4.75 x 189 = ~898
898 / 922 = 97.3% which is virtually impossible, even at 38ppg it's still like 93%.
How are you measuring 1.189 and how do you know it is accurate?
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Offline bonjour

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Re: Sparge Arm Ideas?
« Reply #31 on: November 26, 2010, 07:30:00 PM »
At that level it has to be calculated unless you have a refractometer that reads that high, I don't yet.
So I calculated the additions I made and added them together initially,  Then checked by measuring the FG by both hydrometer and refractometer and used a calculator.   So yes estimates were involved.
Fred Bonjour
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Everything under 1.100 is a 'session' beer ;)

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Sparge Arm Ideas?
« Reply #32 on: November 27, 2010, 12:23:29 AM »
Get yourself a small graduated cylinder, then dilute the wort with an equal amount of water.  Multiply the refractometer reading by 2, and bob's your uncle.  It will be cheaper than buying a high gravity refractometer, $7.50 from morebeer.

http://morebeer.com/view_product/6540//Graduated_Cylinder_-_10mL
Tom Schmidlin

Offline Homebrewer7

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Re: Sparge Arm Ideas?
« Reply #33 on: February 22, 2017, 02:43:17 AM »
The best Sparge Arm I have seen is here
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eSb9WjPfSY4&feature=youtu.be

Offline curtdogg

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Re: Sparge Arm Ideas?
« Reply #34 on: February 22, 2017, 11:50:15 AM »
Get yourself a small graduated cylinder, then dilute the wort with an equal amount of water.  Multiply the refractometer reading by 2, and bob's your uncle.  It will be cheaper than buying a high gravity refractometer, $7.50 from morebeer.

http://morebeer.com/view_product/6540//Graduated_Cylinder_-_10mL
Bought my ATC refractometer for $20 online. Works great and saves time.

Offline natebrews

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Sparge Arm Ideas?
« Reply #35 on: February 22, 2017, 02:54:30 PM »
To the OP subject, when I fly sparse in my 10g round igloo cooler, I just leave about 1-2 inches of liquid on top of the mash and then put a chunk of silicone hose from the HLT around the perimeter about 3/4 of a turn sitting right on the grain.  This is injecting tangentially (and horizontally) from the HLT.  When it is running, the liquid has a slow rotation to it as the sparge water comes in.  No manifolds or arms or whatever, just 4' of 1/2 inch hose. 

Sometimes I just run all the sparge water into the cooler at once after the liquid has drained to the level of the grain bed.  That way I don't worry about rates, but it could end up compressing the mash I suppose ( not that it has ever happened to me).
« Last Edit: February 22, 2017, 03:23:36 PM by natebrews »
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Offline Stevie

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Re: Sparge Arm Ideas?
« Reply #36 on: February 22, 2017, 03:06:42 PM »
This thread is so old it has a crush on its first grade teacher.

Offline natebrews

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Re: Sparge Arm Ideas?
« Reply #37 on: February 22, 2017, 03:22:30 PM »
Hey, some first grade teachers have it going on!
Risk of failure should be no deterrent to trying.

Offline goforthegusto

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Re: Sparge Arm Ideas?
« Reply #38 on: March 06, 2017, 09:03:37 PM »
I know this is an old thread, but I thought I would post what I do. I use a loc-line that I can adjust to keep just below the water surface. It works very well.DSC_4978 by The Gustos, on Flickr