Author Topic: Getting a dog  (Read 1530 times)

Offline phillamb168

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Getting a dog
« on: December 06, 2010, 10:12:11 AM »
I want a Golden Retriever. My wife used to be super scared of dogs (she was bitten, once, by a pekingese, when she was 10) but I've slowly gotten her feeling better around them. But she says no dog until we have at least one child over the age of 10. I would prefer not to wait a decade to get a pooch, so I'm looking for help convincing her. We have a decent sized yard and a huuuge park across the street, so exercise is not a problem (although I'm sure I'll be a bit winded for the first few walkies). Anybody ever had to convince a wife before? Did you succeed? How'd you do it?
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Offline euge

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2010, 10:22:55 AM »
Getting a weaned puppy will appeal to her maternal side.

I'm hoping my colleague's Chihuahua actually got knocked up as she's fearing. I already told her I want one!
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Offline svejk

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2010, 10:28:32 AM »
I agree - just go to "look" at an available puppy and it's a done deal.  My wife and I went to look at puppies and the conversation was never "do we want one?", but "which one?".

Offline phillamb168

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2010, 10:57:59 AM »
The problem with puppies is that (so I've heard) they're super difficult to manage for about two years. I suppose I could hire a trainer/take a training class but my wife would be stuck dealing with him/her during the day while I'm at work, and I feel like that wouldn't be fair. I've been trying to find a breed shelter like they have in the states - I was thinking that an older dog (4 years +) would be much easier for everybody. Not sure though - I wouldn't want to get one and then it not work out and the poor guy has to go to yet -another- home.
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Offline 1vertical

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2010, 11:07:20 AM »
The problem with puppies is that (so I've heard) they're super difficult to manage for about two years. I suppose I could hire a trainer/take a training class but my wife would be stuck dealing with him/her during the day while I'm at work, and I feel like that wouldn't be fair. I've been trying to find a breed shelter like they have in the states - I was thinking that an older dog (4 years +) would be much easier for everybody. Not sure though - I wouldn't want to get one and then it not work out and the poor guy has to go to yet -another- home.
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Offline Mikey

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2010, 11:20:01 AM »
One of the most gentle dogs is a lab, but they are pure hell for the first 2-3 years. Very mischievous.

Whatever you do, please rescue one from the shelter, rather than buy from a store which gets them from puppy mills.

Offline blatz

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2010, 12:13:26 PM »
One of the most gentle dogs is a lab, but they are pure hell for the first 2-3 years. Very mischievous.

Whatever you do, please rescue one from the shelter, rather than buy from a store which gets them from puppy mills.

+1 all the way.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2010, 12:14:04 PM »
Have had dogs all my life and kids for the last 13 years. Never had a problem. Latest dog is a great dane that I got 5 years ago when my youngest one was about 3. Dogs are actually really, really good with kids - especially younger dogs. If a dog tends to bite it is usually going to be an older dog. As long as you get a puppy and raise it with a gentle hand it will not bite your child.

Your wife has a logical fear of dogs, due to her having been bitten, but it would be incorrect to think that a family dog is "dangerous" to a child under the age of 10. An older dog from the pound or a neighborhood stray you don't know? In that case I would be concerned. But a dog will almost always reflect the owner who raises it. If you teach it properly it won't bite.
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Offline akr71

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #8 on: December 06, 2010, 12:34:42 PM »
One of the most gentle dogs is a lab, but they are pure hell for the first 2-3 years. Very mischievous.

Whatever you do, please rescue one from the shelter, rather than buy from a store which gets them from puppy mills.

Another +++

We have a chocolate lab.  He's almost 5 now and finally slowing down.  As a puppy I'd have to run him for at least an hour, every day - the days he didn't get his run (notice I say run, not walk  ;) ), he could be a real handfull.  We knew a lab puppy was high energy, but we had no idea how much energy!  IME Golden Retrievers are very similar to Labradors.

It was my wife's first dog (and she'd wanted one since she was 5), but 3 weeks in, she was in tears.  Luckily, we found a great trainer, worked hard with the trainer and dog and we have a great family pet - absolutely FANTASTIC with our kids (7 & 2).

Give a loving home to an older (trained) dog.  Puppies are cute, but if you want to turn your wife into a dog lover, resue a dog form a shelter.
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Offline hokerer

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2010, 12:41:20 PM »
And name him Hosehead...

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Offline bluesman

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2010, 12:51:13 PM »
We have a chocolate lab.  He's almost 5 now and finally slowing down.  As a puppy I'd have to run him for at least an hour, every day - the days he didn't get his run (notice I say run, not walk  ;) ), he could be a real handfull.  We knew a lab puppy was high energy, but we had no idea how much energy!  IME Golden Retrievers are very similar to Labradors.

+1

Me too.

I have a five year old Chocolate Lab that is gentle, loyal and extremely freindly.  He's my pal. He loves children to death.
Anytime he sees children he gets a charge because he wants to play with them.  IMO, labs are the best dogs around children.
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Offline Mikey

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2010, 01:36:39 PM »
I should also mention that if you happen to live close to water, your lab will always be wet.

Offline Kaiser

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #12 on: December 06, 2010, 02:32:44 PM »
We adopted a hound mix a few month ago. It was my wife's idea and she thought it would be good for the kids. I didn't stand in the way since we have the space for a dog and I love dogs.

Charlie, our dog, is very active. I have to take him running at least every other day otherwise he becomes difficult to handle. He is fine with the kids but sees my 4 year old as his puppy play-mate. This means he oftentimes chases his which my son doesn't always like.

Now that the dog is about 9 month old he has become easier to manage. Partly because of the exercise and partly because he seems to have learned what he can chew and what he can't. We also have become better at keeping toys and other stuff off the floor and out of his reach.

I finally started putting in an in-ground fence (don't hate me for this) which means we will be able to let the dog roam in the yard. That will also allow him to release his energy.

I'm just saying that getting a puppy is rewarding, especially if you like dogs, but its a lot of work. Especially the training.

Kai


Offline Kit B

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2010, 02:49:30 PM »
A couple years ago, I rescued a 1 year old pointer mix from a shelter.
She had severe behavior problems due to a life of roaming the Kentucky countryside, but my wife & I were against giving her back to the shelter.
We went to several obedience classes & found that she just couldn't be around most other dogs, without a total meltdown.
I don't know what it is, but she just dislikes most other dogs.
Since we were having such a hard time with her, I decided to get a DNA test done by a reputable lab.
Well...My pointer mix turned out to be an American Foxhound/Neopolitan Mastiff/Shar Pei mix.
Now, I see that her listening problems come from being an independent foxhound, her aggression comes from the shar pei & her sleep habits/laziness come from the mastiff.
This is the long way around to answering, but my dog has turned out great.
She's now over 3 years old & has matured, drastically.
I have a 8 month-old son & she loves him, dearly...I couldn't ask for a better buddy, for him.
If you have children, a shelter dog may not be the right fit...Just choose wisely & think very, very hard on it, before you decide what dog to get & where to adopt from.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Getting a dog
« Reply #14 on: December 06, 2010, 02:52:28 PM »
One thing I would highly recommend, if you get a puppy, is to crate train it. This just means you get a small cage to keep the dog in when it is not being supervised. This help to keep damage down to a minimum from chewing and and it also really helps aid in house breaking.

You want to get a crate big enough and comfortable enough for the dog to lay down in. And when you are not in the house the dog stays in the cage. Then, to house break the dog you take the dog outside directly from the crate. After it takes care of it business you bring it in and let it have some supervised free time in the house. If it does not take care of business you put it back in the crate and try again after a while. The only time it is allowed free time out of the crate is after it has taken care of its business. If it has an accident you immediately put it in the crate.

This saves lots of damage from the puppy phase. Dogs, especially large breed dogs, can quickly destroy a sofa, wall, pick nick table, pool table, you name it!

As the dog matures you will be able to start weaning it from the crate. Some dogs enjoy having the crate as a "safe place" and you may always keep it around. Other dogs may not want to stay in the crate at all you in those cases you can just put the crate up and save it for the next puppy. Be sure to keep the crate somewhere near a main family gathering area.
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